Canadian Football Hall of Fame

The Canadian Football Hall of Fame is a not-for-profit corporation, located in Hamilton, Ontario, that celebrates great achievements in Canadian football. It is maintained by the Canadian Football League (CFL). It includes displays about the CFL, Canadian university football and Canadian junior football history.[1]

The Hall previously had a main feature in the central portion of the museum where inducted members, each with a metal bust depicting their head, were displayed prior to the physical building being closed. There were also featured displays that highlight each CFL team's history, and an interactive field goal kicking exhibit. The CFHOF is currently changing to a de-centralized model, which does not included a main museum building (see "Today" below).

Once during every CFL season, the Hall sponsors the induction ceremony of former players. Included in the "Hall of Fame Weekend" is a regular season game, usually (but not always) affiliated with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. Traditionally, the inducted players will come to the Hall and make an acceptance speech in front of the building where their newly sculpted bust is unveiled. A player must be retired from the game for at least three years before being eligible for consideration.[2] A Hall of Fame voting committee is composed of sports writers, selected CFL executives and inducted members.[3]

Canadian Football Hall of Fame and Museum
CFL Hamilton
Established1972
LocationHamilton, Ontario, Canada.
TypeCanadian football museum
DirectorMark DeNobile
CuratorMeghan Sturgeon Archer
Websitewww.cfhof.ca
Statue touchdown cfhof
Touchdown sculpture.

History

The Canadian Hall of Fame officially opened on November 28, 1972. It is located in downtown Hamilton, beside the former Hamilton City Hall and Family Courts Building, which is inside the former Andrew Carnegie library on Main Street, between Bay Street and MacNab Street. The Canadian Hall of Fame was awarded to the City of Hamilton in June 1963 following the invitation of Mayor Lloyd Douglas Jackson. The Hamilton Parks Board offered a space near Civic Stadium. Ivan Miller, former sports editor of The Spectator, was named the first curator. Soon after, the Board of Education purchased the land and building. The Hall moved to this location in 1972 and closed on September 19, 2015. In 2015, responsibility for the museum moved from the City of Hamilton to the CFL.[4]

Today

The old Canadian Hall of Fame building was easily identified by the slightly-larger-than-life metal sculpture Touchdown, featuring a successful receiver being tackled. As of May 2018, this sculpture will be moved to Tim Hortons Field Gate 3.[5] Tim Hortons Field will also have 3 display areas - the Grey Cup display at Gate 3, the Media Hall of Fame Wing in the press box area, and the main display area in the premium level concourse. The main display area will feature all 296 busts (as of March 2018) and rotating displays of various artifacts. The displays will be accessible during Hamilton Tiger-Cats home games (club level display open to all ticket holders 15 minutes after the end of the game), as well as Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings to the public at no charge.[6] The CFHOF is also building travelling displays for different CFL team home fields, the Grey Cup, and other events.[7]

Canadian Football Hall of Famers

* denotes deceased

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

CFL Lancaster
Ron Lancaster,
Canadian Football Hall of Fame

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Y

Z

Football Reporters of Canada wing

There is also a wing of the Hall of Fame dedicated to reporters.

Inductees

Gallery

CanadianFootballHallofFame

The Canadian Football Hall of Fame in Hamilton, Ontario.

CFL Hamilton C

Front entrance

CFL Hamilton A

Touchdown Sculpture

CFL Hamilton B

Canadian Football Hall of Fame

See also

References

  1. ^ "Canadian Football Hall of Fame and Museum". The Canadian Encyclopedia
  2. ^ Canadian Football Hall of Fame Nomination Form, April 12, 2010
  3. ^ Canadian Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee Archived 2017-02-14 at the Wayback Machine, Accessed February 2011
  4. ^ Urciuoli, Anthony (July 10, 2015). "Canadian Football Hall of Fame will relocate in 2016". AM900 CHML | Hamilton News. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  5. ^ "CANADIAN FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM TO OFFICIALLY RELAUNCH ON CLUB LEVEL AT TIM HORTONS FIELD IN 2018 – Hamilton Tiger-Cats". ticats.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-22.
  6. ^ "CANADIAN FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM TO OFFICIALLY RELAUNCH ON CLUB LEVEL AT TIM HORTONS FIELD IN 2018 – Hamilton Tiger-Cats". ticats.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-22.
  7. ^ "Canadian Football Hall of Fame closes for the last time Saturday". The Hamilton Spectator. 2015-09-18. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  8. ^ Ken Preston, 73, managed Saskatchewan Roughriders: [City Edition] Kitchener - Waterloo Record [Kitchener, Ont] 06 Aug 1991: A10.

External links

Coordinates: 43°15′19″N 79°52′20″W / 43.25522°N 79.87223°W

Bert Warwick

Arthur "Bert" Warwick (March 1901 – June 16, 1963) was a Canadian Football League head coach, league executive, and a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Warwick played quarterback at St. John's College. In 1934 he began coaching the Manitoba YMHA football team. Warwick then took over the reins at St. Paul's College and then served as an assistant coach with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. He served as the team's head coach in 1945 and led it to the Grey Cup final, losing out to the Toronto Argonauts.

He served as president of the Winnipeg Junior Bombers and later as chairman of the rules committee for the CFL and the Canadian Rugby Union for eight years. In all, he worked in Canadian football for more than five decades in one position or another. He was elected to the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1964. In 2004 he was elected to the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame

Bruce Coulter

Bruce Coulter (November 19, 1927 – June 5, 2018) was a Canadian football player and coach. He played ten seasons for the Montreal Alouettes, winning the Grey Cup in 1949. He then went on to coach 29 seasons for the Bishop's Gaiters. He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1997.

Carl Cronin

Carl M. Cronin was a quarterback who played two seasons in the Canadian Football League for the Winnipeg Pegs. He then was a head coach for the Calgary Bronks for five seasons. In 1967, he was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Earl Lunsford

Earl Lunsford (October 19, 1933 – September 3, 2008), known as the "Earthquake", was a fullback for the Calgary Stampeders and is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Earl Winfield

Earl Winfield (born August 6, 1961) is a former Canadian Football League receiver for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats who, in an 11-year career from 1987-1997, caught 573 passes for 10,119 yards and 75 touchdowns.

Winfield played college football at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1982 to 1985. He left as the all-time Tar Heel career leader in receptions, with 107.

On February 21, 2013 the Canadian Football Hall of Fame announced that Winfield would be inducted as a player at a ceremony in Edmonton in September, 2013.

Ed McQuarters

Eddie Lee McQuarters (born April 16, 1943 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a former defensive tackle (number 61) for the Saskatchewan Roughriders from 1966–1974. McQuarters was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1988.

Eddie James (Canadian football)

Eddie "Dynamite" James (September 30, 1907 – December 26, 1958) was a running back for the Regina Roughriders and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the Canadian Football League. James was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1963 and into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame and Museum in 2004. The Eddie James Memorial Trophy is named after him. His son Gerry James also played for the Blue Bombers and also is inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Grover Covington

Grover Covington (born March 25, 1956) is a former Canadian Football League defensive end for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats and member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Hec Crighton

Hector Naismith Crighton (April 2, 1900 – April 17, 1967) was a Canadian football coach. He coached 35 seasons of high school Canadian football, and he also rewrote the rule book in 1952. He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1986. The Hec Crighton Trophy, given each year to the outstanding CIS football player, is named after him.

John DeGruchy

John DeGruchy (December 15, 1860 – January 23, 1940) was the president of the Ontario Rugby Football Union for 25 years, and he promoted the Thanksgiving Day Classic between the Sarnia Imperials and the Toronto Balmy Beach Beachers. He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1963 and into the Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 1975.

Kaye Vaughan

Charles Kaye Vaughan (born June 30, 1931) is a former professional football player, a lineman with the Ottawa Rough Riders of the Canadian Football League for twelve seasons. He won the CFL's Outstanding Lineman Award in 1956 and 1957 and is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.Inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1978, Vaughan was voted 41st on the CFL's top 50 players in a poll conducted by Canadian sports network TSN, one of a few players from the 1950s who was included.

Ken Charlton (Canadian football)

Kenneth Charlton (1920–2004) was a running back for the Saskatchewan Roughriders, and is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, where he was elected in 1992. He was also named to the Roughriders Plaza of Honour and to the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Moe Racine

Maurice Joseph "Moe The Toe" Racine (October 13, 1937 – March 4, 2018) was a placekicker and offensive lineman for the Ottawa Rough Riders from 1958-1974 of the Canadian Football League. He was part of four Grey Cup winning teams with the Rough Riders and was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in the Class of 2014.

Paul Dojack

Paul Dojack (April 24, 1914 – November 7, 2007) was a Canadian CFL referee.

He officiated in 546 CFL games including 15 Grey Cup finals.

In 1978, he was inducted as a builder into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame and was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.

The Paul Dojack Youth Centre in Regina, Saskatchewan is named in his honour.

Peter Dalla Riva

Peter Dalla Riva (born December 11, 1946), is a former professional Canadian football player with the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League at the tight end and wide receiver positions. Dalla Riva played with the Alouettes for his entire 14-year career. He is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, and has had his jersey number #74 retired by the club.

Ron Atchison

Ron Atchison (April 21, 1930 – June 23, 2010) was a Canadian football defensive lineman who played for the Saskatchewan Roughriders from 1952 through 1968. He was part of the Grey Cup championship-winning Saskatchewan Roughriders in 1966. Atchison was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1978. He was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Born in Central Butte and raised in Saskatoon, Atchison played for the Saskatoon Hilltops from 1947 to 1949. In 1976, in recognition, the Hilltops named their practice field and permanent quarters after him.

During Atchison's time as a member of the Saskatchewan Roughriders, he was named to the CFL's Western All-Star team 6 times as a defensive tackle.

Rudy Phillips

Rudolph Phillips is a former professional Canadian football offensive lineman who played seven seasons in the Canadian Football League, mainly for the Ottawa Rough Riders. He played college football at North Texas University. He won the CFL's Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman Award in 1982 and 1983. He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 2009.

Tom Hinton

William Thomas Hinton (born 1936) is a former Canadian Football League offensive guard who played nine years for the BC Lions from 1958 to 1966. In 1991, he was enshrined into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Tony Anselmo (Canadian football)

Anthony Garry (Tony) Anselmo, (March 14, 1918 – November 10, 2009) was a community builder for the Calgary Stampeders Football Club of the Canadian Football League and was involved with the team from 1973 until 2009.

In 1978, he was made a Member of the Order of Canada "in recognition of his numerous services to Calgary". He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame as a builder in 2009.

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