Burdur Province

Burdur Province (Turkish: Burdur ili) is a province of Turkey, located in the southwest and bordering Muğla and Antalya to the south, Denizli to the west, Afyon to the north, and Isparta to the east. It has an area of 6,887 km2 and a population of 258,868. The provincial capital is Burdur city.

Burdur is located in the Lakes Region of Turkey and has many lakes of various sizes, the largest of which, Burdur Lake, is named after the province. Salda Lake is the second largest lake in the province and is considered to be one of the cleanest lakes in the world.

Burdur Province

Burdur ili
Location of Burdur Province in Turkey
Location of Burdur Province in Turkey
CountryTurkey
RegionMediterranean
SubregionAntalya
Government
 • Electoral districtBurdur
Area
 • Total6,887 km2 (2,659 sq mi)
Population
 (2018)[1]
 • Total269,926
 • Density39/km2 (100/sq mi)
Area code(s)0248
Vehicle registration15

Districts

Burdur province is divided into 11 districts (capital district in bold):

Gallery

Sagalassos1

Ancient city of Sagalassos

Museum of Anatolian Civilizations014

Artifacts retrieved from Hacilar neolithic site

See also

References

  1. ^ "Population of provinces by years - 2000-2018". Turkish Statistical Institute. Retrieved 9 March 2019.

External links

Coordinates: 37°25′26″N 30°05′04″E / 37.42389°N 30.08444°E

Bademli Dam

Bademli Dam is a dam in Burdur Province, Turkey, built between 1987 and 1997.

Balbura (Lycia)

Balbura or Balboura (Ancient Greek: Βάλβουρα) was a town of ancient Lycia, the site of which is at Çölkayiği. The acropolis hill is about 90 metres above the plain of Katara, and the plain is 1,500 feet (460 m) above the level of the sea. The ruins occupy a considerable space on both sides of the stream. There are two theatres at Balbura; one is on the south side of the acropolis hill, and the other is in a hollow in the front of the mountain on the south side of the stream: the hollow in the mountain formed the cavea. There are also remains of several temples at Katara; and of Christian churches. The ethnic name Βαλβουρεύς occurs on two inscriptions at least at Katara. The site was discovered by Hoskyn and Forbes. Balbura was part of a district called Cabalia, named Cabalis by Strabo with two other cities, Bubon and Oenoanda.

Balbura minted coins during the Hellenistic Age and during the reign of Caligula.

Bubon (Lycia)

Bubon or Boubon (Ancient Greek: Βούβων) was a city of ancient Lycia noted by Stephanus of Byzantium; the ethnic name, he adds, ought to be Βουβώνιος, but it is Βουβωνεύς, for the Lycians rejoice in this form. The truth of this observation of Stephanus is proved by the inscription found on the spot: Βουβωνέων ἡ Βουλὴ καὶ ὁ Δῆμος. Bubon is placed in the map in Spratt's Lycia, near 37° N. lat. west of Balbura, near a place named Ibecik, which location is confirmed by modern scholars. Bubon is mentioned by Pliny, Ptolemy, and Hierocles. Pliny mentions a kind of chalk (creta) that was found about Bubon. The city stood on a hill side. The ruins are not striking. There is a small theatre built of sandstone, and on the summit of the hill was the acropolis. Bubon is in a mountainous tract and it commands the entrance to the pass over the mountains. Bubon, along with Balbura and Oenoanda formed the district Cabalia.

Ceretapa

Ceretapa or Keretapa (Ancient Greek: τὰ Κερέταπα), also called Diocaesarea or Diocaesareia or Diokaisareia (Διοκαισάρεια), was a Graeco-Roman town of Phrygia Pacatiana. It minted coins bearing the demonym Κερεταπεύς. The coins also show that there was near it a river or fountain Aulindenus. It was a bishopric; no longer the seat a residential bishop, it remains a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.Its site is tentatively located near Kayadibi in Asiatic Turkey.

Cretopolis

Cretopolis or Kretopolis (Ancient Greek: Κρητόπολις or Κρητῶν πόλις) was a town of ancient Pisidia, Lycia, or Pamphylia, according to various ancient writers. Historians of the Wars of the Diadochi, such as Diodorus, place it in Pisidia. Ptolemy places Cretopolis in the part of Cabalia, which he attaches to Pamphylia. Polybius places it in the Milyas, Lycia. The site is unknown. The Battle of Cretopolis was fought nearby in 319 BCE.

Its site is located at Buğdüz, near Yüreğil in Asiatic Turkey.

Hacilar

Hacilar is an early human settlement in southwestern Turkey, 23 km south of present-day Burdur. It has been dated back 7040 BC at its earliest stage of development. Archaeological remains indicate that the site was abandoned and reoccupied on more than one occasion in its history.

Hadrianopolis (Pisidia)

Hadrianopolis or Hadrianoupolis (Ancient Greek: Ἁδριανούπολις), also known as Hadriani, was a town in ancient Pisidia.Its site is located near Eğnes in Asiatic Turkey.

Hyia

Hyia was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Hellenistic and Roman times. Its name does not occur among ancient authors, but is inferred from epigraphic and other evidence.Its site is located at İncirli, near Eskiköy, in Asiatic Turkey.

Keraia (Pisidia)

Keraia was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Hellenistic and Roman times. Its name does not occur among ancient authors, but is inferred from epigraphic and other evidence.Its site is located near Çere, Belören, in Asiatic Turkey.

Kodroula

Kodroula was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine times.Its site is located near Kaynar Kale, in Asiatic Turkey.

Kolbasa

Kolbasa was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine times.Its site is located near Kuşbaba, in Asiatic Turkey.

Legeita

Legeita was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Roman times. Its name does not occur in ancient authors, but is inferred from epigraphic and other evidence.Its site is located near Çine, in Asiatic Turkey.

Magastara

Magastara was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Roman times. Its name does not occur in ancient authors, but is inferred from epigraphic and other evidence.Its site is tentatively located near Lengüme, in Asiatic Turkey.

Moatra

Moatra was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Roman times.Its site is located near Bereket, in Asiatic Turkey.

Mylios

Mylios was an inland town of ancient Pisidia, inhabited during Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine times.Its site is located near Asar, in Asiatic Turkey. Archaeologists have found the remains of a theatre there.

Panemoteichos

Panemoteichos was an inland town of ancient Pamphylia or of Pisidia inhabited during Roman and Byzantine times.Its site is located near of Boğazköy, in Asiatic Turkey. Archaeologists have revealed Iron Age remains there.

Perminounda

Perminounda was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Roman times. Its name does not occur among ancient authors, but is inferred from epigraphic and other evidence.Its site is tentatively located near Kızılcaağaç, in Asiatic Turkey.

Sagalassos

Sagalassos (Greek: Σαγαλασσός) is an archaeological site in southwestern Turkey, about 100 km north of Antalya (ancient Attaleia), and 30 km from Burdur and Isparta. The ancient ruins of Sagalassos are 7 km from Ağlasun (as well as being its namesake) in the province of Burdur, on Mount Akdağ, in the Western Taurus mountains range, at an altitude of 1450–1700 metres.

In Roman Imperial times, the town was known as the "first city of Pisidia", a region in the western Taurus mountains, currently known as the Turkish Lakes Region. During the Hellenistic period it was already one of the major Pisidian towns.

Sia (Pisidia)

Sia was a town of ancient Pisidia inhabited during Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine times.Its site is located near Karaot, in Asiatic Turkey.

Burdur Province of Turkey
Districts

Languages

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