CONMEBOL

The South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL, /ˈkɒnmɪbɒl/; Spanish: Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol;[1] Portuguese: Confederação Sul-Americana de Futebol[2] or CSF) is the continental governing body of football in South America (apart from Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana), and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay, near Asunción. CONMEBOL is responsible for the organization and governance of South American football's major international tournaments. With 10 member football associations, it has the fewest members of all the confederations in FIFA.

CONMEBOL national teams have won nine FIFA World Cups (Brazil five, Uruguay two, and Argentina two), and CONMEBOL clubs have won 22 Intercontinental Cups and four FIFA Club World Cups. Argentina and Uruguay have won two Olympic gold medals each, and Brazil has won one Olympic gold medal. It is considered one of the strongest confederations in the world.

The World Cup qualifiers of CONMEBOL have been described as the "toughest qualifiers in the world" for their simple round-robin system, entry of some of the top national teams in the world, leveling of the weaker national teams, climate conditions, geographic conditions, strong home stands, and passionate supporters.[3][4] Currently, the Confederation is planning to create the first women's qualification to the FIFA Women's World Cup to replace the Copa América Femenina.

Juan Ángel Napout (Paraguay) was the president of CONMEBOL until 3 December 2015 when he was arrested in a raid in Switzerland as part of the U.S. Justice Department's bribery case involving FIFA. Wilmar Valdez (Uruguay) was interim president until 26 January 2016 when Alejandro Domínguez (Paraguay) was elected president. The Vice presidents are Ramón Jesurum (Colombia), Laureano González (Venezuela), and Arturo Salah (Chile).

South American Football Confederation
CONMEBOL logo (2017)
CONMEBOL member associations map
AbbreviationCONMEBOL
CSF
Formation9 July 1916
TypeSports organisation
HeadquartersLuque (Gran Asunción), Paraguay
Coordinates25°15′38″S 57°30′58″W / 25.26056°S 57.51611°W
Region served
South America
Membership
10 member associations
Official languages
Spanish, Portuguese
Alejandro Domínguez
Vice Presidents
Laureano González (1st)
Claudio Tapia (2nd)
Arturo Salah (3rd)
Treasurer
Rolando López
Parent organization
FIFA
Websitewww.conmebol.com

History

CONMEBOL logo (1989–2017)
The old logo (1989–2017) featured the flags of every member of the confederation

In 1916, the first edition of the "Campeonato Sudamericano de Fútbol" (South-American Football Championship), now known as the "Copa América", was contested in Argentina to commemorate the centenary of the Argentine Declaration of Independence. The four participating associations of that tournament gathered together in Buenos Aires in order to officially create a governing body to facilitate the organization of the tournament. Thus, CONMEBOL was founded on 9 July 1916 under the initiative of Uruguayan Héctor Rivadavia Gómez, but approved by the football associations of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay. The first Constitutional Congress on 15 December of that same year, which took place in Montevideo, ratified the decision.

Over the years, the other football associations in South America joined, with the last being Venezuela in 1952. Guyana, Suriname, and the French overseas department of French Guiana, while geographically in South America, are not part of CONMEBOL. Consisting of a French territory, a former British territory, and a former Dutch territory, they are part of the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF), mainly due to historical, cultural, and sporting reasons. With ten member nations, CONMEBOL is the smallest and the only fully continental land-based FIFA confederation (no insular countries or associates from different continents).

Members

CONMEBOL orthographic projection Mapa CONMEBOL
Countries that are members of CONMEBOL
Code Association Founded Joined National team Top division
ARG  Argentina 1893 1916 (M, W) Superliga Argentina
BOL  Bolivia 1925 1926 (M, W) División Profesional
BRA  Brazil 1914 1916 (M, W) Campeonato Brasileiro Série A
CHI  Chile 1895 1916 (M, W) Primera División
COL  Colombia 1924 1936 (M, W) Primera A
ECU  Ecuador 1925 1927 (M, W) Serie A
PAR  Paraguay 1906 1921 (M, W) División Profesional
PER  Peru 1922 1925 (M, W) Primera División
URU  Uruguay 1900 1916 (M, W) Primera División
VEN  Venezuela 1926 1952 (M, W) Primera División

Competitions

International

The main competition for men's national teams is the Copa América, started in 1916. CONMEBOL also runs national competitions at Under-20, Under-17 and Under-15 levels. For women's national teams, CONMEBOL operates the Copa América Femenina for senior national sides, as well as Under-20 and Under-17 championships.

In futsal, there is the Copa América de Futsal and Campeonato Sudamericano de Futsal Sub-20. The Campeonato Sudamericano Femenino de Futsal is the women's equivalent to the man's tournament.

Club

CONMEBOL also runs the two main club competitions in South America: the Copa Libertadores was first held in 1960 and the Copa Sudamericana was launched by CONMEBOL in 2002 as an indirect successor to the Supercopa Libertadores (begun in 1988). A third competition, the Copa CONMEBOL, started in 1992 and was abolished in 1999. In women's football, CONMEBOL also conducts the Copa Libertadores Femenina for club teams. The competition was first held in 2009.

The Recopa Sudamericana pits the past year's winners of the Copa Libertadores against the winners of the Copa Sudamericana (previously the winners of the Supercopa Libertadores) and came into being in 1989.

The Intercontinental Cup was jointly organised with UEFA between the Copa Libertadores and the UEFA Champions League winners.

Current title holders

Competition Champion Title Runner-up Next Edition
Clubs
Copa Libertadores Argentina River Plate 4th Argentina Boca Juniors 2019
Copa Libertadores Femenina Colombia Atlético Huila 1st Brazil Santos 2019
Copa Sudamericana Brazil Athletico Paranaense 1st Colombia Junior 2019
Recopa Sudamericana Argentina River Plate 3rd Brazil Athletico Paranaense 2020
Copa Libertadores de Futsal Brazil Carlos Barbosa 5th Paraguay Cerro Porteño 2020
Copa Libertadores Femenina de Futsal Brazil Unochapecó 2nd Paraguay Sport Colonial 2020
U-20 Copa Libertadores Uruguay Nacional 1st Ecuador Independiente del Valle 2020
Copa Libertadores de Beach Soccer Brazil Vitória 1st Brazil Vasco da Gama 2019
National teams (Men)
Copa América  Brazil 9th  Peru 2020
CONMEBOL Pre-Olympic Tournament Argentina Argentina 4th Paraguay Paraguay 2020
South American Under-20 Championship  Ecuador 1st  Argentina 2021
South American Under-17 Championship  Argentina 4th  Chile 2021
South American Under-15 Championship  Argentina 1st  Brazil 2019
Copa América de Futsal  Brazil 10th  Argentina 2019
FIFA Futsal World Cup qualifiers  Brazil 1st  Argentina 2020
South American Futsal League  Brazil 1st  Argentina 2020
South American Under-20 Futsal Championship  Brazil 7th  Argentina 2020
South American Under-17 Futsal Championship  Brazil 2nd  Argentina 2020
Copa América de Beach Soccer  Brazil 2nd  Paraguay 2020
FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup qualifiers  Brazil 6th  Paraguay 2019
South American Beach Soccer League  Brazil 2nd  Paraguay 2019
South American Under-20 Beach Soccer Championship  Brazil 1st  Argentina 2019
National teams (Women)
Copa América Femenina  Brazil 7th  Chile 2022
South American Under-20 Women's Football Championship Brazil Brazil 8th Paraguay Paraguay 2020
South American Under-17 Women's Football Championship Brazil Brazil 3rd Colombia Colombia 2020
Copa América Femenina de Futsal Brazil Brazil 5th Colombia Colombia 2019
South American Under-20 Women's Futsal Championship Brazil Brazil 2nd Colombia Colombia 2020

CONMEBOL competitions

Clubs:

Defunct

National teams:

Inter Continental:

Defunct

World Cup participation and results

Legend
  • 1st – Champion
  • 2nd – Runner-up
  •  3rd  – Third place[7]
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • QF – Quarterfinals
  • R16 – Round of 16 (since 1986: knockout round of 16)
  • R2 – Second round (for the 1974, 1978, and 1982 tournaments, which had two group stages)
  • GS – Group stage (in the 1950, 1974, 1978, and 1982 tournaments, which had two group stages, this refers to the first group stage)
  • 1S – First Knockout Stage (1934–1938 Single-elimination tournament)
  • Q – Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •    – Did not qualify
  •     – Did not enter / Withdrew / Banned
  •     – Hosts

Men's

Team Uruguay
1930
Italy
1934
France
1938
Brazil
1950
Switzerland
1954
Sweden
1958
Chile
1962
England
1966
Mexico
1970
West Germany
1974
Argentina
1978
Spain
1982
Mexico
1986
Italy
1990
United States
1994
France
1998
South Korea
Japan
2002
Germany
2006
South Africa
2010
Brazil
2014
Russia
2018
Qatar
2022
Total
 Argentina 2nd 1S GS GS QF R2 1st R2 1st 2nd R16 QF GS QF QF 2nd R16 17
 Bolivia GS GS GS 3
 Brazil GS 1S 3rd 2nd QF 1st 1st GS 1st 4th 3rd R2 QF R16 1st 2nd 1st QF QF 4th QF 21
 Chile GS GS 3rd GS GS GS R16 R16 R16 9
 Colombia GS R16 GS GS QF R16 6
 Ecuador GS R16 GS 3
 Paraguay GS GS GS R16 R16 R16 GS QF 8
 Peru GS QF R2 GS GS 5
 Uruguay 1st 1st 4th GS QF 4th GS R16 R16 GS 4th R16 QF 13
 Venezuela 0
Total 7 2 1 5 2 3 5 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 6 5 TBD 85

Women's

Team China
1991
Sweden
1995
United States
1999
United States
2003
China
2007
Germany
2011
Canada
2015
France
2019
Total
 Argentina GS GS GS 3
 Bolivia 0
 Brazil GS GS 3rd QF 2nd QF R16 R16 8
 Chile GS 1
 Colombia GS R16 2
 Ecuador GS 1
 Paraguay 0
 Peru 0
 Uruguay 0
 Venezuela 0
Total 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3

FIFA Confederations Cup

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • GS – Group stage
  • Q – Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  ••  – Qualified but withdrew
  •  •  – Did not qualify
  •  ×  – Did not enter / Withdrew from the Copa América or withdrew from the Confederations Cup / Banned
  •    – Hosts
Team 1992
Saudi Arabia
1995
Saudi Arabia
1997
Saudi Arabia
1999
Mexico
2001
South Korea
Japan
2003
France
2005
Germany
2009
South Africa
2013
Brazil
2017
Russia
Total
 Argentina 1st 2nd × 2nd 3
 Bolivia GS 1
 Brazil × 1st 2nd 4th GS 1st 1st 1st 7
 Chile 2nd 1
 Colombia 4th 1
 Uruguay 4th 4th 2
Total 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1

FIFA Futsal World Cup

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • QF – Quarterfinals
  • R2 – Round 2 (1989–2008, second group stage, top 8; 2012–present: knockout round of 16)
  • R1 — Round 1
  • Q — Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •    – Hosts
Nation 1989
Netherlands
1992
Hong Kong
1996
Spain
2000
Guatemala
2004
Chinese Taipei
2008
Brazil
2012
Thailand
2016
Colombia
2020
Lithuania
Years
 Argentina R2 R2 R1 R2 4th R2 QF 1st 8
 Brazil 1st 1st 1st 2nd 3rd 1st 1st R2 8
 Colombia 4th R2 2
 Paraguay R2 R1 R1 R2 R2 QF 6
 Uruguay R2 R1 R1 3
Nations 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4

FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • QF – Quarterfinals (1999–2001, 2004–present)
  • R1 – Round 1
  • q – Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  ••  – Qualified but withdrew
  •  •  – Did not qualify
  •     – Hosts
1995
Brazil
(8)
1996
Brazil
(8)
1997
Brazil
(8)
1998
Brazil
(10)
1999
Brazil
(12)
2000
Brazil
(12)
2001
Brazil
(12)
2002
Brazil
(8)
2003
Brazil
(8)
2004
Brazil
(12)
2005
Brazil
(12)
2006
Brazil
(12)
2007
Brazil
(16)
2008
France
(16)
2009
United Arab Emirates
(16)
2011
Italy
(16)
2013
French Polynesia
(16)
2015
Portugal
(16)
2017
The Bahamas
(16)
2019
Paraguay
(16)
Total Participations
 Argentina R1
7th
R1
8th
4th R1
8th
R1
10th
3rd R1
8th
QF
7th
QF
8th
QF
5th
R1
11th
QF
5th
R1
9th
R1
11th
QF
8th
R1
12th
16/20
 Brazil 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 4th 1st 1st 1st 3rd 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 3rd QF
5th
1st 20/20
 Chile R1
9th
1/20
 Ecuador R1
16th
1/20
 Paraguay R1
9th
R1
11th
QF
7th
Q 4/20
 Peru 4th 4th 2nd QF
7th
R1
9th
•, 5/20
 Uruguay R1
6th
2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd R1
9th
R1
11th
3rd R1
5th
QF
6th
QF
5th
2nd 3rd QF
7th
4th 15/20
 Venezuela QF
5th
R1
9th
R1
16th
3/20

Corruption

On 27 May 2015, several CONMEBOL leaders were arrested in Zürich, Switzerland by Swiss police and indicted by the U.S. Department of Justice on charges of corruption, money laundering, and racketeering.[8] Those swept up in the operation include former CONMEBOL presidents Eugenio Figueredo and Nicolás Léoz and several football federations presidents such as Carlos Chávez and Sergio Jadue. On 3 December 2015, the CONMEBOL President Juan Ángel Napout was also arrested.[9]

Leadership

Executive Committee

Name Nationality Position
Alejandro Dominguez  Paraguay President[10][11]
Ramón Jesurún  Colombia Vice President[12]
Laureano González  Venezuela 2nd Vice President
Arturo Salah  Chile 3rd Vice President
Jose Astigarraga  Paraguay General secretary[13]

Past presidents

Asunción - Edificio CSF
Headquarters of CONMEBOL in Luque, Paraguay

Rankings

National teams

Men's Top FIFA
ranked team

Men's national teams
FIFA Rankings
   Women's national teams
FIFA Rankings
Rank Nation Points Rank Nation Points
3  Brazil 1681 10  Brazil 1938
8  Uruguay 1615 26  Colombia 1703
11  Argentina 1582 34  Argentina 1664
13  Colombia 1580 38  Chile 1621
16  Chile 1561 48  Paraguay 1494
21  Peru 1516 58  Venezuela 1421
33  Venezuela 1485 63  Ecuador 1393
36  Paraguay 1468 65  Peru 1376
60  Ecuador 1375 75  Uruguay 1347
62  Bolivia 1365 92  Bolivia 1236

* Inactive for more than 18 months and therefore not ranked
Men's update: 14 June 2019[14]
Women's update: 12 July 2019[15]

Beach soccer national teams

Men's national teams
BSWW Rankings
Rank Nation Points
1  Brazil 3613
8  Paraguay 1467
18  Ecuador 710
23  Argentina 571
28  Chile 511
30  Uruguay 494
35  Peru 378
36  Venezuela 364
40  Colombia 276
44  Bolivia 228

Men's update: 23 September 2018[16]

Clubs

Football Database rankings

Rank Club Points
17 Brazil Palmeiras 1793
28 Argentina River Plate 1747
33 Argentina Boca Juniors 1731
37 Argentina Racing 1722
43 Brazil Flamengo 1705
44 Argentina Defensa y Justicia 1701
45 Brazil Grêmio 1695
46 Paraguay Olimpia 1688
74 Brazil Athletico Paranaense 1649
76 Brazil Internacional 1644

Last updated: 10 March 2019[17]

IFFHS

Zonal
Ranking
IFFHS
Ranking
Club Points
1 6 Brazil Palmeiras 264
2 7 Colombia Junior 262
3 8 Argentina River Plate 261
4 10 Colombia Santa Fe 237
5 11 Brazil Grêmio 234
6 13 Colombia Atlético Nacional 229
7 22 Argentina Boca Juniors 200
8 23 Brazil Cruzeiro 197
9 36 Uruguay Nacional 184
10 41 Brazil Athletico Paranaense 178

Last updated on: 12 March 2019 – [1]

See also

References

  1. ^ Spanish pronunciation: [komfeðeɾaˈsjon suðameɾiˈkana ðe ˈfuðβol].
  2. ^ Portuguese pronunciation: [kõfedeɾaˈsɐ̃w ˈsuw.ɐmeɾiˈkɐnɐ dʒi futʃʲˈbɔw].
  3. ^ "La eliminatoria más difícil del mundo". ESPN Desportes (in Spanish). 11 October 2011.
  4. ^ Vickery, Tim (18 October 2011). "South American WCQ toughest in world". ESPN.
  5. ^ http://www.conmebol.com/es/colombia-sera-sede-del-campeonato-sudamericano-preolimpico-sub-23-del-2020
  6. ^ Las competiciones oficiales de la CONMEBOL
  7. ^ There was no Third Place match in 1930; The United States and Yugoslavia lost in the semi-finals. FIFA recognizes the United States as the third-placed team and Yugoslavia as the fourth-placed team using the overall records of the teams in the 1930 FIFA World Cup.
  8. ^ "FIFA Officials Face Corruption Charges in US". 2015-05-27.
  9. ^ "Arrest of soccer bosses creates power vacuum at CONMEBOL". 2015-12-04.
  10. ^ "CONMEBOL". FIFA.
  11. ^ "The Executive Committee". CONMEBOL.
  12. ^ "CONMEBOL". FIFA.
  13. ^ "CONMEBOL". FIFA.
  14. ^ The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking – Men's Ranking, at FIFA
  15. ^ The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking – Women's Ranking, at FIFA
  16. ^ Overall World Ranking – CONMEBOL, at Beach Soccer Worldwide
  17. ^ "World Football / Soccer Clubs Ranking". FootballDatabase.

External links

2015 Copa América

The 2015 Copa América was the 44th edition of the Copa América, the main international football tournament for national teams in South America, and took place in Chile between 11 June and 4 July 2015. The competition was organized by CONMEBOL, South America's football governing body.

Twelve teams competed, the ten members of CONMEBOL and two guests from CONCACAF – Mexico and Jamaica, the latter of which competed in the Copa América for the first time. Uruguay were the defending champions, but were eliminated by the host nation Chile in the quarter-finals. Chile won their first title by defeating Argentina in the final on a penalty shootout after a goalless draw. As winners, they qualified for the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup in Russia.

2018 FIFA World Cup qualification (CONMEBOL)

The South American section of the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification acted as qualifiers for the 2018 FIFA World Cup held in Russia, for national teams which are members of the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL). A total of 4.5 slots (4 direct slots and 1 inter-confederation play-off slot) in the final tournament were available for CONMEBOL teams.

2019 Copa América

The 2019 Copa América was the 46th edition of the Copa América, the international men's association football championship organized by South America's football ruling body CONMEBOL. It was held in Brazil and took place between 14 June and 7 July 2019 at 6 venues across the country.

Heading into the tournament, Chile were the two-time defending champions, having won the 2015 and 2016 editions of the tournament, but were eliminated by Peru in the semi-finals leading to the third place match against Argentina, which they also lost.

Brazil won their ninth title by defeating Peru 3–1 in the final. Argentina took third place by beating Chile 2–1 in the third-place match.

2019 Copa Libertadores

The 2019 Copa CONMEBOL Libertadores is the 60th edition of the CONMEBOL Libertadores (also referred to as the Copa Libertadores), South America's premier club football tournament organized by CONMEBOL.The winners of the 2019 Copa Libertadores will qualify for the 2019 FIFA Club World Cup in Qatar, and earn the right to play against the winners of the 2019 Copa Sudamericana in the 2020 Recopa Sudamericana. They will also automatically qualify for the 2020 Copa Libertadores group stage.

In 2017, CONMEBOL proposed that the Copa Libertadores final to be played as a single match instead of over two legs. On 23 February 2018, CONMEBOL confirmed that starting from this edition, the final will be played as a single match at a venue chosen in advance, and on 11 June 2018 after its Council meeting in Moscow, the confederation confirmed that the final will be played on 23 November 2019. On 14 August 2018, CONMEBOL confirmed that the final will be played in Santiago, Chile at the Estadio Nacional.River Plate are the defending champions.

2020 Copa América

The 2020 Copa América will be the 47th edition of the Copa América, the international men's football championship organized by South America's football ruling body CONMEBOL. The tournament will take place in Colombia and Argentina from 12 June to 12 July 2020. This will mark the first time it will be hosted by more than one country since 1983, when it was played in a home-away basis, and the first time ever in two countries. Starting from this edition, the tournament will switch to be held every four years in even-numbered years, with the next edition taking place in 2024.

Brazil are the title holders, having won their ninth title in 2019.

Colombian Football Federation

The Colombian Football Federation (in Spanish: Federación Colombiana de Fútbol) is the governing body of football in Colombia. It was founded in 1924 and has been affiliated to FIFA since 1936. It is a member of CONMEBOL and is in charge of the Colombia national football team.

Copa América

CONMEBOL Copa América (CONMEBOL America Cup), known until 1975 as the South American Football Championship (Campeonato Sudamericano de Fútbol in Spanish and Copa Sul-Americana de Futebol in Portuguese), is a men's international football tournament contested among national teams from CONMEBOL. It is the oldest international continental football competition. The competition determines the continental champion of South America. Since the 1990s, teams from North America and Asia have also been invited to participate.

Since 1993, the tournament has generally featured 12 teams – all 10 CONMEBOL teams and two additional teams from other confederations. Mexico participated in every tournament between 1993 and 2016, with one additional team drawn from CONCACAF, except for 1999, when AFC team Japan filled out the 12-team roster, and 2019, which featured Japan and Qatar. The 2016 version of the event, Copa América Centenario, featured sixteen teams, with six teams from CONCACAF in addition to the 10 from CONMEBOL. Mexico's two runner-up finishes are the highest for a non-CONMEBOL side.

Eight of the ten CONMEBOL national teams have won the tournament at least once in its 46 stagings since the event's inauguration in 1916, with only Ecuador and Venezuela yet to win. Uruguay has the most championships in the tournament's history, with 15 cups, while the current champion, Brazil, has nine cups. Argentina, which hosted the inaugural edition in 1916, has hosted the tournament the most times (nine). The United States is the only non-CONMEBOL country to host, having hosted the event in 2016. On four occasions (in 1975, 1979, 1983 and 2020), the tournament was or will be held in multiple South American countries.

Copa América Centenario

The Copa América Centenario (Portuguese: Copa América Centenário, English: Centennial Cup America; literally Centennial America Cup) was an international men's association football tournament that was hosted in the United States in 2016. The competition was a celebration of the centenary of CONMEBOL and the Copa América, and was the first Copa América hosted outside South America.The tournament was a commemorative version of Copa América (not the 45th edition). It was held as part of an agreement between CONMEBOL (the South American football confederation) and CONCACAF (the football confederation for North and Central America and the Caribbean) as a special edition between the usual four-year cycle, and featured an expanded field of 16 teams (an increase from the usual 12), with all ten teams from CONMEBOL and six teams from CONCACAF. Despite the tournament being an official iteration of the Copa América, the winner would not receive an invitation to the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup due to the commemorative nature of the tournament, although eventual winners Chile had already qualified through their 2015 victory.

Chile became the fourth nation to win at least two consecutive titles in CONMEBOL tournaments, after Uruguay, Argentina and Brazil. Argentina, meanwhile, lost their third consecutive final in a major tournament, following losses to Germany at the 2014 World Cup and Chile at the 2015 Copa América. When taking into account Argentina's losses against Brazil (2004 Copa América, 2007 Copa América and 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup) and Denmark (1995 King Fahd Cup), this is Argentina's seventh lost final since their last triumph at the 1993 Copa América.

Copa CONMEBOL

The Copa CONMEBOL (English: CONMEBOL Cup) was an annual football cup competition organized by CONMEBOL between 1992 and 1999 for South American football clubs. During its time of existence, it was a very prestigious South American club football contest, similar to the UEFA Cup. Clubs qualified for the competition based on their performance in their national leagues and cup competitions. Teams that were not able to qualify for the Copa Libertadores played in this tournament. The tournament was played as a knockout cup. The tournament ended in 1999, following the expansion of Copa Libertadores to 32 teams. The Copa Mercosur and Copa Merconorte, which both started in 1998, replaced the Copa CONMEBOL, and the merger of those three cups transformed in the current Copa Sudamericana, being all of them the precursors of the cup.The last champion of the competition was Talleres, while Atlético Mineiro is the most successful club in the cup history, having won the tournament two times. The cup was won by seven different clubs but it was never won consecutively.

Copa Libertadores

The CONMEBOL Libertadores, named as Copa Libertadores de América (Portuguese: Copa Libertadores da América or Taça Libertadores da América), is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 1960. It is one of the most prestigious tournaments in the world and the most prestigious club competition in South American football. The tournament is named in honor of the Libertadores (Spanish and Portuguese for liberators), the main leaders of the South American wars of independence, so a literal translation of its name into English would be "America's Liberators Cup".

The competition has had several different formats over its lifetime. At the beginning, only the champions of the South American leagues participated. In 1966, the runners-up of the South American leagues began to join. In 1998, Mexican teams were invited to compete, and have contested regularly since 2000, when the tournament was expanded from 20 to 32 teams. Today at least four clubs per country compete in the tournament, while Argentina and Brazil have six and seven clubs participating, respectively. Traditionally, a group stage has always been used but the number of teams per group has varied several times.In the present format, the tournament consists of six stages, with the first stage taking place in early February. The six surviving teams from the first stage join 26 teams in the second stage, in which there are eight groups consisting of four teams each. The eight group winners and eight runners-up enter the final four stages, better known as the knockout stages, which ends with the finals anywhere between November and December. The winner of the Copa Libertadores becomes eligible to play in the FIFA Club World Cup and the Recopa Sudamericana.Independiente of Argentina is the most successful club in the cup's history, having won the tournament seven times. Argentine clubs have accumulated the most victories with 25 wins, while Brazil has the largest number of different winning teams, with a total of 10 clubs having won the title. The cup has been won by 24 different clubs, 13 of which have won the title more than once, and won consecutively by six clubs.

Copa Master de CONMEBOL

The Copa Masters CONMEBOL (English: CONMEBOL Masters Cup, Portuguese: Copa Master da Conmebol or Supercopa Conmebol) was a football club competition contested by the 4 past winners of the Copa CONMEBOL at the time. The cup is one of the many inter-South American club competitions that have been organised by CONMEBOL. It was played from February 8 to February 12, 1996, and it was contested in the city of Cuiabá with the participations of Atlético Mineiro, Botafogo, São Paulo, and Rosario Central. São Paulo won the competition after defeating Atlético Mineiro in the final 3-0.

Copa Sudamericana

The CONMEBOL Sudamericana, named as Copa Sudamericana (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkopa suðameɾiˈkana]; Portuguese: Copa Sul-Americana [ˈkɔpɐ ˈsuw ɐmeɾiˈkɐnɐ]) is an annual international club football competition organized by the CONMEBOL since 2002. It is the second-most prestigious club competition in South American football. CONCACAF clubs were invited between 2004 and 2008. The CONMEBOL Sudamericana began in 2002, replacing the separate competitions Copa Merconorte and Copa Mercosur (that before replaced Copa CONMEBOL) by a single competition. Since its introduction, the competition has been a pure elimination tournament with the number of rounds and teams varying from year to year.

The CONMEBOL Sudamericana is considered a merger of defunct tournaments such as the Copa CONMEBOL, Copa Mercosur and Copa Merconorte. The winner of the Copa Sudamericana becomes eligible to play in the Recopa Sudamericana. They gain entry onto the next edition of the Copa Libertadores, South America's premier club competition, and also contest the Suruga Bank Championship.

The reigning champion of the competition is Brazilian club Athletico Paranaense, who defeated Colombian club Junior in the most recent final.

Argentine clubs have accumulated the most victories with eight while containing the largest number of different winning teams, with a total of six clubs having won the title. The cup has been won by 15 different clubs. Argentine clubs Boca Juniors and Independiente are the most successful clubs in the cup's history, having won the tournament twice, with Boca Juniors being the only one to achieve it back-to-back, in 2004 and 2005.

Copa de Oro

The Copa de Oro (English: Gold Cup, Portuguese: Copa Ouro), or Copa de Oro Nicolás Leoz, was a football cup winners' cup competition contested on 3 occasions by the most recent winners of all Conmebol continental competitions. These included champions of the Copa Libertadores, Supercopa Sudamericana, Copa CONMEBOL, Supercopa Masters and Copa Masters CONMEBOL. The Recopa Sudamericana champions did not participate. The cup is one of the many continental club competitions that have been organised by CONMEBOL. The first competition was held in 1993 featuring the 4 major continental champions of the previous season whilst the second competition in 1995 two continental champions declined to play leaving only two participants to play. In the final edition in 1996, all the continental champions accepted the invite to play. Boca Juniors, Cruzeiro and Flamengo were the only winners of the tournament with one title each. Brazil became the most successful nation of the competition with two victories.

Football at the 2020 Summer Olympics

The association football tournament at the 2020 Summer Olympics will be held from 22 July to 8 August 2020 in Japan.

In addition to the Olympic host city of Tokyo, matches will also be played in Kashima, Saitama, Sapporo, Sendai, and Yokohama.Associations affiliated with FIFA may send teams to participate in the tournament. Men's teams are restricted to under-23 players (born on or after 1 January 1997) with a maximum of three overage players allowed, while there are no age restrictions on women's teams.Brazil are the men's defending champions. Germany are the women's defending champions, but failed to qualify.

List of top-division football clubs in CONMEBOL countries

The South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) is the administrative and controlling body for association football in most of South America. It consists of 10 member associations, each of which is responsible for governing football in their respective countries. It includes all countries and territories within South America, with the exceptions of Guyana, French Guiana, Suriname, which are part of CONCACAF, and the disputed British and Argentine territory of the Falkland Islands, which is not a member of any confederation. Each CONMEBOL member has its own football league system. Clubs playing in each top-level league compete for the title as the country's club champion. Clubs also compete in the league and national cup competitions (if applicable) for places in the following season's CONMEBOL club competitions, the Copa Libertadores and Copa Sudamericana. Due to promotion and relegation, the clubs playing in the top-level league are different every season.

For clubs playing at lower divisions, see the separate articles linked to in the relevant sections.

Recopa Sudamericana

The CONMEBOL Recopa Sudamericana (Portuguese: CONMEBOL Recopa Sul-Americana), known also as the Recopa Sudamericana or CONMEBOL Recopa, and simply as the Recopa (Spanish: [reˈkopa], Portuguese: [ʁɛˈkɔpɐ]; "Winners' Cup"), is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 1988. It is a match-up between the champions of the previous year's Copa Libertadores and the Copa Sudamericana, South America's premier club competitions.

The competition has had several formats over its lifetime. Initially, the champions of the Copa Libertadores and Supercopa Libertadores contested it. In 1998, the Supercopa Libertadores was discontinued and the Recopa went into a hiatus. The competition has been disputed with either a presently-used two-legged series or a single match-up at a neutral venue. Together with the aforementioned tournaments, a club has the chance to win the CONMEBOL Treble all in one year or season. However, if the Copa Libertadores and Copa Sudamericana are won by the same team, then according to the Copa Libertadores regulations Article 1.7, both competitions' runners-up will play one or two matches in order to decide the team which will play in the Recopa.

The most recent champion of the competition is Argentine club River Plate, after beating Paranaense in the 2019 edition. Argentine club Boca Juniors is the most successful club in the cup history, having won the tournament four times. Brazilian clubs have accumulated the most victories with nine wins while Brazil has the most different winning teams, with seven clubs having won the title. The cup has been won by 16 clubs and won consecutively by four clubs: Brazil's São Paulo, Ecuador's LDU Quito, Argentina's Boca Juniors and River Plate successfully defended the title in 1994, 2006, 2010 and 2016, respectively.

South American U-15 Championship

The South American U-15 Championship is a South American association football competition held every two years contested by male players under the age of 15 and is organized by CONMEBOL, the governing body for football in South America. The first edition was for under-16 age players.

Brazil is the most successful team with four titles.

South American U-17 Championship

The South American U-17 Championship (Spanish: Campeonato Sudamericano Sub-17) is a football competition held every two years for South American under-17 teams. The tournament was born in 1985 out of a need for a classification tournament for the newly created FIFA U-16 World Cup (now the FIFA U-17 World Cup). For the first three editions (1985, 1986, and 1988), the competition was limited to under-16 teams. Afterwards, the age limit was raised one year. The tournament is held every two years. Since the first edition, Brazil has been the dominant force of the tournament, winning a record twelve times.

South American Youth Football Championship

The South American Youth Football Championship, also known as U-20 South American Championship and Juventud de América (English: "America's Youth") is a South American association football tournament organized by the CONMEBOL (CONfederación SudaMEricana de FútBOL), for South American national teams of men under age of 20.

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