Calico (company)

Calico LLC is an American research and development biotech company founded on September 18, 2013 by Bill Maris[3][4][2][1] and backed by Google with the goal of combating aging and associated diseases.[5] In Google's 2013 Founders' Letter, Larry Page described Calico as a company focused on "health, well-being, and longevity". The company's name is an acronym for "California Life Company".[6][7]

In 2015, Google restructured into Alphabet Inc., making Calico a subsidiary of the new company along with Google and others. As of 2018, Calico has not developed any known drugs or biotechnology products.[8]

Calico LLC
Subsidiary
Industry
FoundedSeptember 18, 2013
FoundersBill Maris[1][2][3][4]
Headquarters,
United States
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Arthur D. Levinson (CEO)
ParentGoogle (2013–2015)
Alphabet Inc. (2015–present)
Websitecalicolabs.com

Partnerships and staff

In September 2014, it was announced that Calico, in partnership with AbbVie, would be opening up an R&D facility focused on aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration and cancer. Initially, each company will invest $350 million, with an option for each to add an extra $500 million later on.[9] In the same month, Calico announced a partnership with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and 2M Companies regarding drug development for neurodegenerative disorders.[10]

In 2015, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard announced a partnership with Calico to "advance research on age-related diseases and therapeutics",[11] a further partnership also was announced with the Buck Institute for Research on Aging.[12] Also in 2015, Calico announced a partnership with QB3 based on researching the biology of aging and identifying potential therapeutics for age-related diseases[13] and one with AncestryDNA based on conducting research into the genetics of human lifespan.[14]

At the end of 2017 and the beginning of 2018, Calico lost two top scientists; in December 2017 Hal Barron, its head of R&D, left for GlaxoSmithKline, and in March 2018 Daphne Koller, who was leading their AI efforts, left to pursue a venture in applying machine learning techniques to drug design.[15][16]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "The brains behind Calico? Bill Maris of Google Ventures". VentureBeat. Retrieved 16 February 2018.
  2. ^ a b Regalado, Antonio. "Can naked mole rats teach us the secrets to living longer?". Retrieved 16 February 2018.
  3. ^ a b Naughton, John (9 April 2017). "Why Silicon Valley wants to thwart the grim reaper". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 16 February 2018.
  4. ^ a b Fortuna, W. Harry. "Seeking eternal life, Silicon Valley is solving for death". Quartz. Retrieved 16 February 2018.
  5. ^ "Google announces Calico, a new company focused on health and well-being". 18 September 2013.
  6. ^ Pollack, Andrew; Miller, Claire Cain (18 September 2013). "Tech Titans Form Biotechnology Company". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  7. ^ Page, Larry. "2013 Founders' Letter".
  8. ^ Womack, Brian (10 August 2015). "Google Creates New Company Called Alphabet, Restructures Stock". Bloomberg. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  9. ^ "AbbVie and Calico Announce a Novel Collaboration to Accelerate the Discovery, Development, and Commercialization of New Therapies". 3 September 2014.
  10. ^ "UT Southwestern researchers discover novel class of NAMPT activators for neurodegenerative disease; Calico enters into exclusive collaboration with 2M to develop UTSW technology". 11 September 2014.
  11. ^ "Broad Institute and Calico announce an extensive collaboration focused on the biology of aging and therapeutic approaches to diseases of aging".
  12. ^ "Google's Calico continues its partnering romp on aging R&D with Buck collaboration".
  13. ^ "Calico and QB3 announce partnership to conduct research into the biology of aging and to identify potential therapeutics for age-related diseases". 24 March 2015. Retrieved 6 June 2015.
  14. ^ "AncestryDNA and Calico to Research the Genetics of Human Lifespan".
  15. ^ Al Idrus, Amirah (March 2, 2018). "Calico loses its second executive in 4 months as Daphne Koller quits". FierceBiotech.
  16. ^ https://medium.com/@daphne_38275/insitro-rethinking-drug-discovery-using-machine-learning-dcb0371870ee

External links

Arthur D. Levinson

Arthur D. Levinson (born March 31, 1950) is an American businessman and is the current Chairman of Apple Inc. (2011 to present) and CEO of Calico (an Alphabet Inc. venture). He is the former chief executive officer (1995 to 2009) and chairman (1999 to 2014) of Genentech.

In addition to serving on the board of Apple Inc. (2000–present), Levinson serves on the board of directors of the Broad Institute (affiliated with MIT and Harvard). Previously, Levinson had served on the board of directors at F. Hoffmann-La Roche (2010-2014), NGM Biopharmaceuticals (2009-2014), and Amyris Biotechnologies (2009-2014). He currently serves on the Board of Scientific Consultants of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Industrial Advisory Board of the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), the Advisory Council for the Princeton University Department of Molecular Biology and the Advisory Council for the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics.

Biological immortality

Biological immortality (sometimes referred to as bio-indefinite mortality) is a state in which the rate of mortality from senescence is stable or decreasing, thus decoupling it from chronological age. Various unicellular and multicellular species, including some vertebrates, achieve this state either throughout their existence or after living long enough. A biologically immortal living being can still die from means other than senescence, such as through injury or disease.

This definition of immortality has been challenged in the Handbook of the Biology of Aging, because the increase in rate of mortality as a function of chronological age may be negligible at extremely old ages, an idea referred to as the late-life mortality plateau. The rate of mortality may cease to increase in old age, but in most cases that rate is typically very high. As a hypothetical example, there is a 50% chance of a human surviving another year at age 110 or greater.

The term is also used by biologists to describe cells that are not subject to the Hayflick limit on how many times they can divide.

California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

The California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3) is a nonprofit research and technology commercialization institute spanning three University of California campuses in the San Francisco Bay Area: UC Berkeley, UCSF, and UC Santa Cruz. QB3's domain is the quantitative biosciences: areas of biology in which advances are chiefly made by scientists applying techniques from physics, chemistry, engineering, and computer science.

Hal V. Barron

Hal V. Barron (born 1962) is an American clinician-scientist and drug developer who will serve as president of research and development at GlaxoSmithKline from March 2018.. Prior to this he served as president of research and development at Calico. He has served as executive vice president, head of global product development, and chief medical officer of Hoffman-La Roche.

Laura Deming

Laura Deming is a venture capitalist. Her work focuses on life extension, and using biological research to reduce or reverse the effects of aging.

Longevity

The word "longevity" is sometimes used as a synonym for "life expectancy" in demography. However, the term longevity is sometimes meant to refer only to especially long-lived members of a population, whereas life expectancy is always defined statistically as the average number of years remaining at a given age. For example, a population's life expectancy at birth is the same as the average age at death for all people born in the same year (in the case of cohorts). Longevity is best thought of as a term for general audiences meaning 'typical length of life' and specific statistical definitions should be clarified when necessary.

Reflections on longevity have usually gone beyond acknowledging the brevity of human life and have included thinking about methods to extend life. Longevity has been a topic not only for the scientific community but also for writers of travel, science fiction, and utopian novels.

There are many difficulties in authenticating the longest human life span ever by modern verification standards, owing to inaccurate or incomplete birth statistics. Fiction, legend, and folklore have proposed or claimed life spans in the past or future vastly longer than those verified by modern standards, and longevity narratives and unverified longevity claims frequently speak of their existence in the present.

A life annuity is a form of longevity insurance.

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