Caldo gallego

Caldo galego or simply caldo (in Galician), also known as caldo gallego (in Spanish), meaning literally Galician broth, is a traditional soup dish from Galicia.[1] It is similar to caldo verde, popular in neighboring Portugal.

Ingredients include repolo (cabbage), verzas (collard greens), grelos, or navizas (sweet turnip greens); potatoes; white beans; and unto (lard). Additionally it can contain fatty pork, chorizo, ham, or bacon (compango).

It is served hot as a starter, often as part of xantar (lunch), and sometimes dinner. Traditionally it was usually served in cuncas (earthen bowls).

Caldo galego
Caldo gallego - juantiagues
Alternative namesCaldo; Galician broth
TypeSoup
Place of originGalicia (Spain)
Created byTraditional
Serving temperatureHot
Main ingredientsCabbage or other greens, potatoes, white beans, fatty pork

Variations

Depending on the availability of seasonal ingredients there are several variations:

  • Caldo branco includes chickpeas and beans.
  • Caldo chirlo or vigueiro
  • Caldo de castañas uses chestnuts

See also

References

  1. ^ "Caldo Gallego - Recipes". Cooks.com. Retrieved 2 October 2018.

External links

Cabbage soup

Cabbage soup may refer to any of the variety of soups based on various cabbages, or on sauerkraut and known under different names in national cuisines. Often it is a vegetable soup. It may be prepared with different ingredients. Vegetarian cabbage soup may use mushroom stock. Another variety is using a fish stock. Traditional cabbage soup is prepared using a pork stock.

Caldo verde

Caldo verde (pronounced [ˈkaɫdu ˈveɾðɨ], Portuguese for "green broth") is a popular soup in Portuguese cuisine.The basic traditional ingredients for caldo verde are potatoes, collard greens, olive oil and salt. Garlic and onion are traditionally added as well. Some recipes add meat, such as ham hock, making it similar to Italo-American wedding soup. The soup is usually accompanied by slices of paio, chouriço or linguiça (boiled separately with that water being discarded, the sausage added last minute to the soup), and with Portuguese broa cornbread for dipping. In Portugal, caldo verde is typically consumed during Portuguese celebrations, such as weddings, birthdays, and popular celebrations. For example, the St. John festival, in Braga or Porto. It is sometimes consumed before a main course meal or as a late supper.

Daisy Cooks!

Daisy Cooks! is a half-hour cooking show on PBS starring Daisy Martinez which features Spanish-Caribbean, Puerto Rican, and Mexican cuisine and their preparation.

Galician cuisine

Galician cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients found in the cuisine of the autonomous community of Galicia, Spain. These include shellfish, empanadas, polbo á feira (a dish made of octopus), the cheese queixo de tetilla, the ribeiro and albariño wines, and orujo liquor.

The potato is a staple food in the region, first arriving in Spain from the Americas in the 16th century, and then grown first and foremost on the coasts of the Ría de Noia. In Galician cuisine, neither the cook nor the recipe really matters; what is being served is the central part of the cuisine.

In Galicia, a wide variety of sea produce can be found in traditional dishes, due to the province's long shoreline and traditional fishing economy. Agriculture products such as potatoes, maize, and wheat are also staples in the Galician diet, along with dairy and meat products from cattle, sheep, and pigs; Galicia's grasses are green year-round and are excellent for grazing.

Due to the history of a weak economy, little industry, and overall a less-than-prominent position in Spanish politics and culture, the development of a Galician haute cuisine has been slowed until recently, with chefs such as Toñi Vicente gaining national attention only since the 1980s.

List of Spanish soups and stews

This is a list of Spanish soups and stews. Spanish cuisine is a way of preparing varied dishes, which is enriched by the culinary contributions of the various regions that make up the country. It is a cuisine influenced by the people who, throughout history, have conquered the territory of that country. Soup is a primarily liquid food, generally served warm (but may be cool or cold), that is made by combining ingredients such as meat and vegetables with stock, juice, water, or another liquid. Stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature (simmered, not boiled), allowing flavors to mingle.

List of foods named after places

Lists of foods named after places have been compiled by writers, sometimes on travel websites or food-oriented websites, as well as in books.

Since all of these names are words derived from place names, they are all toponyms. This article covers English language food toponyms which may have originated in English or other languages.

According to Delish.com, "[T]here's a rich history of naming foods after cities, towns, countries, and even the moon."The following foods and drinks were named after places. Each non-obvious etymology is supported by a reference on the linked Wikipedia page. Food names are listed by country of the origin of the word, not necessarily where the food originated or was thought to have originated.

List of soups

This is a list of notable soups. Soups have been made since ancient times.

Some soups are served with large chunks of meat or vegetables left in the liquid, while a broth is a flavored liquid usually derived from boiling a type of meat with bone, a spice mix, or a vegetable mix for a period of time in a stock. A common type of broth is consommé, which are crystal clear broths or stock that have a full flavor, aroma, and body.

A potage is a category of thick soups, stews, or porridges, in some of which meat and vegetables are boiled together with water until they form into a thick mush.

Bisques are heavy cream soups traditionally prepared with shellfish, but can be made with any type of seafood or other base ingredients. Cream soups are a dairy based soup. Although they may be consumed on their own, or with a meal, the canned, condensed form of cream soup is sometimes used as a quick sauce in a variety of meat and pasta convenience food dishes, such as casseroles. Similar to a bisque, chowders are thick soups usually containing some type of starch.

Coulis were originally meat juices, and now are thick purées.

Some soups are served only cold, and other soups can optionally be served cold.

List of stews

This is a list of notable stews. A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Ingredients in a stew can include any combination of vegetables (such as carrots, potatoes, beans, onions, peppers, tomatoes, etc.), plus meat, especially tougher meats suitable for slow-cooking, such as beef. Poultry, pork, lamb or mutton, sausages, and seafood are also used.

National dish

A national dish is a culinary dish that is strongly associated with a particular country. A dish can be considered a national dish for a variety of reasons:

It is a staple food, made from a selection of locally available foodstuffs that can be prepared in a distinctive way, such as fruits de mer, served along the west coast of France.

It contains a particular 'exotic' ingredient that is produced locally, such as the South American paprika grown in the European Pyrenees.

It is served as a festive culinary tradition that forms part of a cultural heritage—for example, barbecues at summer camp or fondue at dinner parties—or as part of a religious practice, such as Korban Pesach or Iftar celebrations.

It has been promoted as a national dish, by the country itself, such as the promotion of fondue as a national dish of Switzerland by the Swiss Cheese Union (Schweizerische Käseunion) in the 1930s.National dishes are part of a nation's identity and self-image. During the age of European empire-building, nations would develop a national cuisine to distinguish themselves from their rivals.According to Zilkia Janer, a lecturer on Latin American culture at Hofstra University, it is impossible to choose a single national dish, even unofficially, for countries such as Mexico, China or India because of their diverse ethnic populations and cultures. The cuisine of such countries simply cannot be represented by any single national dish. Furthermore, because national dishes are so interwoven into a nation's sense of identity, strong emotions and conflicts can arise when trying to choose a country's national dish.

Puerto Rican cuisine

Puerto Rican cuisine has its roots in the cooking traditions and practices of Europe (mostly Spain), Africa and the native Taínos. Starting from the latter part of the 19th century. Puerto Rican cuisine can be found in several other countries.

Spain

Spain (Spanish: España [esˈpaɲa] (listen)), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Spanish: Reino de España), is a country mostly located in Europe. Its continental European territory is situated on the Iberian Peninsula. Its territory also includes two archipelagoes: the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa, and the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean Sea. The African enclaves of Ceuta, Melilla, and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera make Spain the only European country to have a physical border with an African country (Morocco). Several small islands in the Alboran Sea are also part of Spanish territory. The country's mainland is bordered to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea except for a small land boundary with Gibraltar; to the north and northeast by France, Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay; and to the west and northwest by Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean.

With an area of 505,990 km2 (195,360 sq mi), Spain is the largest country in Southern Europe, the second largest country in Western Europe and the European Union, and the fourth largest country in the European continent. By population (about 47 million), Spain is the sixth largest in Europe and the fifth in the European Union. Spain's capital and largest city is Madrid; other major urban areas include Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Málaga and Bilbao.

Modern humans first arrived in the Iberian Peninsula around 35,000 years ago. Iberian cultures along with ancient Phoenician, Greek, Celtic and Carthaginian settlements developed on the peninsula until it came under Roman rule around 200 BCE, after which the region was named Hispania, based on the earlier Phoenician name Sp(a)n or Spania. At the end of the Western Roman Empire the Germanic tribal confederations migrated from Central Europe, invaded the Iberian peninsula and established relatively independent realms in its western provinces, including the Suebi, Alans and Vandals. Eventually, the Visigoths would forcibly integrate all remaining independent territories in the peninsula, including Byzantine provinces, into the Kingdom of Toledo, which more or less unified politically, ecclesiastically and legally all the former Roman provinces or successor kingdoms of what was then documented as Hispania.

In the early eighth century the Visigothic Kingdom fell to the Muslim of the Umayyad Islamic Caliphate, who arrived to rule most of the peninsula in the year 711, leaving only a handful of small Christian realms in the north and lasting up to eight centuries in the Kingdom of Granada. This led to many wars during a long reconquering period across the Iberian Peninsula, which led to the creation of Kingdom of Leon, Kingdom of Castille, Kingdom of Aragon and Kingdom of Navarre as the main Christian kingdoms to face the invasion. Following the establishment of Al-Andalus, Europeans began a gradual process of retaking the region known as the Reconquista, which by the late 15th century culminated in the emergence of Spain as a unified country under the Catholic Monarchs. The end of Muslim rule in Spain occurred in 1492, the same year Christopher Columbus arrived in the New World.

In the early modern period, Spain became the world's first global empire and the most powerful country in the world, leaving a large cultural and linguistic legacy that includes +570 million Hispanophones, making Spanish the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese. During the Golden Age there were also many advancements in the arts, with world-famous painters such as Diego Velázquez.

The most famous Spanish literary work, Don Quixote, was also published during the Golden Age. Spain hosts the world's third-largest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Spain is a secular parliamentary democracy and a parliamentary monarchy, with King Felipe VI as head of state. It is a major developed country and a high income country, with the world's fourteenth largest economy by nominal GDP and sixteenth largest by purchasing power parity. It is a member of the United Nations (UN), the European Union (EU), the Eurozone, the Council of Europe (CoE), the Organization of Ibero-American States (OEI), the Union for the Mediterranean, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), the Schengen Area, the World Trade Organization (WTO) and many other international organisations. While not an official member, Spain has a "Permanent Invitation" to the G20 summits, participating in every summit, which makes Spain a de facto member of the group.

Spanish settlement of Puerto Rico

Spanish settlement of Puerto Rico began in the early 1500s shortly after the formation of the Spanish state in 1493 (continuing until 1898 as a colony of Spain) and continues to the present day. On 25 September 1493, Christopher Columbus set sail on his second voyage with 17 ships and 1,200–1,500 men from Cádiz, Spain. On 19 November 1493 he landed on the island, naming it San Juan Bautista in honor of Saint John the Baptist.

There are two recognized Spanish immigration waves to Puerto Rico: the first arrived during the colonial period, and the second after the Spanish Civil War. There is a continuing but small number of Spanish-born residents on the island.

The Spanish heritage in Puerto Rico is palpable today in its customs and many traditions, language, and in the old and new architectural designs.

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