Buynaksk

Buynaksk (Russian: Буйна́кск; Kumyk: Шура/Темирхан-Шура, Shura/Temirkhan-Shura) is a town in the Republic of Dagestan, Russia, located at the foothills of the Greater Caucasus on the Shura-Ozen River, 40 kilometers (25 mi) southwest of the republic's capital Makhachkala. Population: 62,623 (2010 Census);[4] 61,437 (2002 Census);[9] 56,783 (1989 Census);[10] 40,000 (1970).

Buynaksk

Буйнакск
Other transcription(s)
 • KumykШура/Темирхан-Шура
Buynaksk in Winter
Buynaksk in Winter
Coat of arms of Buynaksk

Coat of arms
Location of Buynaksk
Buynaksk is located in Russia
Buynaksk
Buynaksk
Location of Buynaksk
Buynaksk is located in Republic of Dagestan
Buynaksk
Buynaksk
Buynaksk (Republic of Dagestan)
Coordinates: 42°49′N 47°07′E / 42.817°N 47.117°ECoordinates: 42°49′N 47°07′E / 42.817°N 47.117°E
CountryRussia
Federal subjectDagestan[1]
Founded1834[2]
Town status since1866[2]
Area
 • Total20.95 km2 (8.09 sq mi)
Elevation
490 m (1,610 ft)
Population
 • Total62,623
 • Estimate 
(2018)[5]
65,080 (+3.9%)
 • Rank255th in 2010
 • Density3,000/km2 (7,700/sq mi)
 • Subordinated toTown of Buynaksk[1]
 • Capital ofBuynaksky District[1], Town of Buynaksk[1]
 • Urban okrugBuynaksk Urban Okrug[6]
 • Capital ofBuynaksk Urban Okrug[6], Buynaksky Municipal District
OKTMO ID82705000001
Websitebuynaksk05.ru

History

Temir khan shoura bouinaksk dagestan
Temir-Khan-Shura in the 1900s

Before 1922 Buynaksk was known as Temir-Khan-Shurá (Темир-Хан-Шура), that is, the lake or cliff of Tamerlane who is said to have camped here in 1396 after defeating Tokhtamysh during the Tokhtamysh-Timur war. It first appears in Russian annals in the 1590s when Muscovite ambassadors passed nearby on their way to Georgia. It remained a small town ruled by a Bek. In 1830 the Russians destroyed it when it sided with Kazi Mulla. In 1832 a Russian force under Klugenau camped here during Rosen's raid on Gimry. In 1834 Klugenau built a fort on the rock above the lake and it soon became the headquarters of the Apsheron Regiment and the most important Russian fort in the interior of Degestan during the Murid War. In 1849 Hadji Murad led a daring raid into the town. The place was unhealthy and Argutinsky drained the lake in 1858 to prevent the spread of disease.[11] It was granted town status in 1866.[2] In 1920, it was the center of the ephemeral Mountainous Republic of the Northern Caucasus. On November 13, 1920, the government of the Russian SFSR declared Dagestan's autonomy during the congress of the Dagestani people, which took place in Temir-Khan-Shura. In 1922, the town was renamed Buynaksk in honor of a revolutionary Ullubiy Buynaksky. In May 1970, Buynaksk was badly damaged by an earthquake.

In 1999, a car bomb outside an apartment building housing the families of military officers killed sixty-four people.[12]

On August 13, 2009, Buynaksk was the site of two attacks associated with the growing violence throughout Dagestan and neighboring Chechnya. About ten men first opened fire with automatic weapons on a police post, killing four officers. The gunmen then entered a nearby sauna complex and killed seven female employees.[13]

Three soldiers were killed, and thirty-two were wounded, in a suicide car-bombing at a military base in the city on September 5, 2010. The driver of a Zhiguli car smashed through a gate at the base and headed for an area where soldiers were quartered in tents. Soldiers opened fire on the car before it reached the center of the base. The driver then rammed the car into a military truck, where it exploded. After the blast, a roadside bomb hit a car taking investigators to the scene, but no injuries were reported in the second explosion.[12] However, attackers claimed killing 56 Russian soldiers by the bombing.[14]

Administrative and municipal status

Within the framework of administrative divisions, Buynaksk serves as the administrative center of Buynaksky District, even though it is not a part of it.[1] As an administrative division, it is incorporated separately as the Town of Buynaksk—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts.[1] As a municipal division, the Town of Buynaksk is incorporated as Buynaksk Urban Okrug.[6]

Demographics

Ethnic groups (2002 census):[15]

Climate

Buynaksk has a humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification: Dfa).

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Law #16
  2. ^ a b c "General Information" (in Russian). Republic of Dagestan. Retrieved September 3, 2017.
  3. ^ http://www.gks.ru/dbscripts/munst/munst82/DBInet.cgi.
  4. ^ a b Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  5. ^ "26. Численность постоянного населения Российской Федерации по муниципальным образованиям на 1 января 2018 года". Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c Law #6
  7. ^ "Об исчислении времени". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации (in Russian). June 3, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  8. ^ Почта России. Информационно-вычислительный центр ОАСУ РПО. (Russian Post). Поиск объектов почтовой связи (Postal Objects Search) (in Russian)
  9. ^ Russian Federal State Statistics Service (May 21, 2004). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек" [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000] (XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian).
  10. ^ "Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров" [All Union Population Census of 1989: Present Population of Union and Autonomous Republics, Autonomous Oblasts and Okrugs, Krais, Oblasts, Districts, Urban Settlements, and Villages Serving as District Administrative Centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года [All-Union Population Census of 1989] (in Russian). Институт демографии Национального исследовательского университета: Высшая школа экономики [Institute of Demography at the National Research University: Higher School of Economics]. 1989 – via Demoscope Weekly.
  11. ^ John F. Baddeley, "The Rugged Flanks of the Caucasus", 1940, Chapter XIII
  12. ^ a b The Guardian. September 5, 2010. Three Russian Soldiers Die in Blast Retrieved September 5, 2010
  13. ^ The New York Times : 14 August 2009 : Clashes Kill Over 20 in Russia Region Retrieved September 5, 2010
  14. ^ Kavkazcentr
  15. ^ http://www.ethno-kavkaz.narod.ru/rndaghestan.html
  16. ^ "Climate: Buynaksk". Retrieved February 27, 2016.

Sources

  • Народное Собрание Республики Дагестан. Закон №16 от 10 апреля 2002 г. «Об административно-территориальном устройстве Республики Дагестан», в ред. Закона №106 от 30 декабря 2013 г. «О внесении изменений в некоторые законодательные акты Республики Дагестан». Вступил в силу со дня официального опубликования. Опубликован: "Дагестанская правда", №81, 12 апреля 2002 г. (People's Assembly of the Republic of Dagestan. Law #16 of April 10, 2002 On the Administrative-Territorial Structure of the Republic of Dagestan, as amended by the Law #106 of December 30, 2013 On Amending Various Legislative Acts of the Republic of Dagestan. Effective as of the day of the official publication.).
  • Народное Собрание Республики Дагестан. Закон №6 от 13 января 2005 г. «О статусе и границах муниципальных образований Республики Дагестан», в ред. Закона №43 от 30 апреля 2015 г. «О статусе городского округа с внутригородским делением "Город Махачкала", статусе и границах внутригородских районов в составе городского округа с внутригородским делением "Город Махачкала" и о внесении изменений в отдельные законодательные акты Республики Дагестан». Вступил в силу со дня официального опубликования. Опубликован: "Дагестанская правда", №8, 15 февраля 2005 г. (People's Assembly of the Republic of Dagestan. Law #6 of January 13, 2005 On the Status and Borders of the Municipal Formations of the Republic of Dagestan, as amended by the Law #43 of April 30, 2015 On the Status of the "City of Makhachkala" Urban Okrug with Intra-Urban Divisions, the Status and the Borders of the Intra-City Districts Comprising the "City of Makhachkala" Urban Okrug with Intra-Urban Divisions, and on Amending Various Legislative Acts of the Republic of Dagestan. Effective as of the day of the official publication.).
136th Guards Motor Rifle Brigade

The 136th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade is a mechanised infantry brigade of the Russian Ground Forces.

On December 1, 1993, the 136th Motor Rifle Brigade was established at Buynaksk, Dagestan. In 1996-97, the brigade was merged with the 204th Guards Motor Rifle Regiment "Uman-Berlin" as the 136th Guards Motor Rifle Brigade. The 204th Guards Motor Rifle Regiment was transferred to the North Caucasus at some point during the transformation of the 94th Guards Motor Rifle Division, returning from the GSFG, to become the 74th Guards Motor Rifle Brigade in the Siberian Military District.

58th Combined Arms Army

The 58th Army (Russian: 58-я общевойсковая армия (5th Combined Arms Army)) is an army of the Russian Ground Forces, headquartered at Vladikavkaz, North Ossetia-Alania, within Russia's Southern Military District. It was formed in 1941 as part of the Soviet Union's Red Army and has been part of the Russian Army since 1995.

Achemez Gochiyayev

Achemez Gochiyayev (born 1970 in Karachaevsk) is a Russian citizen who was accused of organizing the Russian apartment bombings, a series of terrorist acts in 1999 that killed 293 people and led the country into the Second Chechen War. The five bombings took place during two weeks between September 4 and September 16, 1999, in Moscow, and the southern towns of Buynaksk and Volgodonsk. Gochiyaev has not been arrested or convicted and remains a fugitive.

Administrative divisions of Dagestan

Cities and towns under republic's jurisdiction

Makhachkala (Махачкала) (capital)

city districts:

Kirovsky (Кировский)

Urban-type settlements under the city district's jurisdiction:

Leninkent (Ленинкент)

Semender (Семендер)

Sulak (Сулак)

Shamkhal (Шамхал)

Leninsky (Ленинский)

Urban-type settlements under the city district's jurisdiction:

Novy Kyakhulay (Новый Кяхулай)

Sovetsky (Советский)

Urban-type settlements under the city district's jurisdiction:

Alburikent (Альбурикент)

Kyakhulay (Кяхулай)

Tarki (Тарки)

Buynaksk (Буйнакск)

Dagestanskiye Ogni (Дагестанские Огни)

Derbent (Дербент)

Izberbash (Избербаш)

Kaspiysk (Каспийск)

Khasavyurt (Хасавюрт)

Kizilyurt (Кизилюрт)

Urban-type settlements under the town's jurisdiction:

Bavtugay (Бавтугай)

Novy Sulak (Новый Сулак)

Kizlyar (Кизляр)

Urban-type settlements under the town's jurisdiction:

Komsomolsky (Комсомольский)

Yuzhno-Sukhokumsk (Южно-Сухокумск)

Districts:

Agulsky (Агульский)

with 6 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Akhtynsky (Ахтынский)

with 4 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Akhvakhsky (Ахвахский)

with 7 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Akushinsky (Акушинский)

with 13 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Babayurtovsky (Бабаюртовский)

with 7 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Botlikhsky (Ботлихский)

with 9 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Buynaksky (Буйнакский)

with 9 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Charodinsky (Чародинский)

with 9 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Dakhadayevsky (Дахадаевский)

Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction:

Kubachi (Кубачи)

with 15 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Derbentsky (Дербентский)

Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction:

Belidzhi (Белиджи)

Mamedkala (Мамедкала)

with 7 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Dokuzparinsky (Докузпаринский)

with 2 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Gergebilsky (Гергебильский)

with 4 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Gumbetovsky (Гумбетовский)

with 6 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Gunibsky (Гунибский)

with 10 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Karabudakhkentsky (Карабудахкентский)

Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction:

Achi-Su (Ачи-Су)

Manas (Манас)

with 2 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Kayakentsky (Каякентский)

with 5 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Kaytagsky (Кайтагский)

with 12 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Kazbekovsky (Казбековский)

Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction:

Dubki (Дубки)

with 2 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Khasavyurtovsky (Хасавюртовский)

with 13 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Khivsky (Хивский)

with 11 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Khunzakhsky (Хунзахский)

with 16 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Kizilyurtovsky (Кизилюртовский)

with 3 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Kizlyarsky (Кизлярский)

with 19 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Kulinsky (Кулинский)

with 2 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Kumtorkalinsky (Кумторкалинский)

Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction:

Tyube (Тюбе)

with 1 selsovet under the district's jurisdiction.

Kurakhsky (Курахский)

with 10 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Laksky (Лакский)

with 16 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Levashinsky (Левашинский)

with 13 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Magaramkentsky (Магарамкентский)

with 8 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Nogaysky (Ногайский)

with 5 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Novolaksky (Новолакский)

with 3 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Rutulsky (Рутульский)

with 11 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Sergokalinsky (Сергокалинский)

with 10 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Shamilsky (Шамильский)

with 10 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Suleyman-Stalsky (Сулейман-Стальский)

with 10 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Tabasaransky (Табасаранский)

with 18 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Tarumovsky (Тарумовский)

with 5 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Tlyaratinsky (Тляратинский)

with 18 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Tsumadinsky (Цумадинский)

with 15 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Tsuntinsky (Цунтинский)

with 11 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Untsukulsky (Унцукульский)

Urban-type settlements under the district's jurisdiction

Shamilkala (Шамилькала)

with 6 selsovets under the district's jurisdiction.

Aleksey Galkin

Alexey Viktorovich Galkin (Russian: Алексей Викторович Галкин) is a former Russian GRU officer. A senior lieutenant of the GRU, Alexei Galkin said, whilst being tortured by Chechen separatists, commanded by Abu Movsaev, that the apartment bombing in Buynaksk were organized by a team of twelve GRU officers and ordered by GRU director Valentin Korabelnikov The interview of Galkin was conducted by journalist Robert Young Pelton,who was also interviewing Abu Movsaev, who wrote about it in his book Hunter, Hammer, Heaven, Dangerous Journeys Through Three Worlds Gone Mad. Galkin later escaped from Chechen separatists and stated that he was tortured to produce this confession

Aliaskhab Kebekov

Aliaskhab Alibulatovich Kebekov (Russian: Алиасхаб Алибулатович Кебеков; 1 January 1972 – 19 April 2015), also known as Ali Abu Muhammad (Russian: Али Абу Мухаммад), was a Dagestani militant Islamist in Russia and the leader of the Caucasus Emirate following the death of inaugural leader Dokka Umarov. Following in the same religious tradition as Umarov, he adhered to the ideology of Salafism. The United States Department of State added Kebekov to its list of Specially Designated Global Terrorists on March 25, 2015. On 19 April 2015, Kebekov was killed by Russian security forces during special operations in the settlement of Gerei-Avlak in Buynaksk. An Avar by nationality, Kebekov was the first non-Chechen to lead the North Caucasus insurgency.

Bakhtiyar Akhmedov

Bakhtiyar Shakhabutdinovich Akhmedov (Russian: Бахтияр Шахабутдинович Ахмедов, Kumyk: Ахмедланы Багьтияр Шагьабутдинны уланы; born 5 August 1987 in Buynaksk, Dagestan) is a Russian wrestler of Kumyk descent.

Akhmedov competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics in 120 kg category. In the finals, he lost to Artur Taymazov of Uzbekistan and was awarded silver medal. However, Taymazov was later stripped of his medal due to a positive doping test, thus Akhmedov was awarded gold.

Balanjar

Balanjar (Baranjar, Belenjer, Belendzher, Bülünjar) was a medieval city located in the North Caucasus region, between the cities of Derbent and Samandar, probably on the lower Sulak River. It flourished from the seventh to the tenth centuries CE. The legendary founder of Balanjar, according to the Arab chroniclers Ibn al-Faqih and Abu al-Fida, was named Balanjar ibn Yafith.

In the 630s CE Balanjar was a capital of the Baranjar state. Some scholars speculate that the name derives from the Turkic root "Bala" or "Great", and the clan-name "Endzhar". With the rest of the Baranjar domains the city became part of the Khazar Khaganate around 650; until the early 720s, Balanjar served as the capital of Khazaria. During the First Arab-Khazar War in the 650s, a Muslim army under Abd ar-Rahman ibn Rabiah was defeated outside the town (see Battle of Balanjar).

Around 722 or 723, Umayyad soldiers under Al-Jarrah ibn Abdallah crossed the Caucasus Mountains and attacked Balanjar. The inhabitants of Balanjar tried to defend their town by fastening 3,000 wagons together and circling them around the key fortress on high terrain, but were defeated in the attack. The Arabs massacred much of the town's population; survivors fled to other towns, including Samandar. The victorious Arab army stole much booty and the soldiers received large sums of money.

The city was rebuilt after the war, but the capital of Khazaria was thereafter moved to Samandar and later to Atil. Nevertheless, Balanjar continued to be a city of great importance within the Khaganate. After the fall of Khazaria, Balanjar lost much of its importance and declined steadily until it vanished from the record around 1100.

The exact location of Balanjar has not yet been established precisely. Soviet archeologist Mikhail Artamonov initially placed Balanjar on the site of the modern Daghestani city of Buynaksk, but when later the ruins of a town to the south of Makhachkala were found, he identified them as being those of Balanjar.

Boris Fogel

Boris Alexandrovich Fogel (Russian: Борис Александрович Фогель) (January 18, 1872 in Buynaksk, Russian Empire – 1961 in Leningrad) was a Russian and Soviet painter and art educator who lived and worked in Leningrad, a member of the Leningrad Union of the Soviet Artists, and a professor of painting at the Repin Institute of Arts who played an important role in the formation of the Leningrad School of Painting.

Buynaksky District

Buynaksky District (Russian: Буйнакский район, Kumyk: Шура якъ) is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the forty-one in the Republic of Dagestan, Russia. It is located in the center of the republic. The area of the district is 1,842.09 square kilometers (711.23 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Buynaksk (which is not administratively a part of the district). As of the 2010 Census, the total population of the district was 73,402.

Gadzhi Umarov

Gadzhi Umarov (born 6 May 1985 in Buynaksk) is a Russian taekwondo practitioner. He competed in the +80 kg event at the 2012 Summer Olympics; he was eliminated by François Coulombe-Fortier in the preliminary round.

Liberation Army of Dagestan

Liberation army of Dagestan (Dagestan Liberation Army, Army of the Liberation of Dagestan) was a nonexistent militant organization claimed by anonymous callers to be responsible for the 1999 Russian apartment bombings.

North Caucasus Military District

The North Caucasus Military District was a military district of the Russian Armed Forces, which became in 2010 the Southern Military District and lately also included the Black Sea Fleet and Caspian Flotilla.

It comprised the Republic of Adygeya, the Republic of Dagestan, the Republic of Ingushetia, the Kabardino-Balkar Republic, the Republic of Kalmykia, the Karachay–Cherkess Republic, the Republic of North Osetia-Alaniya, the Chechen Republic, Krasnodar Krai, Stavropol Krai, and Astrakhan, Volgograd, and Rostov oblasts. It has the same borders as the Southern Federal District. Its last commander was Lieutenant General Alexander Galkin, appointed from January 2010.

Pavel Mishchenko

Pavel Ivanovich Mishchenko (Russian: Па́вел Ива́нович Ми́щенко; Ukrainian: Павло Іванович Міщенко, Pavlo Ivanovych Mishchenko; 22 January 1853 - 1918 ) was a Imperial Russian career military officer and statesman of Ukrainian ethnicity of the Imperial Russian Army.

Rappani Khalilov

Rappani Khalilov (Russian: Раппани Халилов) (October 27, 1969 – September 17, 2007), also known as Rabbani, was the militant leader of the Shariat Jamaat of the Caucasian Front during the Second Chechen War, in the volatile southern Russian republic of Dagestan. He was killed on September 17, 2007 in a fierce shoot-out with the Russian special forces.

Russian apartment bombings

The Russian apartment bombings were a series of explosions that hit four apartment blocks in the Russian cities of Buynaksk, Moscow and Volgodonsk between 4 and 16 September 1999, killing 367 people and injuring more than 1,000, spreading a wave of fear across the country. To date, no one has taken responsibility for the bombings; the Russian government blamed Chechen militants, although they, along with Chechen president Aslan Maskhadov, denied responsibility. The bombings, together with the Dagestan War, led the country into the Second Chechen War. Then-Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's handling of the crisis boosted his popularity and helped him attain the presidency within a few months.On 22 September, an explosive device similar to those used in the bombings was found and defused in an apartment block in the Russian city of Ryazan. The next day, Putin praised the vigilance of the inhabitants of Ryazan and ordered the air bombing of Grozny, marking the beginning of the Second Chechen War. Thirty-six hours later, local police arrested the perpetrators, who were discovered to in fact be three FSB agents. The Russian government declared that the incident had simply been a training exercise, and the agents were released on Moscow's orders.Parliament member Yuri Shchekochikhin filed two motions for a parliamentary investigation, but the motions were rejected by the Russian Duma in March 2000. An independent public commission to investigate the bombings was chaired by Duma deputy Sergei Kovalev, but the commission was rendered ineffective due to the Russian government's refusal to respond to its inquiries. The official Russian investigation of the bombings was completed in 2002 and concluded that all the bombings were organised and led by Achemez Gochiyayev, who remains at large, and ordered by Islamist warlords Ibn Al-Khattab and Abu Omar al-Saif, who have been killed. Five other suspects have been killed and six have been convicted by Russian courts on terrorism-related charges.

A number of historians and observers have stated that the bombings were a false flag attempt, coordinated by Russian state security services to bring Putin into the presidency. Those who hold this view point to a number of pieces of evidence, including the Ryazan incident, the fact that the Volgodonsk bombing was erroneously announced three days before it happened by Russian Duma speaker Gennadiy Seleznyov, and the fact that supposed prime suspect Achemez Gochiyayev told police that he was being set up by the FSB, and notified police about two still-unexploded bombs, which they were able to find and deactivate in time. Also notable are the untimely deaths of various observers who called the official story into question: Kovalev Commission members Sergei Yushenkov and Yuri Shchekochikhin (both of whom were apparently assassinated in 2003), and former FSB officer Alexander Litvinenko, who blamed the FSB for the bombings in two books, and was poisoned by FSB agents in London in 2006. Additionally, the Commission's lawyer and investigator, Mikhail Trepashkin, was arrested and served four years in prison for revealing state secrets.

Salavat Salavatov

Salavat Magomedovich Salavatov (Russian: Салава́т Магоме́дович Салава́тов; 21 May 1922, Buynaksk — 5 July 2005, Moscow) was a Russian and Soviet landscape painter and book illustrator. He has been given the title of Honored Artists of the RSFSR and People's Artist of Dagestan. Salavatov illustrated more than 100 books. In 2006, an art gallery in one of Moscow's secondary schools was named in his honor. In 2017, a memorial plate was installed in memory of Salavatov in Makhachkala.

Shamil Burziyev

Shamil Gasanovich Burziyev (Russian: Шамиль Гасанович Бурзиев; 1 April 1985 – 5 December 2010) was a Russian professional football player.

Tymerlan Huseynov

Tymerlan Rustamovych Huseynov (Ukrainian: Тимерлан Рустамович Гусейнов; born 24 January 1968) is a former Ukrainian footballer who is now sporting director of FC Dniester Ovidiopol. He was the Ukrainian Premier League's top goalscorer in the 1993–94 and 1995–96 seasons (both with Chornomorets Odessa) scoring 18 and 20 goals respectively, and scored 8 goals in 14 internationals.

Climate data for Buynaksk
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 1.0
(33.8)
1.9
(35.4)
6.4
(43.5)
13.7
(56.7)
20.4
(68.7)
24.8
(76.6)
27.6
(81.7)
26.6
(79.9)
21.6
(70.9)
15.5
(59.9)
8.5
(47.3)
3.7
(38.7)
14.3
(57.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) −2.2
(28.0)
−1.3
(29.7)
3.0
(37.4)
9.2
(48.6)
15.9
(60.6)
20.2
(68.4)
23.1
(73.6)
22.3
(72.1)
17.1
(62.8)
11.5
(52.7)
5.2
(41.4)
0.7
(33.3)
10.4
(50.7)
Average low °C (°F) −5.3
(22.5)
−4.4
(24.1)
−0.4
(31.3)
4.8
(40.6)
11.4
(52.5)
15.6
(60.1)
18.6
(65.5)
18.0
(64.4)
12.7
(54.9)
7.6
(45.7)
2.0
(35.6)
−2.2
(28.0)
6.5
(43.8)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 17
(0.7)
23
(0.9)
22
(0.9)
30
(1.2)
58
(2.3)
65
(2.6)
53
(2.1)
42
(1.7)
51
(2.0)
41
(1.6)
30
(1.2)
19
(0.7)
451
(17.9)
Source: Climate-Data.org [16]
Districts
Cities and towns
Urban-type settlements

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