Campo Lameiro

Campo Lameiro is a municipality in Galicia, Spain in the province of Pontevedra. Campo Lameiro is the Galician capital of rock art, with a large collection of petroglyphs located in the Archaeological Park of Campo Lameiro.

Campo Lameiro
municipality
P1070626 Casa concello Campo Lameiro
Official seal of Campo Lameiro

Seal
Campo Lameiro is located in Spain
Campo Lameiro
Campo Lameiro
Location in Spain
Coordinates: 42°32′32″N 8°32′34″W / 42.54222°N 8.54278°WCoordinates: 42°32′32″N 8°32′34″W / 42.54222°N 8.54278°W
CountrySpain
Autonomous communityGalicia
ProvincePontevedra
ComarcaPontevedra
Government
 • MayorJulio G Sayáns Bugallo
Area
 • Total63.82 km2 (24.64 sq mi)
Population
 (2018)[1]
 • Total1,806
 • Density28/km2 (73/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CET)

Location

The capital is A Lagoa, an entity belonging to the parish of Campo, which is 20 kilometers from the Pontevedra capital.

Parishes

The municipality is composed of 6 parishes comprising the following towns:

  • Parish of O Campo (San Miguel): A Lagoa, Campo Lameiro, Chacente, Morañó, Praderei and Alende.
  • Parish of O Couso (San Cristovo): Rozas, Castriño, Liñares, Fafide, Padín, Cimadevila and Castro de Orto.
  • Parish of Fragas (Santa Mariña): Laxe, Reboredo, As Cruces, Cerdeiras, Fontenla, Mullerboa, Redonde and Gargallóns.
  • Parish of Moimenta (Santa María): Moimenta, Lamosa, Painceiros, Paredes, Armonda and A Brea.
  • Parish of Montes (San Isidro): Parada and Fornelos.

Festivals

  • Festival of San Isidro Labrador (May 15)
  • Festival of Aguardiente (June)
  • Festival of San Antonio (June 13)
  • Festival of San Miguel (September 29)
  1. ^ "Municipal Register of Spain 2018". National Statistics Institute. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
Atlantic Bronze Age

The Atlantic Bronze Age is a cultural complex of the Bronze Age period of approximately 1300–700 BC that includes different cultures in Portugal, Andalusia, Galicia, France, Britain and Ireland.

Cerdedo

Cerdedo is a former municipality in Galicia, Spain in the province of Pontevedra.

Cotobade

Cotobade is a municipality in Galicia, Spain in the province of Pontevedra. It borders the municipalities of Campo Lameiro, Cerdedo, Forcarei, A Lama, Ponte Caldelas and Pontevedra. In 2011 its population was 4,432 people, according to the INE.

Cotobad is divided internally into several administrative divisions that match the name of parishes. Among the most prominent geographical features are the Lérez river, which flows through the lowlands of the municipality and its tributary and the river Almofrei. Of the mountains, the most prominent is Mount Seixo, one of the main mountains in Galicia.

The name of Cotobad apparently comes from "couto do abade." The whole region belonged to the old jurisdiction that exercised the Ranking of the Convent of Benedictine Tenorio.

Galicia (Spain)

Galicia (; Galician: Galicia [ɡaˈliθjɐ], Galiza [ɡaˈliθɐ]; Spanish: Galicia; Portuguese: Galiza) is an autonomous community of Spain and historic nationality under Spanish law. Located in the northwest Iberian Peninsula, it includes the provinces of A Coruña, Lugo, Ourense and Pontevedra.

Galicia is bordered by Portugal to the south, the Spanish autonomous communities of Castile and León and Asturias to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Cantabrian Sea to the north. It had a population of 2,701,743 in 2018 and a total area of 29,574 km2 (11,419 sq mi). Galicia has over 1,660 km (1,030 mi) of coastline, including its offshore islands and islets, among them Cíes Islands, Ons, Sálvora, Cortegada, and the largest and most populated, A Illa de Arousa.

The area now called Galicia was first inhabited by humans during the Middle Paleolithic period, and takes its name from the Gallaeci, the Celtic people living north of the Douro River during the last millennium BC. Galicia was incorporated into the Roman Empire at the end of the Cantabrian Wars in 19 BC, and was made a Roman province in the 3rd century AD. In 410, the Germanic Suebi established a kingdom with its capital in Braga (Portugal); this kingdom was incorporated into that of the Visigoths in 585. In 711, the Islamic Umayyad Caliphate invaded the Iberian Peninsula conquering the Visigoth kingdom of Hispania by 718, but soon Galicia was incorporated into the Christian kingdom of Asturias by 740. During the Middle Ages, the kingdom of Galicia was occasionally ruled by its own kings, but most of the time it was leagued to the kingdom of Leon and later to that of Castile, while maintaining its own legal and customary practices and culture. From the 13th century on, the kings of Castile, as kings of Galicia, appointed an Adiantado-mór, whose attributions passed to the Governor and Captain General of the Kingdom of Galiza from the last years of the 15th century. The Governor also presided the Real Audiencia do Reino de Galicia, a royal tribunal and government body. From the 16th century, the representation and voice of the kingdom was held by an assembly of deputies and representatives of the cities of the kingdom, the Cortes or Junta of the Kingdom of Galicia. This institution was forcibly discontinued in 1833 when the kingdom was divided into four administrative provinces with no legal mutual links. During the 19th and 20th centuries, demand grew for self-government and for the recognition of the culture of Galicia. This resulted in the Statute of Autonomy of 1936, soon frustrated by Franco's coup d'etat and subsequent long dictatorship. After democracy was restored the legislature passed the Statute of Autonomy of 1981, approved in referendum and currently in force, providing Galicia with self-government.

The interior of Galicia is characterized by a hilly landscape; mountain ranges rise to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) in the east and south. The coastal areas are mostly an alternate series of rías and cliffs. The climate of Galicia is usually temperate and rainy, with markedly drier summers; it is usually classified as Oceanic. Its topographic and climatic conditions have made animal husbandry and farming the primary source of Galicia's wealth for most of its history, allowing for a relative high density of population. With the exception of shipbuilding and food processing, Galicia was based on a farming and fishing economy until after the mid-20th century, when it began to industrialize. In 2018, the nominal gross domestic product was €62,900 million, with a nominal GDP per capita of €23,300. Galicia is characterised, unlike other Spanish regions, by the absence of a metropolis dominating the territory. Indeed, the urban network is made up of 7 main cities (the four provincial capitals A Coruña, Pontevedra, Ourense and Lugo, the political capital Santiago de Compostela and the industrial cities Vigo and Ferrol) and other small towns. The population is largely concentrated in two main areas: from Ferrol to A Coruña in the northern coast, and in the Rías Baixas region in the southwest, including the cities of Vigo, Pontevedra, and the interior city of Santiago de Compostela. There are smaller populations around the interior cities of Lugo and Ourense. The political capital is Santiago de Compostela, in the province of A Coruña. Vigo, in the province of Pontevedra, is the most populous municipality, with 292,817 (2016), while A Coruña is the most populous city, with 215,227 (2014).Two languages are official and widely used today in Galicia: the native Galician, a Romance language closely related to Portuguese with which it shares the Galician-Portuguese medieval literature; and Spanish, usually known locally as Castilian. While most Galicians are bilingual, a 2013 survey reported that 51% of the Galician population spoke Galician most often on a day-to-day basis, while 48% most often used Spanish.

List of municipalities in Pontevedra

This is a list of the 61 municipalities in the province of Pontevedra in the autonomous community of Galicia, Spain.

The Galician name is the sole official form of the name;

older or informal texts may use Castillan forms or spellings.

Lérez

The Lérez is a river in South West Galicia, Spain. The river meets the Atlantic Ocean at Pontevedra, where it creates Pontevedra's ria. The sources of the 60-kilometre (37 mi) long stream are in Serra do Candán, in the mountain of San Bieito, in the parish of Aciveiro (Forcarei). The Lérez passes through the communities of Forcarei, Cerdedo, Campo Lameiro, Cotobade and, finally, Pontevedra.

Its main tributaries are the Salgueiro, Cabaleiros, Grande, O Castro, Quireza, Tenorio and Almofrei.

Petroglyph

A petroglyph is an image created by removing part of a rock surface by incising, picking, carving, or abrading, as a form of rock art. Outside North America, scholars often use terms such as "carving", "engraving", or other descriptions of the technique to refer to such images. Petroglyphs are found worldwide, and are often associated with prehistoric peoples. The word comes from the Greek prefix petro-, from πέτρα petra meaning "stone", and γλύφω glýphō meaning "carve", and was originally coined in French as pétroglyphe.

Another form of petroglyph, normally found in literate cultures, a rock relief or rock-cut relief is a relief sculpture carved on "living rock" such as a cliff, rather than a detached piece of stone. While these relief carvings are a category of rock art, sometimes found in conjunction with rock-cut architecture, they tend to be omitted in most works on rock art, which concentrate on engravings and paintings by prehistoric or nonliterate cultures. Some of these reliefs exploit the rock's natural properties to define an image. Rock reliefs have been made in many cultures, especially in the ancient Near East. Rock reliefs are generally fairly large, as they need to be to make an impact in the open air. Most have figures that are larger than life-size.

Stylistically, a culture's rock relief carvings relate to other types of sculpture from period concerned. Except for Hittite and Persian examples, they are generally discussed as part of the culture's sculptural practice. The vertical relief is most common, but reliefs on essentially horizontal surfaces are also found. The term relief typically excludes relief carvings inside natural or human-made caves, that are common in India. Natural rock formations made into statues or other sculpture in the round, most famously at the Great Sphinx of Giza, are also usually excluded. Reliefs on large boulders left in their natural location, like the Hittite İmamkullu relief, are likely to be included, but smaller boulders described as stele or carved orthostats.

The term petroglyph should not be confused with petrograph, which is an image drawn or painted on a rock face. Both types of image belong to the wider and more general category of rock art or parietal art. Petroforms, or patterns and shapes made by many large rocks and boulders over the ground, are also quite different. Inuksuit are also not petroglyphs, they are human-made rock forms found only in the Arctic region.

Pontevedra

Pontevedra (Galician: [ˌpontɪˈβɛðɾɐ], Spanish: [ponteˈβeðɾa]) is a Spanish city in the north-west of the Iberian Peninsula. It is the capital of both the Comarca (County) and Province of Pontevedra, and of the Rias Baixas in Galicia. It is also the capital of its own municipality which is, in fact, often considered as an extension of the actual city.

In 1999, Pontevedra pedestrianized its 300,000 square meter medieval center by banning all but the essential automobile traffic. Pontevedra's car free center helped transform it into one of the most accessible cities, leading to awards for its urban quality: the international European prize, "Intermodes" in Brussels in 2013, the United Nations Habitat prize in Dubai in 2014 and the "Excellence Prize" of the Center for Active Design in New York City in 2015.Surrounded by hills, the city is located on the edge of an estuary at the mouth of the river Lérez by the sea, at the bottom of the Ría de Pontevedra, in the heart of the Rías Baixas. An economic centre and tourist destination, with a population of 82,946, it is at the head of an urban area around its Ria of more than 200,000 inhabitants comprising the municipalities of Poio, Marín, Sanxenxo, Bueu, Vilaboa, Cotobade, Ponte Caldelas, Barro and Soutomaior.

Pontevedra is the second city in Galicia for its rich heritage, only after Santiago de Compostela. A city of art and history, the city is known as "The Good City" or "The City of the Lérez". Pontevedra is the seat of the General provincial Council and the provincial district court as well as the provincial police station and the provincial administrative offices. The city is an important stopover on the Portuguese Way path of the Camino de Santiago that bears witness to the circular church of the Pilgrim's Virgin with a floor plan in the shape of a scallop shell.

Pontevedra (comarca)

Pontevedra is a comarca in the Galician Province of Pontevedra, Spain, and centred on the city of Pontevedra. It covers an area of 634.43 sq.km, and the overall population of this local region was 15,625 at the 2011 Census; the latest official estimate (as at the start of 2018) was 124,351.

Rivers of Galicia

The rivers of Galicia form part of a dense hydrographical network in the Spanish autonomous community of Galicia and has been described by Otero Pedrayo as “the land of a thousand rivers”. Most rivers are not deep enough to be navigable, although small boats are sailed in the lower courses of the River Minho and several others, as well as at many of the dams.

The rivers flowing into the Bay of Biscay (Cantabrian Sea) tend to be very short, and those flowing into the Atlantic Ocean are only a little longer, except for the Minho (340 km) and the Sil (225 km), whose lengths are several hundred kilometres. There are numerous rapids, due to the steep gradients of many river courses.

In addition to river fishing, rivers have been used to power mills, and dams have been constructed both to provide hydroelectric power and for storage of water.

Tercio de Gallegos

Tercio de Gallegos was a unit of Spanish Creole militias of Buenos Aires, created during the British invasions of the River Plate. It was composed mainly of militiamen from Galicia, its commander was Pedro Cerviño, born in Campo Lameiro, Pontevedra.The Third of Gallegos was dissolved in 1809, after the support of its members to Martín de Álzaga against the viceroy Santiago de Liniers. Towards 1807, this military unit had eight rifle companies, and one of Grenadiers in command of Jacobo Adrián Varela, who had an outstanding performance during the Combate del Retiro, occurred on July 5 of that year.

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