Capell L. Weems

Capell Lane Weems (July 7, 1860 – January 5, 1913) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Whigville, Ohio, Weems attended the common schools and normal academy, Caldwell, Ohio. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1883 and commenced practice in Caldwell.

Weems was elected prosecuting attorney of Noble County in 1884. He served as member of the Ohio House of Representatives in 1888 and 1889. He moved to St. Clairsville, Ohio, in 1890 and served as prosecuting attorney of Belmont County 1890-1896.

Weems was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-eighth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Joseph J. Gill. He was reelected to the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Congresses and served from November 3, 1903, to March 3, 1909. He resumed the practice of law and was solicitor for the Pennsylvania Railroad.

He died in Steubenville, Ohio, January 5, 1913. He was interred in Union Cemetery, St. Clairsville, Ohio.

Weems married Mary B. Nay of West Virginia on November 6, 1883. They had children named Chester N., Milton M., and Lillian A.[1]

Capell L. Weems
Capell L. Weems 1903
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 16th district
In office
November 3, 1903 – March 3, 1909
Preceded byJoseph J. Gill
Succeeded byDavid Hollingsworth
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the Noble County district
In office
January 2, 1888 – January 5, 1890
Preceded byThomas C. Williams
Succeeded byChris McKee
Personal details
BornJuly 7, 1860
Whigville, Ohio
DiedJanuary 5, 1913 (aged 52)
Steubenville, Ohio
Resting placeUnion Cemetery, St. Clairsville
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Mary B. Nay
Childrenthree

References

  1. ^ McKelvey, A T, ed. (1903). Centennial History of Belmont County, Ohio, and Representative Citizens. Chicago: Biographical Publishing Company. pp. 562, 563.

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph J. Gill
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 17th congressional district

November 3, 1903 - March 3, 1909
Succeeded by
David Hollingsworth
58th United States Congress

The Fifty-eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC, from March 4, 1903, to March 4, 1905, during the third and fourth years of Theodore Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twelfth Census of the United States in 1900. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

59th United States Congress

The Fifty-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1905, to March 4, 1907, during the fifth and sixth years of Theodore Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twelfth Census of the United States in 1900. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

60th United States Congress

The Sixtieth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1907, to March 4, 1909, during the last two years of Theodore Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twelfth Census of the United States in 1900. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

David Hollingsworth

David Adams Hollingsworth (November 21, 1844 – December 3, 1929) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Belmont, Ohio, Hollingsworth moved with his parents to Flushing, Ohio.

He attended the public schools.

He served in the Union Army in Company B, Twenty-fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry from 1861 to 1863.

He studied law at Mount Union College, Alliance, Ohio.

He was admitted to the bar in St. Clairsville, Ohio, on September 17, 1867, and commenced practice in Flushing.

He served as mayor of Flushing in 1867.

He moved to Cadiz, Ohio, in 1869 and continued the practice of law.

Hollingsworth was elected prosecuting attorney of Harrison County in 1873 and reelected in 1875.

He served as member of the State senate in 1879 and reelected in 1881.

He was admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court in 1880.

He served as chairman of the Republican State convention in 1882.

On April 21, 1883, he resigned as Senator to accept appointment as Ohio Attorney General. He did not run for re-election and served until January 14, 1884.

He resumed the practice of law in Cadiz.

He was one of the organizers of the Ohio State Bar Association, serving as chairman in 1908.

Hollingsworth was elected as a Republican to the Sixty-first Congress (March 4, 1909 – March 3, 1911).

He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1910 to the Sixty-second Congress.

He resumed the practice of law in Cadiz.

Hollingsworth was elected to the Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1919).

He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1918.

He resumed the practice of law until his death in Cadiz, Ohio, December 3, 1929.

He was interred in Cadiz Cemetery.

He was married April 8, 1875 to Linda McBean of Cadiz. She had two sons, Henry, and Donald, who died in early childhood. Hollingsworth was a Mason, Elk, Knight of Pythias, Methodist, and member of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Joseph J. Gill

Joseph John Gill (September 21, 1846 – May 22, 1920) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Barnesville, Ohio, Gill moved with his parents to Mount Pleasant, Ohio, in 1848.

He pursued an academic course and was graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1868.

He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Jefferson County, Ohio.

He subsequently engaged in banking and later in manufacturing and iron mining.

Gill was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-sixth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Lorenzo Danford.

He was reelected to the Fifty-seventh and Fifty-eighth Congresses and served from December 4, 1899, until October 31, 1903, when he resigned.

He died in Steubenville, Ohio, May 22, 1920.

He was interred in Union Cemetery.

List of United States Representatives from Ohio

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Ohio. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state (through the present day), see United States Congressional Delegations from Ohio. The list of names should be complete (as of January 2019), but other data may be incomplete.

List of former members of the United States House of Representatives (W)

This is the complete list of former members of the United States House of Representatives whose last names begin with the letter W.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 58th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 58th United States Congress listed by seniority.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 58th Congress (March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1905). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 59th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 59th United States Congress listed by seniority.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 59th Congress (March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1907). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 60th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 60th United States Congress listed by seniority.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 60th Congress (March 4, 1907 – March 3, 1909). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of special elections to the United States House of Representatives

Below is a list of special elections to the United States House of Representatives. Such elections are called by state governors to fill vacancies that occur when a member of the House of Representatives dies or resigns before the biennial general election. Winners of these elections serve the remainder of the term and are usually candidates in the next general election for their districts.

In the United States, these contests have been called "special elections" because they do not occur on Election Day like regular congressional elections. Despite their name, however, special elections to the U.S. House happen quite often. Furthermore, one published study shows that special elections are explained by the same factors as regular congressional elections. Special elections to the U.S. House of Representatives have occurred at least once in all states except Iowa and Idaho. A few special elections for territorial delegates to Congress have also been held.

A 2016 study of special elections to the United States House of Representatives found "that while candidate characteristics affect special election outcomes, presidential approval is predictive of special election outcomes as well. Furthermore, we find that the effect of presidential approval on special election outcomes has increased in magnitude from 1995 to 2014, with the 2002 midterm representing an important juncture in the nationalization of special elections."

Ohio's 16th congressional district

The 16th congressional district of Ohio is represented by Representative Anthony Gonzalez (R). It also includes some rural communities east of Akron, as well as some of the western suburbs of Cleveland.

From 2003 to 2013 the district was based in Stark County and the Canton area and also included Wayne County and most of Medina and Ashland counties.

On November 2, 2010, John Boccieri lost his bid for a second term to Republican Jim Renacci, who was seated in January 2011. In January 2018, Renacci announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate. Anthony Gonzalez was elected on November 6th to succeed him.

United States congressional delegations from Ohio

These are tables of congressional delegations from Ohio to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Whigville, Ohio

Whigville (also Freedom) is an unincorporated community in Noble County, Ohio, United States.

Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio's 16th congressional district

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