Canadian Screen Awards

The Canadian Screen Awards (French: Les prix Écrans canadiens) are awards given annually by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television recognizing excellence in Canadian film, English-language television, and digital media productions.[1] The new awards were first presented in 2013 as the result of a merger of the Gemini Awards and Genie Awards—the Academy's previous awards presentations for television (English-language) and film productions.[2]

They are widely considered to be the most prestigious award for Canadian entertainers, artists, and filmmakers, often referred to as the equivalent of the Oscars and Emmy Awards in the United States, the BAFTA Awards in the United Kingdom, the AACTA Awards in Australia, and the IFTA Awards in Ireland.[3][4][5][6][7]

Canadian Screen Awards
6th Canadian Screen Awards
Canadian Screen Award trophy
Awarded forBest television, film, and digital media productions in Canada
CountryCanada
Presented byAcademy of Canadian Cinema & Television
First awarded2013
Websiteacademy.ca/awards

History

The award's historic roots stem from the Canadian Film Awards, which were presented for film from 1949 to 1978, and the ACTRA Awards, which were presented for television from 1972 to 1986. The Academy took over the CFAs in 1978 to create the new Genie Awards, and took over the ACTRAs in 1986 to create the Gemini Awards.

In April 2012, the Academy announced that it would merge the Geminis and the Genies into a new awards show that would better recognize Canadian accomplishments in film, television, and digital media.[8] On September 4, 2012, the Academy announced that the new ceremony would be known as the Canadian Screen Awards, reflecting the multi-platform nature of the presentation's expanded scope and how Canadians consume media content.[9] The inaugural ceremony, hosted by comedian Martin Short and broadcast by CBC Television, took place on March 3, 2013.[10][11]

Due to the number of awards presented, many of the less prominent awards are presented at a series of untelevised galas during Canadian Screen Week, the week leading up to the televised ceremonies. On the night of the main gala, the ceremony also starts approximately two hours earlier than the telecast, with additional awards being presented whose winners are included in short montages during the main ceremony, and only the most important film and television categories are presented during the live broadcast.

Name

As of 2018, the Academy has not yet announced an official nickname, such as "Oscar" for the Academy Awards.[12] Many Canadian television and film critics and others have suggested potential nicknames, including the straightforward abbreviation "Screenies";[12] tributes to film and television legends including "Candys" in memory of actor John Candy,[13] "Pickfords" in honour of actress Mary Pickford and "Normans" in honour of director Norman Jewison;[13] "Angels" as a descriptive reference to the trophy's "wings";[14] and "Gemininies" as a portmanteau of the awards' former names.[12]

The Academy invited suggestions from viewers via social media, with CEO Helga Stephenson suggesting that the board would consider the suggestions and potentially announce a naming choice in time for the 2014 ceremony.[13] No formal nickname was announced at the time; numerous media outlets settled on the informal "Screenies".[15][16]

At the 4th Canadian Screen Awards in 2016, host Norm Macdonald called in his opening monologue for the awards to be named the Candys;[17] several presenters and winners followed his lead throughout the evening, referring to the award as "The Candy" in their presentation announcements or acceptance speeches, and John Candy's former SCTV colleagues Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara both endorsed Macdonald's proposal in the press room.[18] Macdonald had not sought input from the Academy itself prior to his monologue, although he ran the idea past the ceremony's broadcast producer Barry Avrich.[14] At the 5th Canadian Screen Awards in 2017, host Howie Mandel offered his own nickname proposal, suggesting that the awards be dubbed the "STDs" to stand for "Screen, Television and Digital", although his suggestion was less positively received.[19]

Awards ceremonies

Ceremony Date Best Motion Picture Best Dramatic Series Best Comedy Series Host Location Broadcaster
1st March 3, 2013 War Witch (Rebelle) Flashpoint Less Than Kind Martin Short Sony Centre for the Performing Arts CBC
2nd March 9, 2014 Gabrielle Orphan Black Call Me Fitz
3rd March 1, 2015 Mommy Andrea Martin Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts
4th March 13, 2016 Room 19-2 Schitt's Creek Norm Macdonald Sony Centre for the Performing Arts
5th March 12, 2017 It's Only the End of the World (Juste la fin du monde) Orphan Black Letterkenny Howie Mandel
6th March 11, 2018 Maudie Anne Kim's Convenience Jonny Harris & Emma Hunter
7th March 31, 2019 TBA

Awards categories

The Canadian Screen Awards has 134 categories in total. There are 24 film categories, 100 television categories, and 10 digital media categories. As with the Genie Awards, all Canadian films, regardless of language, are eligible to receive awards in the film categories. However, as with the Gemini Awards, only English-language productions are eligible for television categories: the Academy continues to hold the Prix Gémeaux, a separate ceremony honouring French-language television productions.[8]

Film

Television

  • Best Direction in a Dramatic Series
  • Best Direction in a Dramatic Program or Limited Series
  • Best Direction in a Comedy Program or Series
  • Best Direction in an Animated Program or Series
  • Best Direction in a Children's or Youth Program or Series
  • Best Direction in a Documentary or Factual Series
  • Best Direction in a Documentary Program
  • Best Direction in a Lifestyle or Information Program or Series
  • Best Direction in a Live Sporting Event
  • Best Direction in a Reality/Competition Program or Series
  • Best Direction in a Variety or Sketch Comedy Program or Series
  • Best Achievement in Casting
  • Best Actor in a Continuing Leading Dramatic Role
  • Best Actress in a Continuing Leading Dramatic Role
  • Best Actor in a Leading Role in a Dramatic Program or Limited Series
  • Best Actress in a Leading Role in a Dramatic Program or Limited Series
  • Best Supporting Actor in a Dramatic Program or Series
  • Best Supporting Actress in a Dramatic Program or Series
  • Best Guest Performance in a Dramatic Series
  • Best Actor in a Continuing Leading Comedic Role
  • Best Actress in a Continuing Leading Comedic Role
  • Best Supporting or Guest Actor in a Comedic Series
  • Best Supporting or Guest Actress in a Comedic Series
  • Best Performance in an Animated Program or Series
  • Best Performance in a Children's or Youth Program or Series
  • Best Performance in a Variety or Sketch Comedy Program or Series (Individual or Ensemble)
  • Best Host in a Lifestyle, Talk or Entertainment News Program or Series
  • Best Host in a Variety or Reality/Competition Program or Series
  • Best Host or Interviewer in a News or Information Program or Series
  • Best News Anchor, National
  • Best News Anchor, Local
  • Best Sports Analyst
  • Best Sports Host
  • Best Sports Play-by-Play Announcer
  • Best Writing in a Dramatic Series
  • Best Writing in a Dramatic Program or Limited Series
  • Best Writing in a Comedy Program or Series
  • Best Writing in an Animated Program or Series
  • Best Writing in a Children's or Youth Program or Series
  • Best Writing in a Documentary Program or Series
  • Best Writing in a Factual Program or Series
  • Best Writing in a Lifestyle or Reality/Competition Program or Series
  • Best Writing in a Variety or Sketch Comedy Program or Series
  • Barbara Sears Award for Best Editorial Research
  • Barbara Sears Award for Best Visual Research
  • Best Production Design/Art Direction in a Fiction Program or Series
  • Best Production Design/Art Direction in a Non-Fiction Program or Series
  • Best Photography in a Dramatic Program or Series
  • Best Photography in a Comedy Program or Series
  • Best Photography in a Documentary Program or Factual Series
  • Best Photography in a Lifestyle or Reality/Competition Program or Series
  • Best Photography in a News or Information Program, Series or Segment
  • Best Photography in a Variety Program or Series
  • Best Costume Design
  • Best Picture Editing in a Dramatic Program or Series
  • Best Picture Editing in a Comedy Program or Series
  • Best Picture Editing in a Documentary Program or Series
  • Best Picture Editing in a Factual Program or Series
  • Best Picture Editing in a Reality/Competition Program or Series
  • Best Picture Editing in a Variety or Sketch Comedy Program or Series
  • Best Sound in a Comedy or Dramatic Program or Series
  • Best Sound in a Non-Fiction Program or Series
  • Best Sound in a Variety or Animated Program or Series
  • Best Original Music for a Non-Fiction Program or Series
  • Best Original Music Score for a Series
  • Best Original Music Score for a Program
  • Best Makeup
  • Best Visual Effects

Digital Media

  • Best Cross-Platform Project – Children's and Youth
  • Best Cross-Platform Project – Fiction
  • Best Cross-Platform Project – Non-Fiction
  • Best Immersive Experience
  • Best Original Interactive Production Produced for Digital Media
  • Best Original Program or Series Produced for Digital Media – Fiction
  • Best Original Program or Series Produced for Digital Media – Non-Fiction
  • Best Direction in a Program or Series Produced for Digital Media
  • Best Actor in a Program or Series Produced for Digital Media
  • Best Actress in a Program or Series Produced for Digital Media
  • Social Innovator Award

Special Awards

References

  1. ^ "L'Académie lance les nouveaux prix Écrans canadiens" (Press release). L'Académie canadienne du cinéma et de la télévision. 2012-09-04. Retrieved 2013-01-16.
  2. ^ "Goodbye Genies and Geminis, hello Canadian Screen Awards". The GATE. The GATE Entertainment Magazine. Retrieved 2015-12-21.
  3. ^ "Canadian Screen Awards highlights: little suspense, but lots of fun". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2015-12-21.
  4. ^ "Controversy and The Canadian Screen Awards". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 2015-12-21.
  5. ^ "Canadian Crossing: American and British stars clean up at the Genies, Canada's 'Oscars'". balanceoffood.typepad.com. Retrieved 2015-12-21.
  6. ^ Shatner, William; Regan, Chris (2011-10-04). Shatner Rules: Your Guide to Understanding the Shatnerverse and the World at Large. Penguin. ISBN 9781101547984.
  7. ^ "Canada's female directors eye Oscar race". CTVNews. Retrieved 2015-12-21.
  8. ^ a b "Canada's Genie, Gemini Awards to merge". CBC News. Retrieved 5 September 2012.
  9. ^ "Canadian Academy unveils Canadian Screen Awards". ScreenDaily. Retrieved 5 September 2012.
  10. ^ "Canadian Screen Awards to replace Genies, Geminis". CBC News. Retrieved 5 September 2012.
  11. ^ "Martin Short makes Canadian Screen Awards a night to remember". Toronto Star. 4 March 2013. Retrieved 4 March 2013.
  12. ^ a b c "Goodbye Genies and Geminis, hello Canadian Screen Awards". The Gate, March 2, 2013.
  13. ^ a b c "Canadian Screen Awards nickname the ‘Candys’ gains traction". Toronto Star, March 4, 2013.
  14. ^ a b "Chair of Canadian film/TV academy is sweet on calling awards ‘the Candys’". Toronto Star, March 14, 2016.
  15. ^ "The Screenies Are Upon Us!". Now, January 13, 2015.
  16. ^ "Canada's Screenie nominations announced". Winnipeg Free Press, January 14, 2015.
  17. ^ "Room takes Best Film at Canadian Screen Awards". Toronto Star, March 13, 2016.
  18. ^ "'The Candy' gains traction as nickname for the Canadian Screen Awards". CTV News, March 14, 2016.
  19. ^ "Lurching from boring to weird, Canadian Screen Awards did produce notable moments". The Globe and Mail, March 13, 2017.

External links

1st Canadian Screen Awards

The 1st Canadian Screen Awards were held on March 3, 2013, to honour achievements in Canadian film and television production in 2012. This was the first-ever Canadian Screen Awards ceremony, following the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television's decision, announced in 2012, to merge its formerly separate Genie Awards (for film) and Gemini Awards (for television) into a single ceremony. In addition, the Canadian Screen Awards include awards for achievements in digital media.Nominations were announced on January 15, 2013. The awards ceremony was hosted by Martin Short.

2nd Canadian Screen Awards

The 2nd Canadian Screen Awards were held on March 9, 2014, to honour achievements in Canadian film and television production in 2013. Awards in technical and some other categories were presented in a series of advance ceremonies during the week of March 3 to 8.Nominations were announced on January 13, 2014. In film, Denis Villeneuve's Enemy led with nominations in 10 categories, while on the television side the science fiction series Orphan Black was nominated in 14 categories.The awards ceremony were hosted by Martin Short, at the Sony Centre for the Performing Arts in Toronto, Ontario, and marked the 65th anniversary of the creation of the original Canadian Film Awards.

3rd Canadian Screen Awards

The 3rd Canadian Screen Awards were held on March 1, 2015, to honour achievements in Canadian film, television and digital media production in 2014.Nominations were announced on January 13, 2015. On the film side, Mommy led with 13 nominations, while on the television side the science fiction series Orphan Black also received 13 nominations.

The awards ceremony were hosted by Andrea Martin at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts in Toronto, Ontario. Awards in many of the technical categories were presented in a series of galas over the week before the main ceremony.

Changes to the awards over previous years included the introduction of new categories for Best Cinematography in a Documentary and Best Editing in a Documentary.

4th Canadian Screen Awards

The 4th Canadian Screen Awards was held on March 13, 2016, to honour achievements in Canadian film, television, and digital media production in 2015.Nominations were announced on January 19, 2016. Awards in many of the technical categories were presented in a series of galas over the week before the main ceremony.

During the ceremony, host Norm Macdonald suggested the award be called the Candy in honour of late Canadian actor John Candy, comparable to the Academy Awards long being known as Oscars. The nickname has still not been officially adopted by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television, although Academy chair Martin Katz personally endorsed it in a follow-up interview with the Toronto Star.

5th Canadian Screen Awards

The 5th annual Canadian Screen Awards were held on March 12, 2017, to honour achievements in Canadian film, television, and digital media production in 2016. Nominations were announced on January 17, 2017.Awards in many of the technical categories were presented in a series of galas, collectively called Canadian Screen Week, in the days leading up to the main ceremony. At the main ceremony, the film It's Only the End of the World and the television series Orphan Black won the most awards in film and television categories, with six and nine awards, respectively.

6th Canadian Screen Awards

The 6th annual Canadian Screen Awards were held on March 11, 2018, to honour achievements in Canadian film, television, and digital media production in 2017. Nominations were announced on January 16.The awards in many of the technical and craft categories were presented in a series of advance galas on March 6, 7 and 8.

7th Canadian Screen Awards

The 7th annual Canadian Screen Awards will be held on March 31, 2019, to honour achievements in Canadian film, television, and digital media production in 2018. The awards in many of the technical and craft categories will be presented in a series of advance Canadian Screen Week galas in the week before the main ceremony.The Academy has announced that the ceremony will have no overall host, indicating that the decision was made before the Academy Awards made the same announcement. The ceremony will, however, include pretaped comedy segments.

Nominations were announced by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television on February 7.

Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television Diversity Award

The Diversity Award is presented by Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television to honour excellence in English-language television programming that "reflects the racial and cultural diversity of Canada." It was introduced in 1988 as the Multiculturalism Award under the umbrella of the Gemini Awards, and renamed to the Canada Award in 1996.

Since 2013, the award has been presented as part of the new Canadian Screen Awards program. It was renamed to its current name in 2014.

National Film Board of Canada productions and co-productions have won approximately half of all Canada Awards.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Actress

The Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television presents an annual award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role to the best performance by a lead actress in a Canadian film. The award was first presented in 1968 by the Canadian Film Awards, and was presented annually until 1978 with the exception of 1969, when no eligible feature films were submitted for award consideration, and 1974 due to the cancellation of the awards that year.

From 1980 until 2012, the award was presented as part of the Genie Awards ceremony; since 2013, it has been presented as part of the Canadian Screen Awards.

From 1980 to 1983, only Canadian actresses were eligible for the award; non-Canadian actresses appearing in Canadian films were instead considered for the separate Genie Award for Best Performance by a Foreign Actress. After 1983, the latter award was discontinued, and from 1986 both Canadian and foreign actresses were eligible for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography

The Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television presents an annual award for Best Achievement in Cinematography, to honour the best Canadian film cinematography.

The award was first presented in 1963 as part of the Canadian Film Awards, with separate categories for colour and black-and-white cinematography; the separate categories were discontinued after 1969, with only a single category presented through the 1970s. After 1978, the award was presented as part of the new Genie Awards; since 2012, it has been presented as part of the Canadian Screen Awards. In early years, the award could be presented for either narrative feature or documentary films, although this was discontinued later on and only feature films were eligible. Beginning with the 3rd Canadian Screen Awards, a separate category was introduced for Best Cinematography in a Documentary.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography in a Documentary

The Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography in a Documentary is an annual award, presented as part of the Canadian Screen Awards program to honour the year's best cinematography in a documentary film. It is presented separately from the Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography for feature films.

The award was presented for the first time at the 3rd Canadian Screen Awards.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Editing

The Genie Award for Best Achievement in Editing is awarded by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television to the best Canadian film editor in a feature film.

Beginning with the 3rd Canadian Screen Awards, a separate category was introduced for Best Editing in a Documentary.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Editing in a Documentary

The Canadian Screen Award for Best Editing in a Documentary is an annual award, presented as part of the Canadian Screen Awards program to honour the year's best editing in a documentary film. It is presented separately from the Canadian Screen Award for Best Editing for feature films.

The award was presented for the first time at the 3rd Canadian Screen Awards.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Overall Sound

The Canadian Screen Award for Best Achievement in Overall Sound is awarded by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television to the best work by a sound designer in a Canadian film.

Catherine O'Hara

Catherine Anne O'Hara (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian-American actress, writer, and comedian. She first drew notice as an actress in 1974 as a member of The Second City improvisational comedy troupe in Toronto. She landed her first significant television role in 1975 starring opposite John Candy and Dan Aykroyd in the main cast of the Canadian sitcom Coming Up Rosie (1975–1978). The following year, she and Candy began work on Second City Television (1976–84), where she drew acclaim for both her work as a comedic actress and writer, winning a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series in 1981.

O'Hara has appeared in several films directed by Tim Burton, beginning with the role of Delia Deetz in the 1988 film Beetlejuice. Other roles she has portrayed in Burton films include the voices of Sally/Shock in The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) and Susan Frankenstein in Frankenweenie (2012). She has also frequently collaborated with director and writer Christopher Guest, appearing in the mockumentary films Waiting for Guffman (1996), Best in Show (2000), A Mighty Wind (2003), and For Your Consideration (2006). In 2000, she won a Genie Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role for the film The Life Before This. She is also known to audiences as Kate McCallister, the mother of Kevin, in both Home Alone (1990) and Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992).

In 2010 O'Hara was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie and the Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film for her portrayal of Aunt Ann in Temple Grandin opposite Claire Danes. For her work on the television series Schitt's Creek (2015–present), O'Hara has won two Canadian Screen Awards for Best Lead Actress in a Comedy Series, at the 4th Canadian Screen Awards in 2016 and the 5th Canadian Screen Awards in 2017.Her other notable television appearances include the recurring roles of Dr. Georgina Orwell in the Netflix series A Series of Unfortunate Events and Carol Ward in Six Feet Under, and the voices of Jackie Martin in Glenn Martin, DDS, Miss Malone in The Completely Mental Misadventures of Ed Grimley, Kaossandra in Skylanders Academy and Liz Larsen in Committed. She has also hosted Saturday Night Live twice during her career and made numerous guest appearances on sitcoms, variety shows, and late night television.

Earle Grey Award

The Earle Grey Award is the lifetime achievement award for television acting of the Canadian Screen Awards, and its predecessor the Gemini Awards. The award is named for the first president of ACTRA's Toronto branch. It can be presented to an individual or collaborative team (such as SCTV or Royal Canadian Air Farce).

Nominations for the award are presented by professionals within the Canadian television community and the decision of who will win the award is made by a special committee.

Genie Awards

The Genie Awards were given out annually by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television to recognize the best of Canadian cinema from 1980–2012. They succeeded the Canadian Film Awards (1949–1978; also known as the "Etrog Awards," for sculptor Sorel Etrog, who designed the statuette).Genie Award candidates were selected from submissions made by the owners of Canadian films or their representatives, based on the criteria laid out in the Genie Rules and Regulations booklet which is distributed to Academy members and industry members. Peer-group juries, assembled from volunteer members of the Academy, meet to screen the submissions and select a group of nominees. Academy members then vote on these nominations.

In 2012, the Academy announced that the Genies would merge with its sister presentation for English-language television, the Gemini Awards, to form a new award presentation known as the Canadian Screen Awards.

Golden Screen Award (Canada)

The Golden Screen Award, formerly known as the Golden Reel Award, is a Canadian film award, presented to the Canadian film with the biggest box office gross of the year. The Canadian Motion Picture Distributors Association introduced this award in 1976 as part of the Canadian Film Awards until 1979. The Golden Reel became part of the Genie Awards ceremonies in 1980, and is currently part of the Canadian Screen Awards. It was renamed from Golden Reel to Golden Screen as of the 3rd Canadian Screen Awards in 2015.

As the economics of Canadian film production mean that the year's top-grossing Canadian film is often a francophone film from Quebec, the award often — although not always — goes to the same film as the Billet d'or (Golden Ticket), which is presented by the Jutra Awards to the top-grossing film from Quebec.

In 2015, the Academy also introduced Golden Screen Awards for fiction and reality television, to honour the highest-rated Canadian television shows in each category.

Rob Stewart Award

The Rob Stewart Award, formerly known as the Gemini/Canadian Screen Award for Best Science or Nature Documentary Program, is a Canadian television award, presented by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television to honour the year's best television documentary on a scientific or nature topic. Formerly presented as part of the Gemini Awards, since 2013 it has been presented as part of the Canadian Screen Awards.

The award was renamed to its current name in 2017 in memory of Rob Stewart, an influential Canadian director of science and nature documentary films who died in January 2017.

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