Butch Davis

Paul Hilton "Butch" Davis Jr. (born November 17, 1951) is an American football coach. He is the head football coach at Florida International University. After graduating from the University of Arkansas, he became an assistant college football coach at Oklahoma State University and the University of Miami before becoming the defensive coordinator for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He was head coach of the University of Miami's Hurricanes football team from 1995 to 2000 and the NFL's Cleveland Browns from 2001 to 2004. Davis served as the head coach of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) Tar Heels football team from 2007 until the summer of 2011, when a series of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) investigations resulted in his dismissal. He was hired by the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers as an advisor in February 2012.

Butch Davis
2018-0719-CUSAMD-ButchDavis
Davis at 2018 C-USA Kickoff
Current position
TitleHead coach
TeamFIU
ConferenceC-USA
Record17–9
Annual salary$1 million
Biographical details
BornNovember 17, 1951 (age 67)
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
Playing career
1970Arkansas
Position(s)Defensive end
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1973Fayetteville HS (AR) (DC)
1974–1975Pawhuska HS (OK) (DC)
1976–1977Charles Page HS (OK) (DC)
1978Will Rogers HS (OK)
1979–1983Oklahoma State (TE/WR)
1984–1988Miami (FL) (DL)
1989–1992Dallas Cowboys (DL)
1993–1994Dallas Cowboys (DC)
1995–2000Miami (FL)
2001–2004Cleveland Browns
2007–2010North Carolina
2017–presentFIU
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
2002–2004Cleveland Browns (GM)
2012–2013Tampa Bay Buccaneers (advisor)
Head coaching record
Overall80–52 (college)
24–35 (NFL)
Bowls6–3
Accomplishments and honors
Championships

Early years

Davis was born on November 17, 1951, in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, to Paul and Pat Davis. He attended high school at Bixby High School in Bixby, Oklahoma where he was an all-state fullback and defensive end for the Spartans football team and graduated in 1970. After graduation, he attended the University of Arkansas and played defensive end for the Razorbacks. Due to a knee injury, Davis was sidelined after his freshman year and became a student assistant for the rest of his college career. After graduation from college, he held assistant coaching positions at several high schools, including Fayetteville High School in 1973, Pawhuska High School from 1974 to 1975, and Charles Page High School in Sand Springs, Oklahoma from 1976 to 1977. He held his first head coaching job at Will Rogers High School in 1978.

In 1979, Butch began a successful 15-year association with Jimmy Johnson, first as a receivers and tight ends coach at Oklahoma State University for the Cowboys, then later as defensive line coach at the University of Miami. During that time, the 1987 Miami Hurricanes football team won the NCAA Division I-A national football championship.

Coaching career

Dallas Cowboys

Davis followed Jimmy Johnson to Dallas, where Davis was promoted to defensive coordinator of the Dallas Cowboys in 1993 after the departure of Dave Wannstedt. As defensive coordinator and coach of the defensive line, he helped Johnson and new owner Jerry Jones win back-to-back Super Bowls with a Dallas Cowboys team that had gone 1–15 in 1989, Johnson's first year as head coach. After Johnson left, Davis continued at Dallas for one more year as assistant coach under Barry Switzer.

University of Miami

Davis was hired as the head football coach at the University of Miami in January 1995.[1] Not long after Davis' arrival, the Hurricanes were found to have committed several violations of NCAA rules during the tenure of his predecessor, Dennis Erickson.[2] As a result, the Hurricanes were barred from postseason play in his first year (despite an 8–3 record) and lost 31 football scholarship spots over several years. Davis earned a 51–20 record during his tenure as head coach. During Davis' final year as head coach, the Hurricanes finished 11–1, their best season since coming up one win short of the 1992 national championship. Despite finishing second in both human polls, a quirk in the Bowl Championship Series formula resulted in the Hurricanes being shut out of that year's national championship game, the 2001 Orange Bowl. The Hurricanes were passed over in favor of the Florida State Seminoles, even though the Seminoles had lost to the Hurricanes that year when a last-second field goal attempt sailed wide right. The Seminoles ultimately lost the Orange Bowl to the Oklahoma Sooners 13–2. The snub ultimately led the BCS to add a "quality win" bonus to its formula, which gave extra credit for beating a top-ten team. The Hurricanes earned recognition from the American Football Coaches Association for outstanding graduation rates in each of his six seasons at Miami.

Numerous professional football players were coached or recruited by Davis in his time at Miami, such as Ray Lewis, Ed Reed, Andre Johnson, Clinton Portis, Edgerrin James, Reggie Wayne and Jeremy Shockey.

Cleveland Browns

Davis became head coach of the Cleveland Browns in 2001, inheriting a team that won five games combined in the previous two years. Davis led the team to a 7–9 record in his first year, missing the playoffs by a game. One of the most controversial refereeing moments in NFL history, Bottlegate, effectively stole a win from the Browns. His defense that year forced a league leading 33 interceptions. The Browns posted a 9–7 record and got a playoff berth in Davis' second year, getting in after winning two close games in a row against the Baltimore Ravens and the Atlanta Falcons. In 2003, a quarterback controversy erupted between Tim Couch and backup Kelly Holcomb after Holcomb, starting the 2002 playoff game for the injured Couch, threw for 429 yards and three touchdowns. Davis would ultimately give the starting job to Holcomb, though Couch did start a few games. In the 2004 offseason, Davis signed Jeff Garcia and cut Couch. Davis was forced to resign in early December 2004 after a 3–8 start and ended with a 24–35 overall record as coach of the Browns. As of 2019, Davis is the only coach to lead the expansion Browns to a playoff game.

University of North Carolina

Butch Davis
Davis at the 2007 ACC Football Kickoff

On November 13, 2006, University of North Carolina athletic director Dick Baddour announced that Davis had been hired as the school's new head football coach. On November 27, 2006, Davis officially succeeded John Bunting, who was fired in October 2006 after posting one winning season in the previous six seasons as head coach of the Tar Heels. Davis took over a program that had seen three winning seasons in the past eight years and had won more than six games in a season two other times.

During his first season as head coach, the 2007 Tar Heels finished 4–8, with six of those losses coming by a touchdown or less and two coming against teams ranked in the top 15 at the time. Despite a losing record in 2007, North Carolina fans averaged over 57,000 fans in Kenan Stadium during the season, the highest average attendance since the Mack Brown era. The 2007 matchup against South Carolina saw a crowd of 61,000, the second-largest in school history. During the season, suspicion mounted that Davis would leave UNC after his first year if the head coaching job at his alma mater, Arkansas, opened up. The rumors grew louder when Houston Nutt was forced to resign at Arkansas, but Davis denied he was leaving. On November 21, 2007, Davis agreed to a one-year contract extension, along with a raise of about $291,000 annually. Davis said in a statement that one year at UNC convinced him that this was where he wanted to be, and that he intended to have "a long and successful career in Chapel Hill."[3] Davis originally signed a seven-year deal worth approximately $1.86 million per season, with a base salary of $286,000. Additionally, he received $25,000 a year in expenses and a supplement from the Educational Foundation (Ram's Club) that ranged from $1 million in 2007 to $1.3 million in 2013. Baddour said he could not release all the details of the contract until it was approved by the school's board of trustees, but did say the base salary would rise $29,000, the expenses would go up $5,000, and Davis’ supplemental income would go up $100,000.

The 2008 North Carolina Tar Heels football team were expected to be much improved from the previous year, with most outlets picking them to finish second in the Coastal Division. On October 4, the Heels defeated the then 24th-ranked Connecticut Huskies 38–12 for their first victory over a ranked non-conference opponent in 11 years. As a result, the Tar Heels were ranked 22nd in the weekly Associated Press rankings, their first appearance in a major poll in seven years. The following Saturday, the Tar Heels defeated the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, their first regular-season win as a ranked team in 11 years. A crowd of 60,500, third-largest in school history, watched the Tar Heels play the Fighting Irish. A 16–13 overtime loss at Virginia on October 18 briefly knocked the Heels out of the rankings, but after a 45-24 victory over Boston College on October 25, the team became bowl-eligible for the first time since 2004. The win also resulted in the team being ranked in the Bowl Championship Series rankings for the first time since the BCS began in 1998. A week later, they defeated Georgia Tech to clinch their first winning season since 2001, and only their fourth since Brown left the school after the 1997 season. The Tar Heels lost three of their last four games, including a loss in the Meineke Car Care Bowl to West Virginia.

ButchDavisFSU
Davis coming through campus before UNC's game against Florida State in 2009

Davis led the 2009 Tar Heels to another 8–4 regular season record and a second straight bowl appearance, the first time since the 1997–1998 seasons that UNC had made consecutive bowl appearances. A loss to North Carolina State in the final game of the season sent them back to the Meineke Car Care Bowl. UNC faced the Pittsburgh Panthers on December 26, 2009 and lost for the second straight year, giving UNC another 8-5 final record. Additionally, Davis led Carolina football to its 6th consecutive year of graduating more than 75% of its football players. The America Football Coaches Association recognized fewer than 30 public universities for superior graduation rates last year, with UNC the only such institution in the state of North Carolina and the Atlantic Coast Conference.[4]

Academic misconduct

In July 2010, the NCAA began investigating violations involving improper benefits provided by agents to current players at UNC.[5] In September 2010, the NCAA opened a second prong of its investigation, this time involving possible improper tutor involvement with UNC student-athletes.[6] In response to the investigation, local and national sports columnists called for Davis' termination,[7][8] but some North Carolina fans still supported the coach.[9] A survey of UNC fans reflected strong support for Coach Davis despite the ongoing investigation.[10] Thirteen UNC football players were suspended for the team's season opener in Atlanta against the Louisiana State University Tigers, and the Tar Heels lost the game 30–24. The Tar Heels later lost to ACC rivals Miami, Georgia Tech, Virginia Tech, and NC State, but won their first game since 1981 in Virginia's Scott Stadium and gained their first win ever in FSU's Doak Campbell Stadium. In October 2010, wide receiver Greg Little, defensive tackle Marvin Austin, and defensive end Robert Quinn were ruled permanently ineligible after it was discovered they improperly accepted gifts from sports agents. Five other players were found guilty of accepting improper benefits and/or inappropriate academic assistance.[11] On July 27, 2011, Davis was fired by UNC chancellor Holden Thorp amid an NCAA investigation of academic misconduct and allegations players receiving improper benefits from agents.[12] Thorp said the move was necessary to restore confidence in UNC's integrity.[13] On September 19, 2011, in response to an NCAA notice of allegations, Davis was never mentioned in the NCAA inquiry and had no involvement in the investigation.

North Carolina subsequently vacated all of its wins from the 2008 and 2009 seasons after retroactively declaring Austin, Quinn and Little ineligible.[14] As a result, these are "officially" North Carolina's only winless seasons in the modern era.

In 2013, Davis told CBS Sports' Bruce Feldman that he believed his firing was an "overreaction" by Thorp, in the belief that "if he released me, maybe the investigation of the football program would go in a different direction." Around the same time, Baddour told Feldman that firing Davis "was not my recommendation." Baddour added that Thorp was well aware that he wanted Davis to remain as coach.[15]

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

In February 2012, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers hired Davis as a special assistant to newly hired head coach Greg Schiano. The terms of Davis' settlement with the University of North Carolina prevented him from taking a coaching position, and he was instead hired as an advisor to Schiano, who was the defensive coordinator under Davis at the University of Miami.[16]

Florida International University

On November 14, 2016, Davis confirmed he was leaving his analyst position at ESPN and agreed to a five-year contract to take the head coaching job at Florida International.[17]

Coaching tree

Several of Davis' assistant coaches from his head coaching positions have gone on to be NFL and college football head coaches. Three of the coordinators from his time at the University of Miami would go on to be head coaches at either the NCAA or NFL level. Special teams coach Chuck Pagano would become the head coach of the Indianapolis Colts, Greg Schiano would become head coach at Rutgers and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and Larry Coker became the head coach of the University of Miami following Davis' departure and later coached at The University of Texas at San Antonio.

Oregon head coach Mario Cristobal served under Davis as a graduate assistant from 1998 to 2000. Randy Shannon served as the linebackers coach for Davis' first three years at Miami. Former Tulane head coach Curtis Johnson was an assistant under Davis at Miami. Davis' tight ends coach at Miami, Rob Chudzinski, is a former head coach of the Cleveland Browns. Chudzinski also worked in Cleveland when Davis was the head coach of the Browns.

While with the Cleveland Browns and the North Carolina Tar Heels, three of Davis' assistant coaches went on to serve as head coaches in some capacity. Everett Withers replaced him as the head coach at North Carolina for the 2011 season. Withers was the head coach at Texas State University until 2018 when he was fired. The secondary coach in Cleveland under Davis, Todd Bowles served as the interim head coach of the Miami Dolphins in 2011 and is now the head coach for the New York Jets.[18] Davis' special teams coach in Cleveland in 2004, Taver Johnson, served as the interim head coach of Arkansas for a brief time during the spring following Bobby Petrino's departure and currently is the cornerbacks coach. Bruce Arians served as offensive coordinator for the Cleveland Browns under Davis from 2001-2003. After stints as the offensive coordinator for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Indianapolis Colts, Arians served as the interim head coach for the Colts and was the head coach of the Arizona Cardinals from 2013–2017[19].

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Miami Hurricanes (Big East Conference) (1995–2000)
1995 Miami 8–3 6–1 T–1st 20
1996 Miami 9–3 6–1 T–1st W Carquest 14 14
1997 Miami 5–6 3–4 T–5th
1998 Miami 9–3 5–2 T–2nd W Micron PC 21 20
1999 Miami 9–4 6–1 2nd W Gator 15 15
2000 Miami 11–1 7–0 1st W Sugar 2 2
Miami: 51–20 33–9
North Carolina Tar Heels (Atlantic Coast Conference) (2007–2010)
2007 North Carolina 4–8 3–5 4th (Coastal)
2008 North Carolina 0–5* 0–4* T–3rd (Coastal) L Meineke Car Care
2009 North Carolina 0–5* 0–4* 4th (Coastal) L Meineke Car Care
2010 North Carolina 8–5 4–4 T–3rd (Coastal) W Music City
North Carolina: 12–23 7–17
FIU Panthers (Conference USA) (2017–present)
2017 FIU 8–5 5–3 2nd (East) L Gasparilla
2018 FIU 9–4 6–2 T–2nd (East) W Bahamas
FIU: 17–9 11–5
Total: 80–52
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

* North Carolina self-imposed a penalty of vacating 16 wins in the 2008 and 2009 seasons due to NCAA violations.[20]

NFL

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
CLE 2001 7 9 0 .438 3rd in AFC Central - - - -
CLE 2002 9 7 0 .563 2nd in AFC North 0 1 .000 Lost to Pittsburgh Steelers in AFC Wild Card Game.
CLE 2003 5 11 0 .313 4th in AFC North - - - -
CLE 2004 3 8 0 .273 4th in AFC North - - - -
CLE Total 24 35 0 .407 0 1 .000 -
Total[21] 24 35 0 .407 0 1 .000 -

References

  1. ^ "Davis Named Coach at Miami". The New York Times. January 24, 1995. Retrieved December 7, 2012.
  2. ^ Wallace, William (August 4, 1995). "PRO FOOTBALL; Miami Awaits Ruling by the N.C.A.A." The New York Times. Retrieved December 7, 2012.
  3. ^ "Tar Heel football coach agrees to extend current contract pending approval of Board of Trustees"Archived December 24, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 28, 2010. Retrieved November 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 22, 2010. Retrieved July 23, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 29, 2010. Retrieved September 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 13, 2010. Retrieved November 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 6, 2010. Retrieved November 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 12, 2012. Retrieved November 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ "UNC fans' survey indicates support for Butch Davis". Raleigh News and Observer. October 21, 2010. Archived from the original on March 12, 2012.
  11. ^ "Five Dismissed, 3 Suspended; Probe of Football Continues". Carolina Alumni Review. October 11, 2010.
  12. ^ "UNC's Butch Davis fired". WTVD 11. July 27, 2011.
  13. ^ "Carolina makes a football coaching change" (pdf). WRAL Sports Fan. Retrieved December 7, 2012.
  14. ^ "Timeline of events in the UNC scandal". The News & Observer. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  15. ^ Feldman, Bruce. Despite being cleared in scandal at UNC, Davis still waiting for a gig. CBS Sports, December 19, 2013.
  16. ^ "Dominik: Davis wants to be an 'extra set of eyes,' not coach". Tampa Bay Times. February 14, 2012. Archived from the original on March 19, 2012. Retrieved March 19, 2012.
  17. ^ "FIU hires ESPN's Butch Davis to be its next head coach". ESPN. November 15, 2016.
  18. ^ Gregg Rosenthal (January 11, 2012). "Todd Bowles will interview with Raiders". NBC Sports.
  19. ^ Kent Somers (January 1, 2018). "Cardinals coach Bruce Arians retires after five seasons". USA Today.
  20. ^ William H. King, III; William H. Brooks. "Response to Notice of Allegations, Case Number M357" (PDF). The University of North Carolina eat Chapel Hill.
  21. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/coaches/DaviBu0.htmButch Davis Record, Statistics, and Category Ranks - Pro-Football-Reference.com Archived November 23, 2017, at the Wayback Machine

External links

1995 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1995 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1995 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Hurricanes' 70th season of football and 5th as a member of the Big East Conference. The Hurricanes were led by first-year head coach Butch Davis and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 8–3 overall and 6–1 in the Big East to finish as conference co-champion. They served a one-year bowl ban due to NCAA sanctions that were levied at the end of the season.

1996 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1996 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1996 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Hurricanes' 71st season of football and 6th as a member of the Big East Conference. The Hurricanes were led by second-year head coach Butch Davis and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 9–3 overall and 6–1 in the Big East to finish as conference co-champion. They were invited to the Carquest Bowl where they defeated Virginia, 31-21.

1997 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1997 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1997 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Hurricanes' 72nd season of football and 7th as a member of the Big East Conference. The Hurricanes were led by third-year head coach Butch Davis and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 5–6 overall and 3-4 in the Big East to finish in a three-way tie for fifth place.

1998 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1998 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1998 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Hurricanes' 73rd season of football and 8th as a member of the Big East Conference. The Hurricanes were led by fourth-year head coach Butch Davis and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 9–3 overall and 5–2 in the Big East to finish in a three-way tie for second place. They were invited to the MicronPC Bowl where they defeated NC State, 46-23.

1999 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1999 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1999 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Hurricanes' 74th season of football and 9th as a member of the Big East Conference. The Hurricanes were led by fifth-year head coach Butch Davis and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 9–4 overall and 6–1 in the Big East to finish in second place. They were invited to the Gator Bowl where they defeated Georgia Tech, 28-13.

2000 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 2000 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 2000 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Hurricanes' 75th season of football and 10th as a member of the Big East Conference. The Hurricanes were led by sixth-year head coach Butch Davis and played their home games at the Orange Bowl. They finished the season 11–1 overall and 7–0 in the Big East to finish as conference champion. They were invited to the Sugar Bowl where they defeated Florida, 37–20.

2004 Cleveland Browns season

The 2004 Cleveland Browns season was the team’s 56th season and 52nd with the National Football League. The Browns were looking to improve on their 5–11 record from 2003 and return to their 2002 playoff position; however, hindered by a tough schedule they regressed further and only won four games. On November 30, Butch Davis resigned as Head Coach and General Manager of the team. He was succeeded by offensive coordinator Terry Robiskie. Robiskie promoted tight end coach Rob Chudzinski to offensive coordinator.

2007 North Carolina Tar Heels football team

The 2007 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina in the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Tar Heels played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference. They were led by first-year head coach Butch Davis.

2008 North Carolina Tar Heels football team

The 2008 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina in the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Tar Heels played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference, and were led by second-year coach Butch Davis. The Tar Heels began their season on August 30 against McNeese State at Kenan Memorial Stadium. The team went 4–4 in conference play and 8–5 overall, but in 2011, North Carolina vacated all its wins from the 2008 and 2009 seasons.

2017 FIU Panthers football team

The 2017 FIU Panthers football team represented Florida International University in the 2017 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Panthers played their home games at the Riccardo Silva Stadium in Miami, Florida as members of the East Division of Conference USA (C–USA). They were led by first-year head coach Butch Davis. The Panthers finished the season 8–5, 5–3 in C-USA play to finish in second place in the East Division. They received an invitation to the Gasparilla Bowl where they lost to Temple.

2019 FIU Panthers football team

The 2019 FIU Panthers football team represents Florida International University (FIU) in the 2019 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Panthers play their home games at Riccardo Silva Stadium in Miami, Florida and compete in the East Division of Conference USA (CUSA). They are led by third-year head coach Butch Davis.

Butch Davis (baseball)

Wallace McArthur "Butch" Davis (born June 19, 1958) is an American former professional baseball Major League Baseball outfielder and current hitting coach for the Norfolk Tides.

College Scoreboard

College Scoreboard was a program that aired on NFL Network that debuted in 2006, and ended in 2007. The program was hosted by Paul Burmeister with analysis from Butch Davis and Mike Mayock.

FIU Panthers football

FIU Panthers football program represents Florida International University (FIU) in the sport of American football. The Panthers compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the East Division of Conference USA (CUSA). The Panthers' head coach is Butch Davis. FIU has produced a Sun Belt Conference co-championship team in 2010, along with 3 postseason bowl appearances. The Panthers play their home games at Riccardo Silva Stadium which has a seating capacity of 23,500.

List of Cleveland Browns head coaches

The Cleveland Browns are a professional American football franchise based in Cleveland, Ohio. They are a member of the North Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The team began playing in 1946 as a charter member of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC), and joined the NFL as part of the AAFC–NFL merger in 1950. The team played their home games at Cleveland Stadium from 1946 to 1995 before moving to FirstEnergy Stadium, where they have played since 1999. The Browns did not play from 1996 to 1998 when the team's owner, Art Modell, moved the team to Baltimore, Maryland and formed the Baltimore Ravens. The team was re-activated under new ownership in Cleveland in 1999. The team is currently owned by Jimmy Haslam III, and Joe Banner is their Chief Executive Officer. Tom Heckert was their general manager until the end of the 2012 season, when he was fired along with the team's incumbent head coach Pat Shurmur.There have been 17 non-interim head coaches for the Browns franchise. Their first head coach was Paul Brown, who coached for 17 complete seasons. Brown is also the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular season games coached (214), the most regular season game wins (158), the most playoffs games coached (14), and the most playoff game wins (9). Brown is the only Browns head coach to win an AAFC championship with four, the NFL championship with three, the Sporting News NFL Coach of the Year three times, the United Press International (UPI) NFL Coach of the Year once, and to have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as a coach. Blanton Collier, Dick Modzelewski, Sam Rutigliano, Bud Carson, Jim Shofner, Chris Palmer, Butch Davis, and Rob Chudzinski have spent their entire NFL head coaching careers with the Browns. Eric Mangini had been the head coach of the Browns since the firing of Romeo Crennel, but was himself fired on January 3, 2011. Shurmur replaced Mangini as head coach, but was fired after posting a 9–23 record over two seasons in charge. On January 11, 2013, the Cleveland Browns officially named Rob Chudzinski as the replacement for Pat Shurmur. Chudzinski compiled a 4–12 record during the 2013 season, but he was fired on December 29. On January 23, 2014, the Browns hired Mike Pettine as their head coach. Pettine was fired on January 3, 2016, hours after the Browns lost their 2015 season finale. On January 13, 2016, Hue Jackson was named the Browns' new head coach. He was then fired on October 29, 2018 after only 3 wins in 40 games. He was replaced by defensive coordinator Gregg Williams on an interim basis. On January 9, 2019, Freddie Kitchens was promoted from interim offensive coordinator to head coach.

List of FIU Panthers head football coaches

The FIU Panthers college football team represents Florida International University (FIU) in the East Division of Conference USA (C-USA). The Panthers compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 4 full-time head coaches since it began play during the 2002 season.

The team has played more than 2000 games over 17 seasons. In that time, only two Head Coaches have led the Panthers to postseason bowl games: Mario Cristobal and Butch Davis. FIU has a 2-2 record in four bowl games in which they have competed. The Panthers have been Co-Conference Champions once: in 2010 by Cristobal, during the Panther’s time in the Sun Belt Conference.

Cristobal spent the most seasons (6) as the Panther’s head coach and took the program to its only bowl games until Davis. The highest winning percentage by any coach is by Butch Davis, head coach since the 2017 season, who is 17-9 in two seasons with the Panthers.

The lowest winning percentage for any coach is Ron Turner, who went 10-30 (.250) in four seasons.

The current head coach of the Panthers will be Butch Davis, who was hired in November 2016. Davis is the former Miami and North Carolina head coach and has been an college football analyst for ESPN.

List of North Carolina Tar Heels bowl games

The North Carolina Tar Heels football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), representing the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Since the establishment of the team in 1888, North Carolina has appeared in 33 bowl games, including three combined appearances in the traditional "big four" bowl games (the Rose, Sugar, Cotton, and Orange).North Carolina's first bowl game was in 1947, when head coach Carl Snavely led them to the Sugar Bowl, where they lost to Georgia 20–10. Snavely led the Tar Heels to another Sugar Bowl and one Cotton Bowl, which both resulted in losses for the Tar Heels. Taking over for Snavely following the 1952 season was George Barclay, who did not lead the Tar Heels to any bowl games during his three-season tenure. Barclay's successor, Jim Tatum, coached for three years without reaching a bowl game. Jim Hickey replaced Tatum after the 1958 season and coached North Carolina to one bowl game, the 1963 Gator Bowl, where they won their first bowl game in program history.Bill Dooley succeeded Hickey as head coach and led the Tar Heels to six bowl games through his eleven-season run as head coach. Of the six bowls Dooley led North Carolina to, they won only one, the 1972 Sun Bowl. Dick Crum took over as head coach before the 1978 season. Crum led the Tar Heels to four consecutive bowl victories before losing the final two of his tenure at Carolina. Crum handed over control of the program to Mack Brown after the 1987 season. Brown assisted the Tar Heels into making a bowl game in six straight seasons; however, before the 1998 Gator Bowl, Brown accepted the head coaching position at the University of Texas at Austin and was subsequently barred from coaching in the bowl game. Defensive coordinator Carl Torbush was promoted to head coach. Torbush led the Tar Heels to two bowl victories – the 1998 Gator Bowl and the 1998 Las Vegas Bowl – before being let go after the 2000 season.North Carolina alum John Bunting was hired as coach before the 2001 season. Bunting led the Tar Heels to a 16–10 Peach Bowl victory in his inaugural season, and later to the 2004 Continental Tire Bowl, where they lost to Boston College. Bunting was dismissed after the 2006 season. North Carolina's then Athletic Director, Dick Baddour, subsequently hired Butch Davis to be the coach of the Tar Heels. Davis brought the Tar Heels to three bowl games before being fired in the midst of an NCAA investigation into the North Carolina football program. Everett Withers took over the program as the interim head coach for the 2011 season. Withers helped the Tar Heels become bowl-eligible and participate in the 2011 Independence Bowl, where they lost by seventeen points to the Missouri Tigers. Larry Fedora, coming off of a successful season as the head coach for the Southern Miss Golden Eagles football team, was hired to be the next head coach for the Tar Heels. After obtaining a bowl eligible record but not being able to play in the postseason due to self-imposed sanctions in his first year, Fedora led North Carolina to a victory in the Belk Bowl over Cincinnati in his second season.

List of North Carolina Tar Heels head football coaches

The North Carolina Tar Heels college football team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The Tar Heels compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 34 head coaches, and one interim head coach, since it began play during the 1888 season. Since January 2012, Larry Fedora has served as North Carolina's head coach.Playing as the Tar Heels, the team has played more than 1,100 games over 122 seasons. In that time, 10 coaches have led the Tar Heels in postseason bowl games: Carl Snavely, Jim Hickey, Bill Dooley, Dick Crum, Mack Brown, Carl Torbush, John Bunting, Butch Davis, Everett Withers, and Larry Fedora. Four of those coaches also won conference championships: Snavely captured three as a member of the Southern Conference and Hickey, Dooley, and Crum won a combined five as a member of the ACC.Crum is the leader in games won (72) during his 10 years with the program. Branch Bocock has the highest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .812. Gene McEver has the lowest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .067. Of the 33 different head coaches who have led the Tar Heels, Jim Tatum and Snavely have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana.

North Carolina Tar Heels football

The North Carolina Tar Heels football team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the sport of American football. The Tar Heels have played in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Being the oldest public university and oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school is nicknamed "Carolina" in athletics. The program's title in football is "Carolina Football".

North Carolina has played in 31 bowl games in its history and won three Southern Conference championships and five Atlantic Coast Conference titles. Thirty Tar Heel players have been honored as first-team All-Americas on 38 occasions. Carolina had 32 All-Southern Conference selections when it played in that league until 1952 and since joining the ACC in 1953, has had 174 first-team All-ACC choices. Since joining the Atlantic Coast Conference in 1953, the team has won five conference championships, with the most recent title coming in 1980.

One very important contribution to the game of football by Carolina is the modern use of the forward pass; they were the first college team to use the play in 1895. Bob Quincy notes in his 1973 book They Made the Bell Tower Chime:

"John Heisman, a noted historian, wrote 30 years later that, indeed, the Tar Heels had given birth to the forward pass against the Bulldogs (UGA). It was conceived to break a scoreless deadlock and give UNC a 6–0 win. The Tar Heels were in a punting situation and a Georgia rush seemed destined to block the ball. The punter, with an impromptu dash to his right, tossed the ball and it was caught by George Stephens, who ran 70 yards for a touchdown."

The program has long been overshadowed by the school's powerhouse men's basketball team. While not a consistent football powerhouse, the Carolina football program has had intermittent success and has featured a number of great players, many of whom have gone on to prominence in the National Football League, including Lawrence Taylor, Charlie Justice, Chris Hanburger, Ken Willard, Don McCauley, William Fuller, Harris Barton, Jeff Saturday, Alge Crumpler, Willie Parker, Greg Ellis, Dré Bly, Julius Peppers and Hakeem Nicks.

Head football coaches of Conference USA
East Division
West Division

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