California Department of Transportation

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is an executive department of the US state of California. The department is part of the cabinet-level California State Transportation Agency (CalSTA). Caltrans is headquartered in Sacramento.[4]

Caltrans manages the state's highway system, which includes the California Freeway and Expressway System, and is involved with public transportation systems throughout the state. It supports Amtrak California and Amtrak's Capitol Corridor.

In 2015, Caltrans released a new mission statement: "Provide a safe, sustainable, integrated and efficient transportation system to enhance California’s economy and livability."[5]

California Department of Transportation (Caltrans)
Caltrans
Agency overview
Formed1972
Preceding agencies
  • California Bureau of Highways
  • California Department of Highways
JurisdictionCalifornia State Government
Headquarters1120 N Street, Sacramento, California
38°34′28″N 121°29′37″W / 38.574564°N 121.493660°WCoordinates: 38°34′28″N 121°29′37″W / 38.574564°N 121.493660°W
Employees18,415 permanent staff
Annual budgetUS$17 billion (2016)
Agency executive
  • Laurie Berman, Director
Parent agencyCalifornia State Transportation Agency (CalSTA)
Key document
Footnotes
[1][2][3]

History

Sb dt state 001a
Caltrans District 8 Headquarters in San Bernardino
CalTrans headquarters
Caltrans headquarters in Sacramento

The earliest predecessor of Caltrans was the Bureau of Highways, which was created by the California Legislature and signed into law by Governor James Budd in 1895.[6] This agency consisted of three commissioners who were charged with analyzing the state road system and making recommendations. At the time, there was no state highway system, since roads were purely a local responsibility. California's roads consisted of crude dirt roads maintained by county governments, as well as some paved roads within city boundaries, and this ad hoc system was no longer adequate for the needs of the state's rapidly growing population. After the commissioners submitted their report to the governor on November 25, 1896, the legislature replaced the Bureau with the Department of Highways.[7]

Due to the state's weak fiscal condition and corrupt politics, little progress was made until 1907, when the legislature replaced the Department of Highways with the Department of Engineering, within which there was a Division of Highways.[6] California voters approved an US$18 million bond issue for the construction of a state highway system in 1910, and the first California Highway Commission was convened in 1911.[6] On August 7, 1912, the department broke ground on its first construction project, the section of El Camino Real between South San Francisco and Burlingame, which later became part of California State Route 82.[8] The year 1912 also saw the founding of the Transportation Laboratory and the creation of seven administrative divisions, which are the predecessors of the 12 district offices in use as of 2018.[6] The original seven division headquarters were located in:[9]

In 1913, the California State Legislature began requiring vehicle registration and allocated the resulting funds to support regular highway maintenance.[6]

In 1921, the state legislature turned the Department of Engineering into the Department of Public Works.[10]

The history of Caltrans and its predecessor agencies during the 20th century was marked by many firsts. It was one of the first agencies in the United States to paint centerlines on highways statewide; the first to build a freeway west of the Mississippi River; the first to build a four-level stack interchange; the first to develop and deploy non-reflective raised pavement markers, better known as Botts' dots; and one of the first to implement dedicated freeway-to-freeway connector ramps for high-occupancy vehicle lanes.

In late 1972, the legislature approved a reorganization, suggested by a study initiated by then-Governor Ronald Reagan, in which the Department of Public Works was merged with the Department of Aeronautics to become the modern California Department of Transportation.[11]

Administration

For administrative purposes, Caltrans divides the State of California into 12 districts, supervised by district offices. Most districts cover multiple counties; District 12 (Orange County) is the only district with one county. The largest districts by population are District 4 (San Francisco Bay Area) and District 7 (Los Angeles and Ventura counties). Like most state agencies, Caltrans maintains its headquarters in Sacramento, which is covered by District 3.

Districts

CalTrans District Map
Caltrans district map
District[12] Area (Counties) Headquarters
1 Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Mendocino Eureka
2 Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity; portions of Butte and Sierra Redding
3 Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo,Yuba Marysville
4 Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma, Oakland
5 Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz San Luis Obispo
6 Madera, Fresno, Tulare, Kings, Kern Fresno
7 Los Angeles, Ventura Los Angeles
8 Riverside, San Bernardino San Bernardino
9 Inyo, Mono Bishop
10 Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, Mariposa, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tuolumne Stockton
11 Imperial, San Diego San Diego
12 Orange Santa Ana[13]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Willits was the northernmost California Coast Range city connected to the national rail network when the headquarters were established there.
  2. ^ The Forsythe Building was shared with the original Gottschalks department store.

References

  1. ^ "Caltrans Executive Fact Book" (PDF). May 2016.
  2. ^ Taylor, Mac. "The 2016–17 Budget Transportation Proposals" (PDF). Legislative Analyst's Office. Legislative Analyst's Office of California. Retrieved 21 September 2016.
  3. ^ "State of California Department of Transportation February 2018 Organization Chart" (PDF). Caltrans. February 2018. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 February 2018. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  4. ^ "Caltrans Mail Addresses." California Department of Transportation. Retrieved on November 19, 2009.
  5. ^ "Caltrans Mission, Vision, Goals & Values". Caltrans. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d e Raymond Forsyth and Joseph Hagwood, One Hundred Years of Progress (Sacramento: California Transportation Foundation, 1996): 11
  7. ^ Raymond Forsyth and Joseph Hagwood, One Hundred Years of Progress (Sacramento: California Transportation Foundation, 1996): 12.
  8. ^ Raymond Forsyth and Joseph Hagwood, One Hundred Years of Progress (Sacramento: California Transportation Foundation, 1996): 13.
  9. ^ Ellis, W.R. (1913). "Division Engineers – Office Addresses". California Highway Bulletin. California Highway Commission. 1 (2): 2&3.
  10. ^ Raymond Forsyth and Joseph Hagwood, One Hundred Years of Progress (Sacramento: California Transportation Foundation, 1996): 32.
  11. ^ Raymond Forsyth and Joseph Hagwood, One Hundred Years of Progress (Sacramento: California Transportation Foundation, 1996): 128.
  12. ^ "Caltrans District Offices". California Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on 2010-02-11. Retrieved 2010-02-13.
  13. ^ "News Release D12 Move to Santa Ana October 2016 (PDF)" (PDF).

External links

Avenue of the Giants

The Avenue of the Giants is a scenic highway in Northern California, United States, running through Humboldt Redwoods State Park. It is a former alignment of U.S. Route 101, and continues to be maintained as a state highway as State Route 254 (SR 254).

California State Route 115

State Route 115 (SR 115) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California. It runs in Imperial County from Interstate 8 (I-8) southeast of Holtville to SR 111 in Calipatria. The routing was added to the state highway system in 1933, and was constructed by 1934; SR 115 was officially designated in the 1964 state highway renumbering.

California State Route 116

State Route 116 (SR 116) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California in Sonoma County. The route runs from State Route 1 on the Pacific coast near Jenner to State Route 121 south of Sonoma.

California State Route 118

State Route 118 (SR 118) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California that runs west to east through Ventura and Los Angeles counties. It travels from State Route 126 at the eastern edge of Ventura immediately northwest of Saticoy, then through Saticoy, in Ventura County east to Interstate 210 near Lake View Terrace in Los Angeles. SR 118 crosses the Santa Susana Pass and the northern rim of the San Fernando Valley along its route.

California State Route 127

State Route 127 (SR 127) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California that connects Interstate 15 in Baker to Nevada State Route 373 at the Nevada state line, passing near the eastern boundary of Death Valley National Park. The entire length of the highway closely follows the central portion of the former Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad and loosely follows the Amargosa River.

California State Route 140

State Route 140 (SR 140) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California, 102 miles (164 km) in length. It begins in the San Joaquin Valley at Interstate 5 near Gustine, and runs east into Sierra Nevada, terminating in Yosemite National Park.

California State Route 166

State Route 166 (SR 166) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California. It connects the Central Coast to the southern San Joaquin Valley, running from State Route 1 in Guadalupe and through Santa Maria in Santa Barbara County to State Route 99 in Mettler in Kern County.

California State Route 190

State Route 190 (SR 190) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California that is split into two parts by the Sierra Nevada. The western portion begins at Tipton at a junction with State Route 99 and heads east towards Porterville before ending at Quaking Aspen in the Sequoia National Forest. The eastern portion begins at US 395 at Olancha, heads east through Death Valley National Park, and ends at State Route 127 at Death Valley Junction. The 43.0-mile (69.2 km) portion over the Sierra Nevada remains unconstructed, and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) has no plans to build it through the wilderness areas. SR 190 is a National Scenic Byway known as the Death Valley Scenic Byway.

California State Route 24

State Route 24 (SR 24) is a heavily traveled east–west state highway in the U.S. state of California that serves the eastern side of the San Francisco Bay Area. A freeway throughout its entire length, it runs from the Interstate 580/Interstate 980 interchange (just east of the MacArthur Maze) in Oakland, and through the Caldecott Tunnel under the Berkeley Hills, to the Interstate 680 junction in Walnut Creek. It lies in Alameda County, where it is highly urban, and Contra Costa County, where it passes through wooded hillsides and suburbs. SR 24 is major connection between the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge/MacArthur Maze complex and the inland cities of the East Bay.

California State Route 243

State Route 243 (SR 243), or the Banning-Idyllwild Panoramic Highway, is a 30-mile (50 kilometer) two-lane state highway in the U.S. state of California that runs from Banning (in the north) to Idyllwild (in the south) in Riverside County. The highway is a connector between Interstate 10 (I-10) and SR 74. Along its route, it provides access to the San Bernardino National Forest. A road from Banning to Idyllwild was planned around the turn of the twentieth century, and was open by 1910. The road was added to the state highway system in 1970.

California State Route 27

State Route 27, commonly known by its street name Topanga Canyon Boulevard, is a state highway in the U.S. state of California that runs from Pacific Coast Highway (State Route 1) at Topanga State Beach near Pacific Palisades, through Topanga Canyon including the community of Fernwood Pacific also known as Topanga, and continuing through Woodland Hills, Canoga Park, West Hills, and Chatsworth to Ronald Reagan Freeway (State Route 118).

As one of the only routes across the Santa Monica Mountains, SR 27 is heavily traveled by commuters from the western San Fernando Valley heading to Santa Monica or Interstate 10.

California State Route 35

State Route 35 (SR 35), generally known as Skyline Boulevard for most of its length, is a mostly two-lane state highway in the U.S. state of California. It runs along the ridge of the Santa Cruz Mountains from the low point of State Route 17 near Lexington Reservoir in Santa Clara County to State Route 1 just south of Daly City in San Mateo County, where it crosses SR 1 and loops around Lake Merced to become Sloat Boulevard in San Francisco. SR 35 then continues along Sloat Boulevard until it reaches its terminus when it meets SR 1 again at 19th Avenue.

Because of its high elevation and location, it is one of the few places on the southern portion of the San Francisco Peninsula from which the San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean are both visible at the same time. It also provides scenic views of the Silicon Valley metropolitan area.

It was originally designated State Route 5 (SR 5), but this had to be changed with the creation of Interstate 5 (I-5) in 1964 to avoid confusion between the two roads.

California State Route 91

State Route 91 (SR 91) is a major east–west state highway in the U.S. state of California that serves several regions of the Greater Los Angeles urban area. A freeway throughout its entire length, it officially runs from Vermont Avenue in Gardena, just west of the junction with the Harbor Freeway (Interstate 110, I-110), east to Riverside at the junction with the Pomona (SR 60 west of SR 91) and Moreno Valley (SR 60 and I-215 east of SR 91) freeways.

Though signs along the portion from Vermont Avenue west to Pacific Coast Highway (SR 1) in Hermosa Beach along Artesia Boulevard are still signed as SR 91, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) no longer controls this portion of the highway, as this segment was relinquished to local jurisdictions in 2003.SR 91 inherited its route number from the mostly decommissioned U.S. Route 91 (US 91), which passed through the Inland Empire in a northeasterly direction on its way to Las Vegas, Salt Lake City, and points beyond. Those segments of US 91 are now parallel to, or have been replaced altogether by, I-15.

California State Route 94

State Route 94 (SR 94) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California that is 63.324 miles (101.910 km) long. The western portion, known as the Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway, begins at Interstate 5 (I-5) in Downtown San Diego and continues to the end of the freeway portion past SR 125 in Spring Valley. The non-freeway segment of SR 94 that continues east through the mountains to I-8 near Boulevard is known as Campo Road.

The Campo road served as a wagon road providing access to eastern San Diego County as well as Imperial County. The road was added to the state highway system in 1933, and signs for Route 94 were posted along local roads later that decade. Efforts to convert the western half of the route to a freeway got underway in the 1950s, and the freeway was complete by 1962 west of the road that became SR 125. Construction continued east to Avocado Road over the next few years. Various proposals for widening the highway have come from the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), but local opposition resulted in the delay or cancellation of many of these proposals.

Interstate 280 (California)

Interstate 280 (I-280) is a 57.5-mile-long (92.5 km) major north–south Interstate Highway in the San Francisco Bay Area of Northern California. It runs from I-680 and US 101 in San Jose to King and Fifth Streets in San Francisco, running just to the west of the larger cities of San Francisco Peninsula for most of its route.

From I-880 in San Jose to State Route 1 in Daly City, I-280 was built and dedicated as the Junipero Serra Freeway, after the Spanish Franciscan friar who founded the first nine of 21 Spanish missions in California from San Diego to San Francisco. One of the dedication signs (in Daly City) still indicates that the Junipero Serra Freeway is known as the "World's Most Beautiful Freeway" due to its scenic route through the San Francisco Peninsula. From State Route 1 to the James Lick Freeway (U.S. 101) in San Francisco it is officially called the John F Foran Freeway (after a former member of the California State Legislature). And from the James Lick Freeway to its northern end at King Street and Fifth Street, I-280 is called the Southern-Embarcadero Freeway.

I-280 is one of two 3-digit Interstate designations to appear on opposite coasts of the United States. I-110 in California and Florida is the only other designation.

I-280 is shown prominently on the app icon for Apple's iOS built-in Apple Maps app (previously the Google Maps app). This is because the highway goes through Cupertino, the home of Apple's headquarters.

List of Interstate Highways in California

This is a list of Interstates in the U.S. state of California that have existed since the 1964 renumbering. It includes routes that were defined by the California State Legislature but never built, as well as routes that have been entirely relinquished to local governments.

Each state highway in California is maintained by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and is assigned a Route (officially State Highway Route) number in the Streets and Highways Code (Sections 300-635). Under the code, the state assigns a unique Route X to each highway, and does not differentiate between state, US, or Interstate highways.

List of U.S. Routes in California

This is a list of U.S. Routes in the U.S. state of California. It includes routes that were defined by the California State Legislature but never built, as well as routes that have been entirely relinquished to local governments. It also includes the routes that were decommissioned during the 1964 state highway renumbering.

Each U.S. Route in California is maintained by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and is assigned a Route (officially State Highway Route) number in the Streets and Highways Code (Sections 300-635). Under the code, the state assigns a unique Route X to each highway, and does not differentiate between state, US, or Interstate highways.

Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways

California Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways (PATH) is a collaboration between the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), UC Berkeley, other public and private academic institutions, and private industry. PATH's mission: applying advanced technology to increase highway capacity and safety, and to reduce traffic congestion, air pollution, and energy consumption. The organization recently celebrated its twentieth year.

Caltrans provides a portion of PATH funding; the remaining funding comes from the United States Department of Transportation, other state and local agencies, and private industry. PATH supports the research of nearly 50 faculty members and 90 graduate students.

Alexander Skabardonis, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Berkeley, is the PATH Director.

As a collaborative organization, PATH has had many partners, including public agencies, universities, and private companies. Partners include the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans); the Federal Highway Administration; the Federal Transit Administration; the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; the Metropolitan Transportation Commission; the California Highway Patrol; the University of California, Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, and Riverside; Claremont Graduate University; University of Southern California; George Mason University; Virginia Tech; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Honda; Toyota; SRI International Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Honeywell; General Motors; DaimlerChrysler; and the Ford Motor Company. It is administered by the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Berkeley, and housed at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station.

Ryer Island

Ryer Island an island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in Solano County, California surrounded by Miner Slough and Steamboat Slough at their confluence with the Sacramento River, 6.5 miles north-northeast of Rio Vista. The 4,750 ha (11,700-acre) island is named in honor of a California pioneer, Dr. Washington M. Ryer, and his family. A map prepared at the time of statehood shows the area divided by the west fork of the Sacramento River, with the western half identified as Priest Island and the eastern half identified as Sutter Island.The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) operates two vehicle ferry services to the island, connecting the following state highways:

SR 84 south / Ryer Island Ferry, towards Rio Vista

SR 220 east / Howard Landing Ferry, towards RydeHighway 220 then terminates at Highway 84 on Ryer Island, while the latter leaves the island north on a bridge, and towards West Sacramento.

States
Other areas

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.