Callirrhoe (Oceanid)

In Greek mythology, Callirrhoe or Callirhoe (Ancient Greek: Καλλιρρόη or Καλλιρόη, meaning "Beautiful Flow," often written Callirrhoë) was a naiad. She was the daughter of Oceanus and Tethys.[1] She was mentioned as a companion of Persephone when the daughter of Demeter was abducted by the lord of the dead, Hades.[2] Callirhoe had consorted with Chrysaor, Neilus and Poseidon. She was one of the three ancestors of the Tyrians, along with Abarbarea and Drosera.[3] Jupiter's moon Callirrhoe is named after her. She also mothered Cotys by Manes, king of Maeonia.[4]

Children

References

  1. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 351. English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Theogony. Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914.
  2. ^ Homeric Hymn 2, 417
  3. ^ Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 40. 535 ff
  4. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Roman Antiquities Book 1.27.1. Translated by Earnest Cary (1879-19??) and Edward Spelman (d. 1767), from the Loeb Classical Library edition of 1937
  5. ^ Hesiod, Theogony, 287, 981
  6. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 2. 5. 10
  7. ^ Stesichorus fragments 512-513, 587
  8. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, Preface & 151
  9. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 270-300. Though Herbert Jennings Rose says simply that it is "not clear which parents are meant", Athanassakis, p. 44, says that Phorcys and Ceto are the "more likely candidates for parents of this hideous creature who proceeded to give birth to a series of monsters and scourges". The problem arises from the ambiguous referent of the pronoun "she" in line 295 of the Theogony. While some have read this "she" as referring to Callirhoe (e.g. Smith "Echidna"; Morford, p. 162), according to Clay, p. 159 n. 32, "the modern scholarly consensus" reads Ceto, see for example Gantz, p. 22; Caldwell, pp. 7, 46 295–303; Grimal, "Echidna" p. 143.
  10. ^ Maurus Servius Honoratus. Commentary on the Aeneid of Virgil, 4.250. Edited by Georgius Thilo.
  11. ^ Tzetzes on Lycophron, 875
  12. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Roman Antiquities Book 1.27.1. Translated by Earnest Cary (1879-19??) and Edward Spelman (d. 1767), from the Loeb Classical Library edition of 1937
Callirhoe (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Callirrhoe or Callirhoe (; Ancient Greek: Καλλιρρόη meaning "beautiful flow") may refer to the following characters:

Callirrhoe (Oceanid), one of the Oceanid daughters of Oceanus and Tethys, and the mother of Geryon by Chrysaor.

Callirhoe, wife of Peiras, son of King Argus of Argos, son of Zeus and Niobe. She was the mother of Argus, Arestorides and Triopas.

Callirhoe, daughter of the river god Scamander, wife of Tros, and thus, mother of Ilus, Assaracus, Ganymede, Cleopatra and possibly, Cleomestra.

Callirhoe, daughter of Meander and consort of Car.

Callirhoe, daughter of Nestus, mother of Biston, Odomas and Edonus by Ares.

Callirhoe, a maiden who was loved by Coresus.

Callirrhoe, daughter of the river-god Achelous, who betrothed her to Alcmaeon.

Callirhoe, daughter of Lycus, king of Libya. She fell in love with Diomedes and saved him from being sacrificed to Ares by her father. After Diomedes left Libya, she hanged herself.

Callirhoe, daughter of the Boeotian Phocus.

Callirrhoe

Callirrhoe (, Ancient Greek: Καλλιρρόη; also Callirhoe) may refer to:

In Greek mythology:

Callirrhoe (Oceanid), one of the Oceanid daughters of Oceanus and Tethys, and the mother of Geryon.

Callirhoe, daughter of the river god Scamander, wife of Tros, mother of Ilus, Assaracus and Ganymede

Callirrhoe (daughter of Achelous), the daughter of the river-god Achelous, who betrothed her to Alcmaeon

Callirhoe, a maiden who was loved by Coresus

Callirhoe, daughter of Lycus, king of Lycia. She fell in love with Diomedes and saved him from being sacrificed to Ares by her father. After Diomedes left Lycia, she hanged herself.

Callirhoe, daughter of Nestus, mother of Biston, Odomas and Edonus by Ares

Callirhoe, daughter of the Boeotian Phocus

Callirhoe, daughter of Meander (mythology) and consort of Car

Callirrhoe (moon), a moon of Jupiter

Callirhoe (plant), a genus of plant within the Malvaceae family

Callirhoé, the only ballet written by French composer Cécile Chaminade

Chaereas and Callirhoe, a novel written by the ancient Greek author Chariton

Callirrhoe (Jordan), site of baths near Zareth-shahar on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.