Canadian Soccer Association

The Canadian Soccer Association (Canada Soccer) (French: Association canadienne de soccer) is the governing body of soccer in Canada. It is a national organization that oversees the Canadian men's and women's national teams for international play, as well as the respective junior sides (U-20 and U-17 for men and women). Within Canada, it oversees national professional and amateur club championships.

Canadian Soccer Association
CONCACAF
Canadian Soccer Association logo
Founded1912
HeadquartersOttawa
FIFA affiliation1912
CONCACAF affiliation1961[1]
PresidentSteve Reed
Websitewww.canadasoccer.com

Organization and Governance

Canada Soccer's objectives, as described in its by-laws, are to:[2]

  1. promote, regulate and control the game of soccer throughout Canada, particularly through youth and development programs;
  2. organize competitions in Association Football in all its forms at a national level, by defining the areas of authority conceded to the various leagues of which it is composed;
  3. draw up Association Football regulations and provisions, and ensure their enforcement;
  4. protect the interests of its Members;
  5. respect and prevent any infringement of the statutes, regulations, directives and decisions of FIFA, CONCACAF and The CSA, as well as the Laws of the Game;
  6. prevent all methods or practices that jeopardize the integrity of matches or competitions or give rise to abuse of Association Football;
  7. control and supervise all friendly Association Football matches played throughout Canada;
  8. manage international sporting relations connected with Association Football;
  9. host competitions at international and other levels.

Canada Soccer is governed by a Board of Directors consisting of 14 directors: a President, Vice President, six elected directors, and six appointed or independent directors.[2][3] Each of the six elected directors is elected from one of six geographic regions. The board must include at least three men and three women. The president of the board is Victor Montagliani and the vice president is Steven Reed.

Canada Soccer is administered by the General Secretariat, which is led by General Secretary Peter Montopoli and Deputy General Secretary Earl Cochrane.[4] The General Secretary is the chief executive of Soccer Canada, and is appointed by the Board of Directors.[2] The head office is located in Ottawa, Ontario.

Canada Soccer is a member of FIFA and of CONCACAF.

History

The Dominion of Canada Football Association, today known as the Canadian Soccer Association, was founded in Winnipeg, Manitoba in July 1912. "At the meeting, the Manitoba Football Association joined with the provincial associations of Ontario, New Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Alberta to form the national association."[5][6] The organization joined FIFA on December 31, 1912. On June 21, 1926, the DCFA resigned from FIFA, only to rejoin on June 20, 1948. The governing body of the game retained that name until it was changed to The Football Association of Canada on June 6, 1952. The association later changed its name to the Canadian Soccer Football Association in 1958 and then at last to the Canadian Soccer Association in 1971.

National teams

The association's national teams have won nine confederation championships. Canada won the 1985 CONCACAF Men's Championship and the 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup; Canada's women's "A" team won the 1998 and 2010 CONCACAF women's championships. The men's youth team won the 1986 and 1996 CONCACAF Under-20 Championship while the women's youth team won the 2004 and 2008 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship along with the 2010 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship.

Men

The Canada men's national soccer team represents Canada in international soccer competitions at the senior men's level. They are overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and compete in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF). Their most significant achievements are winning the 1985 CONCACAF Championship to qualify for the 1986 FIFA World Cup and winning the 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup to qualify for the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup. Canada also won a gold medal in the 1904 Summer Olympics. Canada with Mexico and United States will jointly host the 2026 FIFA World Cup in the first ever 48 team event.

Women

The Canada women's national soccer team represents Canada in international women's soccer and is directed by the Canadian Soccer Association. Canada hosted the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and reached the quarter-finals. The team reached international prominence at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, losing in the third place match to the United States. Canada qualified for its first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 2008, making it to the quarterfinals. Canada are two-time CONCACAF women's champions as well as Olympic bronze medallists from London 2012 where they defeated France 1–0 and the 2016 Olympics in Brazil. Canadian women's soccer fans are also closely linked to the U-20 team (U-19 prior to 2006), partly due to Canada hosting the inaugural FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship in 2002 and winning silver in front of 47,784 fans at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta.

International tournaments hosted

The association has hosted several FIFA tournaments: the FIFA U-16 World Championship (1987), the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup (2002, 2014), the FIFA U-20 World Cup (2007), the FIFA Women's World Cup (2015), and will co-host the FIFA World Cup (2026) along with Mexico and United States.

Professional leagues and cups

Canada has three professional teams competing in Major League Soccer (Division I, USSF), seven professional teams in the Canadian Premier League (Division I, CSA), one professional team competing in the USL Championship (Division II, USSF), and one professional team competing in USL League One (Division III, USSF).

At the professional level, Canada's primary competition is the Canadian Championship. The Canadian Championship is an annual soccer tournament contested by premier Canadian professional teams. The winner is awarded the Voyageurs Cup and Canada's berth in the CONCACAF Champions League[7] In 2008, the Montreal Impact won the inaugural competition ahead of Toronto FC and Vancouver Whitecaps FC. By finishing first, the Impact won the Voyageurs Cup and qualified for the CONCACAF Champions League 2008-09 season. Canada's best performance in the CONCACAF Champions League came in the 2014-15 competition, when Montreal Impact reached the finals.[8] Toronto FC also reached the final in the 2018 CONCACAF Champions League where the fell in penalties to C.D. Guadalajara.[9]

Joining inaugural Canadian Championship participants Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, FC Edmonton entered the competition in 2011, and the Ottawa Fury entered in 2014. As of 2014, it will be contested by Toronto FC, Vancouver Whitecaps FC, Montreal Impact and United Soccer League side Ottawa Fury FC.[10] It is organized by the Canadian Soccer Association.[11]

Amateur and youth

At the amateur level, Canada's club competitions fall under the National Championships. The senior champions are awarded the Challenge Trophy (men) and Jubilee Trophy (women). Club championships are also organized at the U-18, U-16 and U-14 levels.

Associations affiliated with Canada Soccer

Senior level

  1. Canada men's national soccer team
  2. Canada women's national soccer team
  3. Canada men's national beach soccer team
  4. Canada men's national cerebral palsy soccer team
  5. Canada men's national futsal team

Youth sides

  1. Canada men's national under-23 (Olympic) soccer team
  2. Canada men's national under-20 soccer team
  3. Canada women's national under-20 soccer team
  4. Canada men's national under-17 soccer team
  5. Canada women's national under-17 soccer team

Leagues and organizations

  1. Major League Soccer (MLS)
  2. United Soccer League (USL)
    1. USL League Two
  3. Canadian Premier League (CPL)
  4. League1 Ontario (L1O)
  5. Première Ligue de soccer du Québec (PLSQ)
  6. United Women's Soccer (UWS)
  7. Women's Premier Soccer League (WPSL)

In addition, Canada Soccer is a financial backer of the U.S. National Women's Soccer League, set to launch in 2013 as that country's third attempt at a women's professional league. Specifically, Canada Soccer is paying the NWSL salaries of 16 national team players.[12]

List of presidents

As of November 14, 2017[13]
No. Name Tenure
1 Fred Barter 1912
2 Tom Watson 1913
3 Edward Bailey Fisher 1914
4 Hugh Craig Cambell 1915–1919
5 Tom Guthrie 1919
6 Dan McNeil 1920–1921
7 John Easton 1922–1925
8 John Russell 1925–1931
9 Tom Holland 1931–1932
10 Charles Smail 1932–1934
11 Len Peto 1935–1938
12 Tom Elliot 1939–1940
13 Fred Crumblehulme 1946–1947
14 Robert Walker 1947
15 Otis Todd 1947–1949
16 Charles Pinnell 1949–1953
17 Ernest Campbell 1953
18 Jock Hendry 1954–1956
19 Arthur Arnold 1957
20 Victor Hagen 1958–1960
21 Patrick Nolan 1961–1962
22 Dave Fryatt 1963–1964
23 Bill Simpson 1965–1968
24 Aubrey Sanford 1969–1971
25 John Barnes 1972–1973
26 Bill Stirling 1973–1981
27 Jim Fleming 1982–1985
28 Fred Stambrook 1986–1991
29 Terry Quinn 1992–1997
30 Andy Sharpe 2001–2005
31 Colin Linford 2006–2007
32 Dominic Maestracci 2008–2012
33 Victor Montagliani 2012–2017
34 Steve Reed 2017–present

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ramón Coll, electo Presidente de la Confederación de Futbol de América del Norte, América Central y el Caribe". La Nación (Google News Archive). September 23, 1961.
  2. ^ a b c Canadian Soccer Association by-laws 2013. Retrieved April 25, 2014.
  3. ^ Canada Soccer Governance, CanadaSoccer.com. Retrieved April 25, 2014.
  4. ^ Canada Soccer staff. Retrieved April 25, 2014.
  5. ^ Jose, Colin. "Manitoba: The Early Years". Canadian Soccer History. Canadian Soccer History. Retrieved January 25, 2017.
  6. ^ "Manitoba". Soccer Hall of Fame and Museum. Soccer Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved January 25, 2017.
  7. ^ "Canadian teams set to do battle". Globe and Mail. Canada. March 27, 2008. Retrieved March 28, 2008.
  8. ^ The Canadian Press More The Canadian Press. "Montreal Impact become first Canadian team to advance to CONCACAF final". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved April 8, 2015.
  9. ^ Laura Armstrong. "Toronto FC loses CONCACAF Champions League final in dramatic shootout". Toronto Star. Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  10. ^ [1] Archived November 14, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ "2012 Amway Canadian Championship". Retrieved January 27, 2012.
  12. ^ "U.S. Soccer Unveils Name of New Women's Soccer League" (Press release). United States Soccer Federation. December 15, 2012. Archived from the original on April 3, 2013. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  13. ^ "Board of Directors". canadasoccer.com.

External links

2015 Canadian Championship

The 2015 Canadian Championship (officially the Amway Canadian Championship for sponsorship reasons) was a soccer tournament hosted and organized by the Canadian Soccer Association. It was the eighth edition of the annual Canadian Championship, and took place in the cities of Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver in 2015. The participating teams were Ottawa Fury FC and FC Edmonton of the North American Soccer League, the second-level of the Canadian Soccer Pyramid, and Montreal Impact, Toronto FC and Vancouver Whitecaps FC of Major League Soccer, the first-level of Canadian club soccer. Montreal Impact were the two-time defending champions.

The winner, Vancouver Whitecaps FC, were awarded the Voyageurs Cup and will become Canada's entry into the Group Stage of the 2016–17 CONCACAF Champions League. This is a permanent change from procedure used in the past, where the Canadian Champion qualified for the CONCACAF Champions League beginning the same year (in this case, 2015–16).

The tournament moved to an April–August timeframe from its usual April–June timeframe to accommodate the schedule of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup held in Canada. It was permanently moved to a June/July timeframe in 2016.

2016 Canadian Championship

The 2016 Canadian Championship (officially the Amway Canadian Championship for sponsorship reasons) was a soccer tournament hosted and organized by the Canadian Soccer Association. It was the ninth edition of the annual Canadian Championship, and took place in the cities of Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver in 2016. The participating teams were Ottawa Fury FC and FC Edmonton of the second-division North American Soccer League, and the Montreal Impact, Toronto FC and Vancouver Whitecaps FC of Major League Soccer, the first-level of Canadian club soccer. The Vancouver Whitecaps were the reigning champions; having won their first title in the 2015 competition.

The winner, Toronto FC, was awarded the Voyageurs Cup and was supposed to become Canada's sole entry into the Group Stage of the 2017–18 CONCACAF Champions League. However, due to that tournament's restructuring, it was later announced that the Canadian representative at the 2018 CONCACAF Champions League would be determined by a playoff match between Toronto FC and the 2017 Canadian Championship winner. Toronto FC went on to win the 2017 edition, however, and qualified without the need for a playoff.

Canada Soccer Hall of Fame

The Canada Soccer Hall of Fame honours people and institutions for their contributions to Canadian soccer. It was founded in 1997 by the Ontario Soccer Association and was originally located in Vaughan, Ontario. From 2000 to 2018, the Canada Soccer Hall of Fame has inducted 114 players, 13 managers/coaches, 10 officials, and 40 builders as honoured members. Additionally, the Canada Soccer Hall of Fame has recognized 13 teams of distinction and seven organizations of distinction.

After the Canadian Soccer Association Alumni Association was founded in 1987 and then The Soccer Hall of Fame was founded by the Ontario Soccer Association in 1997 (which was operated in Vaughan, Ontario), the new Canada Soccer Hall of Fame was launched in May 2017 under the direction of the Canadian Soccer Association in Ottawa, Ontario. All previously-inducted members of The Soccer Hall of Fame as well as a catch-up class of 17 legends were named to the new Canada Soccer Hall of Fame.

Canada men's national soccer team

The Canada men's national soccer team (French: Équipe du Canada de soccer masculin) represents Canada in international soccer competitions at the senior men's level officially since 1924. They are overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and compete in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).Their most significant achievements are winning the 1985 CONCACAF Championship to qualify for the 1986 FIFA World Cup and winning the 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup to qualify for the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup. Canada is the only national team to win a Gold Cup aside from regional powerhouses Mexico and the United States. Canada also won a gold medal in the 1904 Summer Olympics. The 1986 World Cup was their only successful qualification campaign in their history.

Canada men's national under-23 soccer team

The Canada men's national under-23 soccer team or the Canada Olympic soccer team represents Canada in international soccer at this age level and is controlled by the Canadian Soccer Association, the governing body for soccer in Canada.Unlike UEFA member associations that use U-21 regional competitions as Olympic qualifying, as a member of CONCACAF, Canada's U-23 team competes in regional qualifying in the same year as the summer Olympics and its call-ups are traditionally only limited to players under 23 years of age.

Canada national beach soccer team

The Canada national beach soccer team represents Canada in international beach soccer competitions and is controlled by the Canadian Soccer Association, the governing body for soccer in Canada.

Canada national futsal team

The Canadian national futsal team is a futsal team that represents Canada at international competitions. It is controlled by the Canadian Soccer Association and affiliated with CONCACAF. Their first FIFA sanctioned international was played in 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands at the 1989 FIFA Futsal World Cup against Argentina. The match resulted in a 3–1 loss. The team is coached by Kyt Selaidopoulos. Their most recent tournament was the 2016 CONCACAF Futsal Championship, where the team finished one point away from qualifying for the 2016 FIFA Futsal World Cup.

Canada women's national soccer team

The Canada women's national soccer team (French: Équipe du Canada féminine de soccer) is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

The team reached international prominence at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, losing in the third place match to the United States. Canada qualified for its first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 2008, making it to the quarterfinals. Canada are two-time CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions, and two-time Olympic bronze medalists from London 2012 where they defeated France 1–0 in Coventry and from Rio de Janeiro 2016, after defeating hosts Brazil 2–1 in São Paulo.A certain segment of the Canadian women's soccer fans are closely linked to the U-20 team (U-19 prior to 2006), partly due to Canada hosting the inaugural FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship in 2002, a tournament in which the team won silver in front of 47,784 fans at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta. Canada also hosted the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they were eliminated in the quarterfinals by England. Canada set the tournament and team record for attendance in the process, with 1,353,506 and 54,027 respectively.

Canada women's national under-17 soccer team

The Canada U-17 women's national soccer team is a youth soccer team operated under the Canadian Soccer Association. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the senior national team. The team's most recent major tournament was the 2018 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship, which was postponed after Canada had played one match due to civil unrest in Nicaragua. Following the resumption of the tournament, Canada placed third and qualified for the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

Canada women's national under-20 soccer team

The Canada U-20 women's national soccer team is a youth soccer team operated under the Canadian Soccer Association. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the full women's national team. Their most recent major competition was the 2018 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship.

Canadian Championship

The Canadian Championship (French: Championnat canadien) is an annual soccer tournament contested by premier Canadian professional teams. The winner is awarded the Voyageurs Cup and Canada's berth in the CONCACAF Champions League. It is currently contested by MLS sides Toronto FC, Vancouver Whitecaps FC, and Montreal Impact, USL Championship side Ottawa Fury FC, all seven Canadian Premier League sides, and the champions of League1 Ontario and the Première Ligue de soccer du Québec. The tournament is organized by the Canadian Soccer Association. In Canada, it is broadcast on OneSoccer and on TSN/RDS.

Canadian soccer league system

The Canadian soccer league system, also called the Canadian soccer pyramid, is a term used in soccer to describe the structure of the league system in Canada. The governing body of soccer in the country is the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA), which oversees the system and domestic cups (including the Canadian Championship) but does not operate any of its component leagues. For practical purposes, Canadian teams are often members of leagues that are based primarily in the United States.

David Forsyth (soccer)

David Forsyth (December 15, 1852 – September 14, 1936) was a Canadian educator and soccer player and administrator. A member of the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame, he is known as the "Father of Canadian Soccer".

Frederick Stambrook

Dr. Frederick George Stambrook (November 16, 1929 – 2005) was a president of the Manitoba Soccer Association and the Canadian Soccer Association.

He moved to England as a refugee at the age of nine where he lived and studied, achieving a B.A. Honours from Oxford University and a PHD from the University of London. Later he moved to Australia and then to Winnipeg, where he became involved in his son's soccer program at the Crescentwood Community Centre, leading to his founding of the Manitoba Minor Soccer Association. He moved on to become president of the Canadian Minor Soccer Association and in 1980 president of the Manitoba Soccer Association. In 1986, he became the 27th president of the Canadian Soccer Association and during his six years in this post contributed to the game in Canada and abroad.

He was the Host-President of the FIFA U-17 World Tournament in Toronto in 1987, an active proponent of women's soccer and helped found the national women's team. He served on the FIFA Appeals Committee at the Los Angeles Olympics and the 1994 World Cup.

He was made a Life Member of the CSA, and was inducted into the Manitoba Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame. He gave over three decades of service to soccer and at the same time, to his University, where he was a popular professor of History.

He died on July 2005, and on April 2006 he was inducted as a Builder into the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame.

Inter-Provincial Cup (soccer)

The Inter-Provincial Cup was a soccer competition organized by the Canadian Soccer Association. It was contested between the men's champions of the Première Ligue de soccer du Québec and League1 Ontario, Canada's only domestic Division 3 soccer leagues. The competition was created in 2014.The 2017 edition was cancelled when it was announced that the champions of the two leagues would play against each other in the 2018 Canadian Championship. From the 2019 Canadian Championship onward, a draw takes place in which the PLSQ and L1O entrant cannot be drawn against each other in the first round. However, it is possible that they could play each other in further rounds.

List of Canada women's international soccer players

The Canada women's national soccer team represents the country of Canada in international soccer. It is fielded by the Canada Soccer Association, the governing body of soccer in Canada, and competes as a member of the CONCACAF, which encompasses the countries of North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean region. Canada competed in their first official international football match on July 7, 1986, a 2–0 defeat to the United States national team in Blaine, Minnesota.Canada have competed in numerous competitions, and all players, either as a member of the starting eleven or as a substitute, are listed below. Each player's details include the number of caps earned and goals scored in all international matches, and opponent of their first and last matches played in (a blank in the "last cap" column indicates an active player who has been called up in the last 12 months), ordered alphabetically. All statistics are correct up to and including the match played on June 24, 2019. Players that are still active at the club and/or international level are in bold.

North American SuperLiga

The SuperLiga was an official North American association football competition between teams from the Liga MX of Mexico and Major League Soccer of the United States and Canada, the top divisions in each country. The competition was sanctioned by CONCACAF, U.S. Soccer, the Canadian Soccer Association and Federación Mexicana de Fútbol and served as the sub-regional championship for the North American section of CONCACAF, much like its Central American and Caribbean counterparts, the Copa Interclubes UNCAF and CFU Club Championship respectively. The tournament was first held in 2007 and was cancelled in March 2011.

Soccer in Canada

Soccer in Canada is the most popular sport in terms of participation rate. According to FIFA's Big Count, 2,695,712 people played in Canada in 2006. Professional soccer in Canada is played in Major League Soccer, the United Soccer League, and the Canadian Premier League. Canada also has many semi-professional and amateur soccer leagues. Canada's men's and women's national soccer teams are ranked 79th and 5th respectively in the FIFA World Rankings, as of September 3, 2018.

Victor Montagliani

Victor Montagliani (Italian: [montaʎˈʎaːni]; born September 12, 1965) is a Canadian businessman, soccer executive, and the president of CONCACAF. He is a member of the FIFA Council.

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