CBS Morning News

CBS Morning News is an American early morning television news program for CBS News that is broadcast on CBS. The program features late-breaking news stories, national weather forecasts and sports highlights. Since 2013, it has been anchored by Anne Marie Green, who concurrently anchored the CBS late-night news program Up to the Minute until its cancellation in September 2015.

The program is broadcast live at 4:00 a.m. Eastern Time (airing in the early timeslot to accommodate CBS stations that start their local morning newscasts at 4:30 a.m.), and is transmitted in a continuous half-hour tape delayed loop until 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time, when CBS This Morning begins in the Pacific Time Zone. The program usually airs as a lead-in to local morning newscasts on most CBS stations, although in the few markets where a morning newscast is not produced by the CBS station, it may air in a two- to three-hour loop immediately before the start of This Morning. The show is updated for any breaking news occurring before 7:00 a.m. Eastern Time, while stations throughout the network will join CBS This Morning in all time zones past that time at their local discretion or network orders for live coverage.

CBS Morning News
Morning News 2015
Titlecard from April 27, 2017
Also known asCBS Early Morning News
GenreEarly-morning news program
Presented byAnne Marie Green
(for past anchors, see section)
Theme music composerRick Patterson, Ron Walz
& Neal Fox (1991–2006)
James Horner (2006–2011)
James Trivers, Elizabeth Myers
& Alan James Pasqua (2011–present)
Joel Beckerman (2012–)
Opening theme"CBS News Theme," by Trivers-Myers Music (2011–2015)
"CBS This Morning Theme" (2015–present)
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
Production
Executive producer(s)Turaya Bryant Kamau
Production location(s)Studio 57
CBS Broadcast Center, New York City, New York
Camera setupMulti-camera
Running timeapprox. 23 minutes
Release
Original networkCBS
Picture format480i (SDTV),
1080i (HDTV)
Original release1963–1979
(as morning news program) –
October 4, 1982 – present
(current format)
Chronology
Related showsCBS Evening News
CBS Overnight News
CBS This Morning

History

Background

The CBS Morning News title was originally used as the name of a conventional morning news program that served as a predecessor to the network's current morning program, CBS This Morning. For most of the 1960s and 1970s, the program aired as a 60-minute hard news broadcast at 7:00 a.m., preceding Captain Kangaroo and airing opposite NBC's Today. Walter Cronkite and sportscaster Jim McKay both anchored the original CBS Morning News at one time. When CBS reformatted the early morning broadcast, the CBS Morning News became a pre-dawn 30-minute news broadcast.

CBS Early Morning News/current Morning News format

The program first aired in its current format on October 4, 1982 as the CBS Early Morning News, originally co-anchored by Bill Kurtis and Diane Sawyer. Sawyer departed both programs in mid-1984, to be named a correspondent for 60 Minutes later that year. In her absence, Kurtis was joined by a rotating series of co-hosts, principally Maria Shriver, Meredith Vieira and Jane Wallace.

For the first half of 1985, Kurtis would continue to anchor the Early Morning News solo until March while continuing to co-anchor the Morning News with Phyllis George until July. Faith Daniels took over and would remain on the anchor desk, most of the time sharing the role with Forrest Sawyer (July to December 1985 and January to September 1987) and later Douglas Edwards and Charles Osgood, until Daniels left CBS to become anchor of competing early-morning newscast NBC News at Sunrise in 1990. Osgood would remain anchor of the CBS Morning News until June 1992, paired with Victoria Corderi from 1990 to 1991, Giselle Fernández through February 1992, and then with Meredith Vieira for the remainder of Osgood's run as co-anchor. After Osgood left the program in 1992, the anchor turnover continued, a situation that has continued to this day.

The program continued to maintain a two-anchor format until Thalia Assuras was appointed as anchor of the CBS Morning News in 1998, at which point the program switched to a single-anchor format, which it has had ever since. In March 2009, when Michelle Gielan was named anchor of Up to the Minute, the CBS Morning News became integrated with the overnight news program, using the same anchors on both programs.

In November 2010, CBS Morning News became the third and final early morning news program to begin broadcasting in high definition; its counterpart, Up to the Minute, continued to be broadcast in standard definition until November 2012, when the program converted to high definition. In November 2012, production of the CBS Morning News and Up to the Minute relocated in the CBS Broadcast Center. The CBS Morning News moved to the studio of the CBS Evening News, and Up to the Minute was moved to the Studio 57 facility, the same studio where CBS This Morning is also broadcast, until its cancellation on September 18, 2015.

On September 21, 2015, the CBS Morning News debuted a new look, including a new logo and updated on-air graphics that are similar to those from the network's morning news program CBS This Morning. In addition, production of the program moved to the newsroom of CBS This Morning, where broadcasts of CBSN are also produced. Its long-running counterpart, Up to the Minute, was replaced the same day by the CBS Overnight News.

On-air staff

Current

Former

See also

  • The Early Show – Defunct morning news/talk program, which aired on CBS from 1999 to 2012.
  • Early Today - Competing early-morning news program on NBC, which debuted in 1999.
  • America This Morning – Competing early-morning news program on ABC, which debuted in 1982.

References

  1. ^ "Troy Roberts". CBS News.
1983–84 United States network television schedule (daytime)

These are the daytime Monday–Friday schedules on all three networks for each calendar season beginning in September 1983. All times are Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

New series are highlighted in bold.

1987–88 United States network television schedule (daytime)

These are the daytime Monday–Friday schedules on all three networks for each calendar season beginning in September 1987. All times are Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

New series are highlighted in bold.

1988–89 United States network television schedule (daytime)

These are the daytime Monday–Friday schedules on all three networks for each calendar season beginning in September 1988. All times are Eastern; local schedules may differ.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, local programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New series are highlighted in bold.

1989–90 United States network television schedule (daytime)

These are the daytime Monday–Friday schedules on all three networks for each calendar season beginning in September 1989. All times are Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, local programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New series are highlighted in bold.

1990–91 United States network television schedule (daytime)

These are the daytime Monday–Friday schedules on all three networks for each calendar season beginning in September 1990. All times are Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, Local/Syndicated programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New series are highlighted in bold.

1991–92 United States network television schedule (daytime)

These are the daytime Monday–Friday schedules on all four networks for each calendar season. All times are Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ. This would mark FOX's first attempt at the Daytime schedule genre, asking FOX affiliates to run Peter Pan & the Pirates in the morning and airing Beetlejuice in the afternoon as part of their Fox Kids brand.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, local programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New series are highlighted in bold.

1993–94 United States network television schedule (daytime)

These are the Daytime Monday–Friday schedules for each calendar season beginning September 1993. All Times are in Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, Local/Syndicated programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New Shows are shown in Bold Letters.

2003–04 United States network television schedule (daytime)

All the 4 Commercial Networks airs the Daytime Monday–Friday Schedules for each calendar season beginning in September 2003. All Times are in Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, local programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New series are highlighted in bold.

2004–05 United States network television schedule (daytime)

All the 4 Commercial Networks airs the Daytime Monday–Friday Schedules for each calendar season beginning in September 2004. All Times are in Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, local programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New series are highlighted in bold.

2005–06 United States network television schedule (daytime)

All the 4 Commercial Networks airs the Daytime Monday–Friday Schedules for each calendar season beginning in September 2005. All Times are in Eastern; affiliate schedules may differ.

Talk shows are highlighted in yellow, local programming is white, reruns of prime-time programming are orange, game shows are pink, soap operas are chartreuse, news programs are gold and all others are light blue. New series are highlighted in bold.

AM America

AM America was a morning news program produced by ABC in an attempt to compete with the highly-rated Today on NBC. Premiering on January 6, 1975, the show never found an audience against Today or the CBS combo of the CBS Morning News and Captain Kangaroo. Lasting just under ten months, its final installment aired on October 31.

America This Morning

America This Morning is an American early morning television news program that is broadcast on ABC. As of 2019, the newscast is anchored by Kenneth Moton and Janai Norman, who also serve as anchors of ABC's overnight news program World News Now. It is one of the two early morning news programs that use a two-anchor format, alongside NBC's Early Today (the CBS Morning News maintains a solo anchor). Usually airing following World News Now, it features national and international news headlines, live reports from Washington, D.C., national weather and airport impact forecasts, a short SportsCenter update from the late night Los Angeles-based anchors of the ESPN show to account for West Coast scores, and a regular business news segment called "America's Money".

The program is broadcast live at 3:30 a.m. Eastern Time following World News Now (airing in the early timeslot to accommodate ABC stations that start their local morning newscasts at 4:00 a.m.). ABC-owned WPVI-TV was one of the first stations to air local news starting at 4:00 a.m. beginning in September 2018. It is transmitted in a continuous half-hour tape delayed loop until 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time, when Good Morning America begins in the Pacific Time Zone (after 7:00 a.m. Eastern Time, any live breaking news requiring network-level coverage is under the purview of GMA with some allowance to start earlier). The program usually airs as a lead-in to local morning newscasts on most ABC stations, although in the few markets where a morning newscast is not produced by the ABC station, it may air in a two- to three-hour loop immediately before the start of GMA.

Anne-Marie Green

Anne-Marie Green (born September 21, 1971) is a news anchor for CBS on American television, based in New York City.

A Toronto native, Green earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Toronto and has a graduate degree in journalism from Humber College.

Green began her career as a reporter for CKVR-TV in Barrie and at Rogers Cable News in Mississauga, both located in Ontario. She was a news anchor in Toronto beginning in June 2001 with CITY-TV and also anchored at CablePulse 24, a 24-hour cable news channel servicing the greater Toronto area.Green joined KYW-TV (CBS 3) in October 2004 as a general assignment reporter and also a co-anchor for Sunday morning newscasts alongside Ben Simoneau. In October 2012, she became a substitute anchor for CBS News Up to the Minute. She was subsequently named the anchor for the CBS News early morning news broadcast CBS Morning News in New York City, effective January 21, 2013.She is married to Christian Hip-Hop Recording Artist Art Mikveh.

Bill Kurtis

Bill Kurtis (born William Horton Kuretich; September 21, 1940) is an American television journalist, producer, narrator, and news anchor. He was also the host of a number of A&E crime and news documentary shows, including Investigative Reports, American Justice, and Cold Case Files. Previously, he anchored The CBS Morning News, and was the longtime anchor at WBBM-TV, the CBS-owned and -operated TV station in Chicago. Kurtis is currently the scorekeeper/announcer for National Public Radio (NPR)'s news comedy/quiz show Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!, as well as serving as the host of Through the Decades, a documentary-style news magazine seen on CBS/Weigel Broadcasting's digital multicast network, Decades syndicated subchannel.

CBS Overnight News

CBS Overnight News is an American overnight television news program that is broadcast on CBS during the early morning hours each Monday through Friday. The program maintains a hard news format, incorporating national, international and business news headlines; feature reports; interviews; national weather forecasts; sports highlights; and commentary. CBS has carried an overnight news block since 1982; it was known as CBS News Nightwatch until 1992 and then Up to the Minute until September 18, 2015.

CBS Overnight News draws from the full resources of CBS News, including the CBS Evening News, CBS This Morning, Newspath, owned-and-operated stations and affiliates of the television network and APTN. It also featured rebroadcasts of selected stories from CBS News Sunday Morning, 48 Hours, 60 Minutes and Face the Nation.

Phyllis George

Phyllis Ann George (born June 25, 1949), Miss America 1971 and Miss Texas 1970, is an American businesswoman, actress, and former sportscaster. She was also the First Lady of Kentucky from 1979 to 1983.

Randall Pinkston

Randall Pinkston was a correspondent/anchor for Al Jazeera America. Previously he was with CBS News. After a stint as a White House Correspondent in CBS's Washington Bureau, Pinkston became a general assignment reporter, contributing to CBS broadcasts, including CBS Evening News, Morning News, Weekend News, CBS News Sunday Morning and 48 Hours. Pinkston also contributed to the CBS Reports documentary, Legacy of Shame with Correspondent Dan Rather. Pinkston has filled in as anchor on the CBS Evening News-Weekend Edition, Up to the Minute and CBS Morning News.

The Early Show

The Early Show is an American morning television program that aired on CBS from November 1, 1999 to January 7, 2012, and the ninth attempt at a morning news-talk program by the network since 1954. The program aired Monday through Friday from 7:00 to 9:00 a.m. (live in the Eastern Time Zone, and on tape delay in all other time zones), although a number of affiliates either pre-empted or tape-delayed the Saturday edition. The program originally broadcast from the General Motors Building in New York City.

The Early Show, like many of its predecessors, traditionally placed third in the ratings, behind NBC's Today and ABC's Good Morning America. Much like Today and its fellow NBC program The Tonight Show, the Early Show title was analogous to that of CBS's late-night talk show, the Late Show. Unlike CBS' other attempts at a morning news program (which emphasize hard news), The Early Show followed the format of its two other competitors, which have long used a lighter soft news, lifestyle and infotainment approach.

On November 15, 2011, CBS announced the cancellation of The Early Show, and replacement by a new morning program that CBS News chairman Jeff Fager and president David Rhodes stated would "redefine the morning television landscape." The Early Show ended its twelve-year run on January 6, 2012, replaced three days later on January 9 by the second version of CBS This Morning.

We're Going to Make You a Star

We're Going To Make You a Star is a 1975 book Sally Quinn of her brief time with the CBS Morning News. In this book she discusses the CBS failure and reflects on her adolescence and how it, among other things, led to her failure as a television news anchor.

Sally Quinn grew up a general's daughter. She was acquainted with many diplomats and obtained a string of odd jobs around Washington, D.C. until she settled as a society reporter for the Washington Post. Quinn became notorious for her tough reviews. This is where the book begins but the real story is addressed after she is offered an anchor job for the CBS Morning News. She describes how reluctant she was about taking the job alongside Hughes Rudd and goes on to chronicle the failure of the show.

Quinn disclaims any responsibility for being unprepared and blames CBS for all that went wrong during the short life of this incarnation of the CBS Morning News. Scattered among the accounts of the broadcasting field Quinn offers an account of her personal relationships with big names such as Fred Friendly and Walter Cronkite.

Overnight/Early morning news programs in the United States
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