CODEN

CODEN – according to ASTM standard E250 – is a six character, alphanumeric bibliographic code, that provides concise, unique and unambiguous identification of the titles of periodicals and non-serial publications from all subject areas.

CODEN became particularly common in the scientific community as a citation system for periodicals cited in technical and chemistry-related publications and as a search tool in many bibliographic catalogues.

History

The CODEN, designed by Charles Bishop (of the Chronic Disease Research Institute at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, retired), was initially thought as a memory aid for the publications in his reference collection. Bishop took initial letters of words from periodical titles thereby using a code, which helped him arranging the collected publications. In 1953 he published his documentation system, originally designed as a four letter CODEN system; volume and page numbers have been added, in order to cite and locate exactly an article in a magazine.[1] Later, a variation was published 1957.[2]

After Bishop had assigned about 4,000 CODEN, the four letter CODEN system was further developed since 1961 by L.E. Kuentzel at the American Society for Testing of Material (ASTM). He also introduced the fifth character to CODEN.[3][4][5] In the beginning of the computer age the CODEN was thought as a machine-readable identification system for periodicals. In several updates since 1963, CODEN were registered and published in the CODEN for Periodical Titles by ASTM, counting to about 128,000 at the end of 1974.

Although it was soon recognized in 1966 that a five character CODEN would not be sufficient to provide all future periodical titles with CODEN, it was still defined as a five character code as given in ASTM standard E250 until 1972.[6] In 1976 the ASTM standard E250-76 defined a six-character CODEN.[7]

Beginning in the year 1975, the CODEN system was within the responsibility of the American Chemical Society.[8]

Today, the first four characters of the six-character CODEN for a periodical are taken from the initial letters of the words from its title, followed by a fifth letter—one of the first six letters (A–F) of the alphabet. The sixth and last character of the CODEN is an alphanumeric check character calculated from the preceding letters. CODEN always uses capital letters.

In contrast to a periodical CODEN, the first two characters of a CODEN assigned to a non-serial publication (e.g. conference proceedings) are digits. The third and fourth characters are letters. The fifth and sixth character corresponds to the serial CODEN, but differs in that the fifth character is taken from all letters of the alphabet.

In 1975 the International CODEN Service located at Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) became responsible for further development of the CODEN. The CODEN is automatically assigned to all publications referred on CAS. On request of publishers the International CODEN Service also assigns CODEN for non chemistry-related publications. For this reason CODEN may also be found in other data bases (e.g. RTECS, or BIOSIS), and are assigned also to serials or magazines, which are not referred in CAS.

Current sources

CODEN assigned until 1966 can be looked up at the two-volume CODEN for Periodical Titles issued by L.E. Kuentzel. CODEN assigned until 1974 were published by J.G. Blumenthal.[9][10][11][12] CODEN assigned until 1998 and their disintegration can be found at the International CODEN Directory (ISSN 0364-3670), which has been published since 1980 as a microfiches issue.

Finding a current CODEN is now best done with the online database of CASSI (Chemical Abstracts Service Source Index), covering all registered titles, CODEN, ISSN, ISBN, abbreviations for publications indexed by CAS since 1907, including serial and non-serial scientific and technical publications.

CASSI online is the replacement for CASSI as a printed serial issue (ISSN 0738-6222, CODEN CASSE2), or as the Collective Index (0001-0634, CODEN CASSI6). CASSI will no longer be published in print. Only the CD-ROM issue of CASSI (ISSN 1081-1990, CODEN CACDFE) will be published furthermore.

Examples

  • To the journal Nature the CODEN "NATUAS" is assigned.
  • To Technology Review the CODEN "TEREAU" is assigned.
  • The Proceedings of the International Conference on Food Factors, Chemistry and Cancer Prevention (ISBN 4-431-70196-6) uses the CODEN "66HYAL".
  • To Recent Advances in Natural Products Research, 3rd International Symposium on Recent Advances in Natural Products Research the CODEN "69ACLK" is assigned.
  • US patent applications use CODEN "USXXDP".
  • German patent applications use CODEN "GWXXBX".

See also

References

  1. ^ Bishop, Charles: "An integrated approach to the documentation problem". In: American Documentation (ISSN 0096-946X, CODEN AMDOA7), Vol. 4, p. 54–65 (1953).
  2. ^ Bishop, Charles: "Use of the CODEN system by the individual research scientist". In: American Documentation (ISSN 0096-946X, CODEN AMDOA7), Vol. 8, p. 221–226 (1957).
  3. ^ Kuentzel, L. E.: "Current status of the CODEN Project". In: Special Libraries (ISSN 0038-6723), Vol. 57, p. 404–406 (1966)
  4. ^ Kuentzel, L. E.: "CODEN for periodical titles, Vol. 1 ; Periodical titles by CODEN, non-periodical titles, deleted CODEN". In: ASTM data series publication, American Society for Testing and Materials (ISSN 0066-0531); Vol. 23 A (1966).
  5. ^ Kuentzel, L. E.: "CODEN for periodical titles, Vol. 2 ; Periodical titles by title". In: ASTM data series publication, American Society for Testing and Materials (ISSN 0066-0531); Vol. 23 A (1966).
  6. ^ ASTM Standard E 250-72: Standard recommended practice for use of CODEN for Periodical Title Abbreviations. Philadelphia. ASTM, 1972.
  7. ^ ASTM Standard E 250-76: Standard recommended practice for use of CODEN for Periodical Title Abbreviations. Philadelphia. ASTM, 1976.
  8. ^ Anon: "Chemical Abstract Service assumes ASTM CODEN assignment". In: Journal of Library Automation (ISSN 0022-2240), Vol. 8, p. 12 (1975).
  9. ^ Blumenthal, Jennifer G. (ed.): "CODEN for periodical titles, Part 1 ; Periodical titles arranged CODEN". In: ASTM data series publication, American Society for Testing and Materials (ISSN 0066-0531); Vol. 23 B (1970).
  10. ^ Blumenthal, Jennifer G. (ed.): "CODEN for periodical titles, Part 2 ; Periodical titles arranged alphabetically by title". In: ASTM data series publication, American Society for Testing and Materials (ISSN 0066-0531); Vol. 23 B (1970).
  11. ^ Blumenthal, Jennifer G. (ed.): "CODEN for periodical titles ; Suppl. 1". In: ASTM data series publication, American Society for Testing and Materials (ISSN 0066-0531); Vol. 23 B (1972).
  12. ^ Blumenthal, Jennifer G. (ed.): "CODEN for periodical titles ; Suppl. 2". In: ASTM data series publication, American Society for Testing and Materials (ISSN 0066-0531); Vol. 23 B (1974).
  • Hammer, Donald P.: "A review of the ASTM CODEN for Periodical Titles". Library Resources & Technical Services (ISSN 0024-2527), Vol. 12, p. 359–365 (1968).
  • Saxl, Lea: "Some thoughts about CODEN". In: Special Libraries (ISSN 0038-6723), Vol. 59, p. 279–280 (1968).
  • Pflueger, Magaret: "A vote for CODEN". In: Special Libraries (ISSN 0038-6723), Vol. 60, p. 173 (1969).
  • Groot, Elizabeth H.: "Unique identifiers for serials: an annotated, comprehensive bibliography". In: The Serials Librarian (ISSN 0361-526X, CODEN SELID4), Vol. 1 (no. 1), p. 51–75 (1976).
  • Groot, Elizabeth H.: "Unique identifiers for serials: 1977 update". In: The Serials Librarian (ISSN 0361-526X, CODEN SELID4), Vol. 2 (no. 3), p. 247–255 (1978).

External links

Anais da Associação Brasileira de Química

The Anais da Associação Brasileira de Química (ISSN 0365-0073, CODEN AABQAL) is a Brazilian scientific journal in chemistry. It was first published in 1942 under the title:

Anais da Associação Química do Brasil, vol. 1 (1942) to vol. 9 (1950), (ISSN 0365-0383, CODEN AAQBAH).With volume 10 (1951) the title changed to:

Anais da Associação Brasileira de Química, vol. 10 (1951) to vol. 52 (2003)?, (ISSN 0365-0073, CODEN AABQAL).The history of the Associação Brasileira de Química began in 1922 as Sociedade Brasileira de Química as an independent organ for druggists, biologists and chemists. This society published the Revista Brasileira de Chímica (Vol. 1 (1929) to Vol. 2, no. 7 (1931), ISSN 0370-3711, CODEN RBCRAJ), which became the Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Química in 1932.

In 1939 the Sociedade Brasileira de Química founded another association called Associação Química do Brasil, while the Sociedade Brasileira de Química itself ceased in 1951, and was incorporated into the then formed Associação Brasileira de Química. This corporate body published the Anais da Associação Brasileira de Química starting from vol. 10 (1951).

Chief Editor is Prof. Dr. Julio Zukerman-Schpector, at the Departamento de Química at Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar).

Anales de Física

Anales de Física was a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering research in all areas of physics published by the Royal Spanish Society of Physics (Real Sociedad Española de Física). It continued Anales de la Real Sociedad Española de Física y Química/Serie A, Física and its first independent title was:

Anales de Física, 1968 (vol 64) to 1980 (vol. 76; ISSN 0365-4818, CODEN: ANFIA6)From 1981 (vol. 77 (1981) to Vol. 87 (1992) the journal was split in two sections:

Anales de Física/Serie A, Fenómenos e Interacciones (ISSN 0211-6243, CODEN: AFAIDU),

Anales de Física/Serie B, Aplicaciones, Métodos e Instrumentos (ISSN 0211-6251, CODEN: AFBIDZ).Finally, the journal was renamed to

Anales de Física, 1992 (vol. 88) to 1998 (vol. 94; ISSN 1133-0376, CODEN: AFISEX)Publication ceased after issue no. 2, 1998, when the journal was merged with several other European journals in the European Physical Journal. The Royal Spanish Society of Physics is now publishing two other journals entitled Revista Española de Física and Revista Iberoamericana de Física.

Anales de Química

The Anales de Química was a peer-review scientific journal in the field of chemistry. The first issue was published in 1903 by the Real Sociedad Española de Física y Química (later the Real Sociedad Española de Química, the Spanish Royal Society of Chemistry). Its publication ended in 1998.

Brazilian Journal of Chemical Engineering

The Brazilian Journal of Chemical Engineering (abbreviated as Braz. J. Chem. Eng., ISSN 0104-6632, e-ISSN 1678-4383, CODEN BJCEFZ) publishes papers, reporting basic and applied research and innovation in the field of chemical engineering and related areas. It was first published by the Associação Brasileira de Engenharia Química, São Paulo, in 1983 as the Revista Brasileira de Engenharia, Caderno de Engenharia Química (ISSN 0102-2687, CODEN RRBEEN). With vol. 11 (1994), it continued as the Brazilian Journal of Chemical Engineering.

Fulltext of the journal is available via SciElo starting from vol. 14 (1997). It continues Revista Brasileira de Engenharia, Caderno de Engenharia Química from 1994 on.

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France

The Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France was a French peer-reviewed scientific journal on chemistry published by the Société Chimique de France. It was established in 1858 under the title Bulletin de la Société Chimique de Paris (ISSN 0991-6504), under which additional name it appeared until the end of series 3.

The journal was published in several series:

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France (ISSN 0037-8968), Vol. 1 (1858) – Vol. 6 (1863) (= 1. Ser.).

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France, N.S. (= 2. Ser., Vol. 1 (1864) – Vol. 50 (1888), (ISSN 0037-8968).

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France, 3. Ser., Vol. 1 (1889) – Vol. 36 (1906), (ISSN 0037-8968).

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France, 4. Ser., Vol. 1 (1907) – Vol. 54 (1933).The fourth series of this journal was published as:

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France, 4. Ser, Analyse des travaux étrangers, Vol. 1 (1907) - Vol. 28 (1920), (ISSN 0150-9888).

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France, 4. Ser., Analyse des travaux francais et étrangers, Vol. 29 (1921) - Vol. 54 (1933), (ISSN 0370-8985).With the beginning of the fifth series, the journal was renamed as:

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France, Memoires, (= 5. Sér.), Vol. 1 (1934) – Vol. 12 (1945), (ISSN 0366-3132, CODEN BSCDAM),

Bulletin de la Société chimique de France, Documentation, Vol. 1 (1933) - Vol. 12 (1946), (ISSN 0366-3116), CODEN BSCDAM).After World War II, the fifth series of this journal was published as:

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France, Vol. 13 (1946) – Vol. 134 (1997), (ISSN 0037-8968, CODEN BSCFAS).The title was split in two parts from 1973–1984:

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France : Partie 1, Chimie analytique, chimie minérale, physicochimie (ISSN 0037-8968)

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France : Partie 2, Chimie moléculaire, organique et biologique (ISSN 0037-8968)In 1985 the two parts were merged again in 1997 as:

Bulletin de la Société Chimique de France (ISSN 0037-8968).In 1998 the journal was absorbed by the European Journal of Organic Chemistry and the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry.

Catuaba

The name Catuaba (pronounced [ka.two.'aba], a Guarani word that means "what gives strength to the Indian") is used for the infusions of the bark of a number of trees native to Brazil. The most widely used barks are derived from the trees Trichilia catigua and Erythroxylum vaccinifolium. Other catuaba preparations use the bark of trees from the following genera or families: Anemopaegma, Ilex, Micropholis, Phyllanthus, Secondatia, Tetragastris and species from the Myrtaceae.

It is often claimed that catuaba is derived from the tree Erythroxylum catuaba, but this tree has been described only once, in 1904, and it is not known today to what tree this name referred. E. catuaba is therefore not a recognised species (Kletter et al.; 2004).

Local synonyms are Chuchuhuasha, Tatuaba, Pau de Reposta, Piratancara and Caramuru. A commercial liquid preparation, Catuama, contains multiple ingredients, one of these being catuaba from Trichilia catigua.

An infusion of the bark is used in traditional Brazilian medicine as an aphrodisiac and central nervous system stimulant. These claims have not been confirmed in scientific studies. In catuaba is found a group of three alkaloids dubbed catuabine A, B and C.A study by Manabe et al. (1992) showed that catuaba extracts from Catuaba casca (Erythroxylum catuaba Arr. Cam.) were useful in preventing potentially lethal bacterial infections and HIV infection in mice.

Chemische Berichte

Chemische Berichte (usually abbreviated as Ber. or Chem. Ber.) was a German-language scientific journal of all disciplines of chemistry founded in 1868. It was one of the oldest scientific journals in chemistry, until it merged with Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas to form Chemische Berichte/Recueil in 1997. Chemische Berichte/Recueil was then merged with other European journals in 1998 to form European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry.

Coden, Alabama

Coden is an unincorporated community coastal fishing village in southern Mobile County, Alabama, United States. Located near Bayou la Batre, it lies across the Mississippi Sound from Dauphin Island.

European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

The European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal covering medicinal chemistry and published by Elsevier. It was established in 1966 as Chimica Therapeutica (CODEN: CHTPBA) and obtained its current title in 1974. From 1974 to 1981 the journal was still subtitled as Chimica Therapeutica and from 1982 to 1986 the subtitle was Chimie Therapeutique, indicating its French origin. And now it is the journal of the French Société de Chimie Thérapeutique.

The journal covers research on all aspects of medicinal chemistry and publishes original papers, laboratory notes, short or preliminary communications, and invited reviews.

The European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry is abstracted and indexed in the Index medicus and MEDLINE since 2000.

Fowl River

Fowl River is a 14.4-mile-long (23.2 km) brackish river in Mobile County, Alabama. It originates near the Mobile suburb of Theodore and then splits into the East Fowl River and the West Fowl River. The East Fowl River discharges into Mobile Bay south of Belle Fontaine. The West Fowl River discharges into the Mississippi Sound east of Coden. It was named by the original French colonists as the Riviere aux Poules, which can be translated into English as Fowl River.The famed Irish pirate Paddy Scott would regularly enter and leave the river.

Francille Rusan Coden

Francille Rusan Coden is a historian, best known for her research on Black Labor, Social Movements and Black Women's History.

George Leatherbury House

The George Leatherbury House was a historic house along the shore of Portersville Bay, halfway between Bayou La Batre and Bayou Coden, in southern Mobile County, Alabama.

International Journal of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

The International Journal of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy was a peer-reviewed scientific journal of psychiatry and psychotherapy published by the International Journal Press and Jason Aronson from 1974 until 1985.It was formed by the merger of the International Journal of Psychiatry published by the International Science Press from 1965 until 1973, and the International Journal of Child Psychotherapy (ISSN 0090-6891, CODEN IJPSDD, OCLC 01645841) published by the International Journal Press from 1972 until 1973.

At some point or another during their respective existences, all three titles were included in the Science Citation Index and PubMed/MEDLINE.

Liebigs Annalen

Justus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie (often cited as just Liebigs Annalen) was one of the oldest and historically most important journals in the field of organic chemistry worldwide. It was established in 1832 and edited by Justus von Liebig with Friedrich Wöhler until Liebig's death in 1873.

In 1997 the journal merged with Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas to form Liebigs Annalen/Recueil. In 1998 it was absorbed by European Journal of Organic Chemistry by merger of a number of other leading national European chemistry journals.

Nova Coden

The Nova Coden is a Polish autogyro under development by Nova Sp. z.o.o. of Gdynia. Intended to be type certified, it is planned that the aircraft will be supplied complete and ready-to-fly.

Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas

The Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas was the Dutch scientific journal for chemistry. It was established in 1882, but from 1897 (vol. 16) to 1919 (vol 38) it was published under the title Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique (ISSN 0370-7539, CODEN: RTCPB4). From 1980 (vol. 99) to 1984 (vol. 103), the journal was published under the title Recueil: Journal of the Royal Netherlands Chemical Society (ISSN 0165-0513, CODEN: RJRSDK), but in 1985 (vol. 104), the title changed back to the original one. In 1997, the journal merged with Chemische Berichte and Liebigs Annalen to form Chemische Berichte/Recueil and Liebigs Annalen/Recueil, respectively.

In 1998 this journal was absorbed by the European Journal of Organic Chemistry and the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry.

Rosocyanine

Rosocyanine and rubrocurcumin are two red colored materials, which are formed by the reaction between curcumin and borates.

Spanish Royal Society of Chemistry

The Spanish Royal Society of Chemistry (RSEQ) is a Spanish scientific society dedicated to the development and dissemination of chemistry, in its aspect of pure science and in its applications. It originated in 1980 after the split of the Spanish Royal Society of Physics and Chemistry which itself was founded in 1903.The purpose of the RSEQ is "to facilitate the advancement and improvement of scientific activity, teaching, research and professional in the field of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering."The RSEQ is a member of EuCheMS (European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences), a non-profit organization founded in 1970 that promotes cooperation between scientific societies and European techniques in the field of chemistry.

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