Buskirk Bridge

Buskirk Bridge is a wooden covered bridge and is the name of the hamlet in which it is located. It is in the town of Hoosick. The bridge, which crosses the Hoosic River is one of 29 historic covered bridges in New York State. The bridge takes its name from the nearby hamlet of the same name, which was named after the local Van Buskirk family.[3]

Town and Howe truss designs were patented by Ithiel Town in 1820 and William Howe in 1840, respectively.[2] The Buskirk Bridge a Howe truss design, and was built to replace a previous Burr arch truss. It is perhaps the earliest Howe truss bridge that survives in New York State.[4]

A topographic map of its location appears in its individual inventory document prepared by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 1977.[5]

It is one of four Washington County covered bridges submitted for listing in the National Register of Historic Places in a multiple property submission.[2] The others are the Rexleigh Bridge, the Eagleville Bridge, and Shushan Bridge. All four were listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 8, 1972.[1]

The bridge continues in use for vehicles, and is maintained jointly by Washington County and Rensselaer County.[2]

Buskirk Covered Bridge
Buskirk Covered Bridge 001
Buskirk Bridge from the Rensselaer County side of the Hoosic River
Buskirk Bridge is located in New York
Buskirk Bridge
Buskirk Bridge is located in the United States
Buskirk Bridge
Nearest cityBuskirk, New York
Coordinates42°57′30″N 73°26′0″W / 42.95833°N 73.43333°WCoordinates: 42°57′30″N 73°26′0″W / 42.95833°N 73.43333°W
Area1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built1850
Architectural styleHowe truss
MPSCovered Bridges of Washington County TR / Buskirk, Rexleigh, Eagleville, and Shushan Covered Bridges[2]
NRHP reference #78003457[1]
Added to NRHPMarch 08, 1978

References

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  2. ^ a b c d Raymond W. Smith (December 1977). "Covered Bridges of Washington County TR / Buskirk, Rexleigh, Eagleville, and Shushan Covered Bridges". National Park Service. Retrieved 2010-06-12.
  3. ^ University of the State of New York Bulletin. University of the State of New York. 1914. p. 51.
  4. ^ The MPS document at one point seems to contradict itself, saying the "Town truss type is represented...by the bridges at Buskirk and at Rexleigh" and also it "is the earliest Howe truss bridge surviving in New York State" (page 3), but elsewhere it is clear that the Buskirk and Rexleigh bridges are both of the Howe truss design.
  5. ^ Smith, R.W. (October 1977). "Building/Structure Inventory: Rexleigh Covered Bridge". Division of Historic Preservation, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2008-02-08.

External links

Cambridge, New York

Cambridge is a town in Washington County, New York, United States. It is part of the Glens Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area. The town population was 2,152 at the 2000 census.The town of Cambridge contains part of a village, also called Cambridge.

Cohoes Falls

Cohoes Falls [Kahon:ios, Mohawk for "Canoe Falls"] is a waterfall on the Mohawk River shared by the city of Cohoes and the town of Waterford, New York, United States. Discovered by the indigenous people, the falls were called Ga-ha-oose or Ga-ho'n'-yoos by the Mohawks, which is believed to mean "The Place of the Falling Canoe." Cohoes historian Arthur Masten wrote in his 1880 history that the phrase might mean "Potholes in the River," referring to the potholes that appear in the riverbed when it is dry. In the oral tradition of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), the Cohoes Falls are the site where The Great Peacemaker, performed a feat of supernatural strength, convincing the Mohawk people to become the founders of the Iroquois League of Nations or Confederacy. Some historians believe the Mohawks launched the Confederacy as early as 1142 CE, though other experts report dates ranging from 1450-1650.

Celebrated by 18th-century travelers in letters and journals, the Cohoes Falls, also called The Great Falls of the Mohawk, were regarded as the second-most beautiful cataract in New York State after Niagara. In 1804, the national poet of Ireland, Thomas Moore, visited Cohoes and wrote a paean to the waterfall's beauty: "Lines Written at the Cohos, or Falls of the Mohawk River."

In 1831, town leaders built a dam across the Mohawk River to harness the power of the falls to fuel the turbines of the city's burgeoning textile industry. Over the next several decades, the predominant company, Harmony Mills, became the largest manufacturer of cotton in the United States, thanks to its control of local water rights. When all the mills closed in the wake of the Great Depression, city leaders neglected the potential of the falls for tourism. They leased the flow rights to a series of power companies, including Niagara Mohawk and Orion Power.

The Erie Canal was planned to overcome the navigational barrier of the Cohoes Falls. The original "Clinton's Ditch", the Erie Canal of 1825, was built through the city of Cohoes. The later Enlarged Canal was realigned, yet still went through the City of Cohoes. The Barge Canal, which opened in 1918, bypasses Cohoes and runs though the Village of Waterford via the Waterford Flight of Locks.

The Cohoes Falls is 90 feet (28 m) high and 1,000 feet (305 m) wide. Its flow is most impressive in springtime, sometimes running at 90,000 cubic feet (2,500 m3) of water per second, but as the season changes, there is less water for the falls because so much of the flow is diverted at the Crescent Dam to the Barge Canal through Lock 6. Most of the water is still diverted for power generation; some is diverted for the Cohoes water supply. During the summer, the falls are virtually dry, revealing shale rock formations that have their own distinctive beauty. The 87-year average flow of the Mohawk River at Cohoes is 34,638 cubic feet per second, but this includes water diverted to the power plant and Erie Canal locks.

Eagleville Bridge

Eagleville Bridge is a covered bridge located at Eagleville in the towns of Jackson and Salem, Washington County, New York. The bridge, which crosses the Battenkill, is one of 29 historic covered bridges in New York State.

It was built by local builder Ephraim Clapp in 1858.Town and Howe truss designs were patented by Ithiel Town in 1820 and William Howe (architect) in 1840, respectively. The Eagleville Bridge employs "the patented Town lattice truss, consisting of top and bottom chords of laminated wood plank, and a web of diagonal wood planks connected by wood trunnels at each point of intersection".It is one of four Washington County covered bridges submitted for listing in the National Register of Historic Places in one multiple property submission. The others are the Buskirk Bridge, the Rexleigh Bridge, and Shushan Bridge. All four were listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 8, 1972.The Eagleville bridge was damaged by a flood in 1977 but was "stabilized and returned to vehicular use".

East River

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City. The waterway, which is actually not a river despite its name, connects Upper New York Bay on its south end to Long Island Sound on its north end. It separates the borough of Queens on Long Island from the Bronx on the North American mainland, and also divides Manhattan from Queens and Brooklyn, which are also on Long Island. Because of its connection to Long Island Sound, it was once also known as the Sound River. The tidal strait changes its direction of flow frequently, and is subject to strong fluctuations in its current, which are accentuated by its narrowness and variety of depths. The waterway is navigable for its entire length of 16 miles (26 km), and was historically the center of maritime activities in the city, although that is no longer the case.

Hoosick, New York

Hoosick is a town in Rensselaer County, New York, United States. The population was 6,924 at the 2010 census. It was named from the Hoosic River.The Town of Hoosick is in the northeast corner of Rensselaer county.

List of New York State Historic Markers in Washington County, New York

This is an incomplete list of New York State Historic Markers in Washington County, New York.

List of covered bridges in New York

This is a list of covered bridges in New York State.

The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation identifies 29 covered bridges in New York State as historic, but these are not all listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The New York Society of Covered Bridges lists 24 historic covered bridges.One of the NRHPs, Old Blenheim Bridge, has further been declared to be a National Historic Landmark and also has described by a Historic American Engineering Record. It may be the longest single-span covered bridge in the United States or in the world.

Rexleigh Bridge

Rexleigh Bridge is a wooden covered bridge over the Batten Kill in Washington County, New York. It is one of 29 historic covered bridges in New York State.

Town and Howe truss designs were patented by Ithiel Town in 1820 and William Howe (architect) in 1840, respectively. The Rexleigh Bridge employs "the patented Howe truss, with paired diagonal timbers, single timber counters, and multiple vertical iron rods defining each truss panel. The diagonals and verticals are connected to the upper and lower chords by means of cast-iron bearing blocks." Those bearing blocks are "embossed with the name of their manufacturer, 'R. Comins, Troy, N.Y.,'" and, although the timber used is local, the bridge "appears to be a rare surviving example of this type of prefabricated nineteenth-century bridge construction."It was individually inventoried by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 1977.It is one of four Washington County covered bridges submitted for listing in the National Register of Historic Places in one multiple property submission. The others are the Buskirk Bridge, the Eagleville Bridge, and Shushan Bridge. All four were listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 8, 1972.

Shushan Bridge

Shushan Bridge is a covered bridge over the Batten Kill in the hamlet of Shushan in Washington County, New York, near Vermont. It is one of 29 surviving historic covered bridges in New York State, and one of 4 surviving in Washington County.

It was built in 1858 by builder Milton Stevens.

Town and Howe truss designs were patented by Ithiel Town in 1820 and William Howe in 1840, respectively. The Shushan Bridge employs "the patented Town lattice truss, consisting of top and bottom chords of laminated wood plank, and a web of diagonal wood planks connected by wood trunnels at each point of intersection".It was individually inventoried by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 1977.It is one of four Washington County covered bridges submitted for listing in the National Register of Historic Places in one multiple property submission. The others are the Buskirk Bridge, the Rexleigh Bridge, and Eagleville Bridge. All four were listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 8, 1972.The Shushan bridge was closed to traffic in 1962, and was left abandoned for 10 years, then saved by local preservation efforts. Now it is operated as a seasonal museum.

The Palisades (Hudson River)

The Palisades, also called the New Jersey Palisades or the Hudson River Palisades, are a line of steep cliffs along the west side of the lower Hudson River in Northeastern New Jersey and Southeastern New York in the United States. The cliffs stretch north from Jersey City about 20 miles (32 km) to near Nyack, New York, and visible at Haverstraw, New York. They rise nearly vertically from near the edge of the river, and are about 300 feet (90 m) high at Weehawken, increasing gradually to 540 feet (160 m) high near their northern terminus. North of Fort Lee, the Palisades are part of Palisades Interstate Park and are a National Natural Landmark.The Palisades are among the most dramatic geologic features in the vicinity of New York City, forming a canyon of the Hudson north of the George Washington Bridge, as well as providing a vista of the Manhattan skyline. They sit in the Newark Basin, a rift basin located mostly in New Jersey.

Palisade is derived from the same root as the word pale, ultimately from the Latin word palus, meaning stake. A "palisade" is, in general, a defensive fence or wall made up of wooden stakes or tree trunks. The Lenape called the cliffs "rocks that look like rows of trees", a phrase that became "Weehawken", the name of a town in New Jersey that sits at the top of the cliffs across from Midtown Manhattan.

Washington County, New York

Washington County is a county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 63,216. The county seat is Fort Edward. The county was named for U.S. President George Washington.

Washington County is part of the Glens Falls, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Albany-Schenectady, NY Combined Statistical Area.

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