Cameron Worrell

Cameron Joseph Worrell (born December 14, 1979) is a former American football safety who played in the National Football League. He was originally signed by the Chicago Bears as an undrafted free agent in 2003. He played college football at Fresno State.

Worrell also played for the Miami Dolphins and was signed with the New York Jets.

Cameron Worrell is the son of Dale Worrell and Polly Welk Worrell. His grandfather, Richard Welk, is the nephew of famous band leader Lawrence Welk. He is also a distant relative of American swimmer Michael Worrell.

Cameron Worrell
No. 24, 44, 45
Position:Safety
Personal information
Born:December 14, 1979 (age 39)
Merced County, California
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:194 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school:Chowchilla (CA)
College:Fresno State
Undrafted:2003
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • North Sequoia League Offensive POY (1998)
  • First-team All-WAC (2002)
Career NFL statistics
Tackles:101
Sacks:2.0
Passes deflected:1
Forced fumbles:3
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Worrell was a two-year starter at both running back and safety at Chowchilla High School in Chowchilla, California. He earned North Sequoia League Offensive Player of the Year honors as a senior. He was also named to the All-Section team, gaining 1,300 yards on 160 carries with 16 touchdowns on offense and two interceptions on defense.

College career

Worrell originally attended Fresno State University, but did not play as a redshirt freshman in 1999 and subsequently transferred to Fresno City College where he helped the Rams to a perfect regular season.

As a junior in 2001, Worrell appeared in 14 games and recorded 31 tackles with two sacks, four tackles for a loss, two interceptions and one fumble recovery.

In his first year as a starter for Fresno State, Worrell earned All-Western Athletic Conference honors. He started all 14 games as a senior and led the Bulldogs with career-highs of 106 tackles and five interceptions, including one returned for a touchdown. He added four sacks, two forced fumbles, one fumble recovery and seven passes defensed on the year.

Professional career

First stint with Bears

Worrell was undrafted in the 2003 NFL Draft, but was signed by the Chicago Bears after a tryout during a post-draft minicamp. He was the only undrafted free agent to make the team out of training camp in 2003.

During his rookie season, Worrell saw action in 14 games on special teams and in a reserve role at safety. He recorded eight special teams tackles on the year and he also recovered an R.W. McQuarters fumble on a punt return.

Worrell played in 13 games during the 2004 season, amassing 16 tackles, a sack and a forced fumble. He missed the final two games of the season after being placed on Injured Reserve with an ankle injury.

A shoulder injury suffered in Week 3 of the preseason caused Worrell to miss the entire 2005 regular season.

Worrell had the best statistical year of his career to date in 2006. He appeared in all 16 games for the first time in his career and totaled 21 tackles, a sack, a forced fumble and three fumble recoveries. He played in a reserve role against the Indianapolis Colts in Super Bowl XLI, but did not accumulate any statistics.

Miami Dolphins

As an unrestricted free agent the following offseason, Worrell signed with the Miami Dolphins on March 8, 2007. He received a two-year contract from the team worth $2 million and including a $285,000 signing bonus. Worrell suffered a torn ACL in Week 13 and was placed on season-ending injured reserve.

The Dolphins waived Worrell on April 24, 2008 after he failed a physical.

New York Jets

Worrell signed with the New York Jets on June 8, 2008. He was assigned No. 45.

Chicago Bears (second stint)

Worrell after being injured for the whole 2008 season was signed on December 26, 2008 when Mike Brown was placed on injured reserve. He became a free agent following the season.

External links

2001 Fresno State Bulldogs football team

The 2001 Fresno State football team represented California State University, Fresno in the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season, and competed as a member of the Western Athletic Conference. Led by head coach Pat Hill, the Bulldogs played their home games at Bulldog Stadium in Fresno, California.

The quarterback was future NFL Draft #1 pick David Carr (American football).

2002 Fresno State Bulldogs football team

The 2002 Fresno State football team represented California State University, Fresno in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season, and competed as a member of the Western Athletic Conference. They played their home games at Bulldog Stadium in Fresno, California and were coached by Pat Hill.

2003 Chicago Bears season

The 2003 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 84th season in the National Football League. The team improved to a 7–9 over its 4–12 record from 2002,under head coach Dick Jauron. The team was once again in a quarterbacking carousel with quarterbacks Kordell Stewart, Chris Chandler, and rookie Rex Grossman. In the end, head coach Dick Jauron was fired after the conclusion of the season.

2004 Chicago Bears season

The 2004 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 85th season in the National Football League. The team failed to improve on their 7-9 record as they fell to a 5–11 record, under first-year head coach Lovie Smith. The team was once again in a quarterbacking carousel after the injury of starter Rex Grossman early on in the season. This was the team's eighth losing season in the past nine seasons.

According to statistics site Football Outsiders, the 2004 Bears had the third-worst offense, play-for-play, in their ranking history. Chicago's 231 points and 3,816 offensive yards were dead-last in the league in 2004. Their team quarterback passer rating was 61.7 for the year, also last.

The Bears started four different quarterbacks in 2004 – Chad Hutchinson, Craig Krenzel, Jonathan Quinn, and Rex Grossman. Grossman (the only Bears quarterback who would average more than 200 yards passing per game in 2004) would eventually establish himself as the starter, and two seasons later, would lead the Bears to their second NFC Championship and an appearance in the Super Bowl.

2006 Chicago Bears season

The 2006 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 87th season in the National Football League and 25th post-season completed in the National Football League. The Bears posted a 13–3 regular season record, the best in the NFC, improving on their previous year’s record of 11–5. The Bears retained their NFC North divisional title, and won the National Football Conference Championship title against the New Orleans Saints, on January 21, 2007. The Bears played the Indianapolis Colts at Super Bowl XLI, where they lost 29–17. They finished the 2006 NFL season tied for second in points scored, and third in points allowed.Due to the NFL's scheduling formula the Bears played 6 intra-division games, posting a record of 5–1. Because of rotating cycle scheduling, the Bears matched up against all four teams in the AFC East (going 2–2) and NFC West (going 4–0). In the remaining games, the Bears played the NFC's other reigning division winners, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New York Giants, posting a record of 2–0. During the entire season, the Bears played 10 games at home, 8 games on the road, and 1 game at a neutral field for the Super Bowl. Including the playoffs and Super Bowl, the Bears finished with a record of 15–4.

Noteworthy football stories for the 2006 season were replacing retired cornerback and kick returner Jerry Azumah, the quarterback controversy between productive but inconsistent and potentially fragile Rex Grossman and veteran free agent Brian Griese, the record setting returns by Devin Hester, Bernard Berrian's breakout season, competition between the Bears' running backs (Cedric Benson and Thomas Jones), and 5th round draft pick Mark Anderson's 12 quarterback sacks as a rookie.

2006 Chicago Bears–Arizona Cardinals game

On October 16, 2006, during the sixth week of the National Football League (NFL) regular season, the Chicago Bears defeated the Arizona Cardinals, 24–23, at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona. The undefeated Bears staged the "comeback of the year" against the 1-win Cardinals after trailing by 20 points at halftime. This game is the first game in which the Bears won after trailing by 20 or more points since 1987 (they defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 27–26). According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it was the first win in Bears history in which they trailed by at least 20 points in the second half, and the Cardinals became the first team in NFL history to lose consecutive games in a season after being ahead by 14 or more points at the end of the first quarter in each of their games. The Bears also set an NFL record for the biggest comeback without scoring an offensive touchdown in league history. Cardinals quarterback Matt Leinart became the first quarterback in history to throw at least 2 touchdown passes in each of his first 2 career starts. The last time a team won after committing 6 turnovers was over 20 years prior.The postgame press conference was notable for Cardinals head coach Dennis Green's profanity-laced rant, highlighted by the quote "The Bears are who we thought they were". The game was ranked #6 on NFL Top 10 on NFL Network for Top Ten Greatest Comebacks of All Time under the title "Cardinals Blow It"/"Monday Night Meltdown", as well as Top Ten Meltdowns at #7.

2007 Chicago Bears season

The 2007 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 88th season in the National Football League. The season officially began on September 9, 2007 against the San Diego Chargers, and concluded on December 30 against the New Orleans Saints. The Bears entered the 2007 season as the National Football Conference Champions and had hopes of returning to the Super Bowl, but instead finished the season with a disappointing 7–9 record, thus missing the playoffs for the first time since 2004.

2007 Miami Dolphins season

The 2007 Miami Dolphins season was the 38th season for the team in the National Football League and 42nd season overall. The team nearly went winless for the season, but on December 16, the third to last game of the regular season, they beat the Baltimore Ravens, giving them a final record of 1–15. The Detroit Lions became the first team to go 0–16 the following season. Their only win of the season gave them the first pick in the 2008 NFL draft. They also failed to improve upon a 6–10 season in 2006. Under former head coach Nick Saban in a year that began with high hopes, Saban resigned from the Dolphins to become the head coach at the University of Alabama, after repeatedly saying he would stay with the Dolphins. The Dolphins entered 2007 in the process of rebuilding under new head coach Cam Cameron, the former offensive coordinator for the San Diego Chargers. The coaching staff underwent significant changes, with approximately twelve coaches newly hired or reassigned. Cameron also made various changes to the team's roster, with more than a dozen players being added or re-signed and just as many being released, traded or allowed to sign elsewhere. Six of the team's losses in 2007 were by margins of three points or less.

Since the 1970 AFL-NFL Merger and the league's expansion to 16 games in 1978, the 2007 Dolphins are the nearest team to have gone winless.

2008 Chicago Bears season

The 2008 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 89th regular season in the National Football League. They finished the 2008 season with a 9–7 record, improving upon their 7–9 record from the 2007 season. The Bears failed to qualify for the playoffs for the second consecutive season.

2009 Chicago Bears season

The 2009 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 90th season overall in the National Football League. The Bears had looked to improve upon their 9–7 record from 2008 and return to the playoffs for the first time since the 2006 season, but failed to do so for the third consecutive season. The team finished 7–9, and third in the NFC North. This season is Lovie Smith's sixth season as the team's head coach. The Bears played all their home games at Soldier Field.

2018 Fresno State Bulldogs football team

The 2018 Fresno State Bulldogs football team represented California State University, Fresno in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Bulldogs were led by second-year head coach Jeff Tedford and played their home games at Bulldog Stadium. They were a member of the Mountain West Conference in the West Division. They finished the season 12–2, 7–1 in Mountain West play to be champions of the West Division. They represented the West Division in the Mountain West Championship Game where they defeated Boise State to become Mountain West champions. They were invited to the Las Vegas Bowl where they defeated Arizona State. Their 12 wins are the most wins in a single season in school history.

2018 San Diego State Aztecs football team

The 2018 San Diego State Aztecs football team represented San Diego State University in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Aztecs were led by eighth-year head coach Rocky Long and played their home games at SDCCU Stadium. San Diego State was a member of the Mountain West Conference in the West Division. They finished the season 7–6, 4–4 in Mountain West play to finish in fourth place in the West Division. They were invited to the Frisco Bowl where they lost to Ohio.

Chowchilla, California

Chowchilla is a city in Madera County, California. The city's population was 18,720 at the 2010 United States Census, up from 11,127 at the 2000 U.S. Census. Chowchilla is located 15 miles (24 km) northwest of Madera, at an elevation of 240 feet (73 m). It is a principal city of the Madera–Chowchilla metropolitan statistical area.The city is the location of two California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation facilities, the Central California Women's Facility and Valley State Prison.

Fresno City College

Fresno City College (FCC or "Fresno City") is a community college in Fresno, California. It is part of the State Center Community College District (SCCCD) within the California Community Colleges system. Fresno City College operates on a semester schedule, offering Associate degrees and certificates.

The school's sister colleges in the State Center District are Reedley College, located in Reedley, California, and Clovis Community College (formerly known as the Willow International Center) in northeastern Fresno (near the adjoining city of Clovis. Additional campuses in the district include the Madera Center (across the San Joaquin River, in the city of Madera) and the Oakhurst Center, in the town of Oakhurst (serving the Sierra foothill communities).

List of California State University, Fresno people

California State University, Fresno has numerous notable alumni, faculty, and presidents.

List of Chicago Bears players

The following are lists of past and current players of the Chicago Bears professional American football team.

List of Miami Dolphins players

The following is a list of American football players that have played for the Miami Dolphins.

List of people from Fresno, California

This is a list of people from Fresno, California.

Worrell

Worrell is a mainly English surname of:

People

Bernie Worrell (1944–2016), American keyboardist and composer

Cameron Worrell (born 1979), American football player

David Worrell (born 1978), Irish football player

Eric Worrell (1924–1987), Australian herpetologist

Ernest P. Worrell, fictional character by Jim Varney

Frank Worrell (1924–1967), West Indies cricketer and Jamaican senator after whom the Frank Worrell Trophy is named

Mark Worrell (born 1983), American baseball player

Peter Worrell (born 1977), Canadian ice hockey player

Tim Worrell (born 1967), American baseball player

Todd Worrell (born 1959), American baseball player

Trix Worrell (born 1960), English writer and director

Worrell Sterling (born 1965), English football playerOthers

Worrell 1000, a 1,000-mile beach catamaran race between South Beach, Florida and Virginia Beach, Virginia

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