Build (developer conference)

Microsoft Build (often stylised as //build/) is an annual conference event held by Microsoft, aimed towards software engineers and web developers using Windows, Windows Phone, Microsoft Azure and other Microsoft technologies. First held in 2011, it serves as a successor for Microsoft's previous developer events, the Professional Developers Conference (an infrequent event which covered development of software for the Windows operating system) and MIX (which covered web development centering on Microsoft technology such as Silverlight and ASP.net). The attendee price was (US)$2,195 in 2016, up from $2,095 in 2015. It has sold out quickly, within one minute of the registration site opening in 2016.[1]

Microsoft Build Developers Conference
Microsoft BUILD Conf logo
FrequencyAnnual
VenueAnaheim Convention Center, Microsoft Campus, Moscone Center, Washington State Convention Center
Location(s)Anaheim, California, Redmond, Washington, San Francisco, California, Seattle, Washington
FoundedSeptember 2011
Most recentMay 6–8, 2019
Next eventMay 4–6, 2020
Participants15,000
Organized byMicrosoft
Websitewww.microsoft.com/en-us/build
Build 2013 sign
Sign for Microsoft's Build 2013 conference at the Moscone Center entrance in San Francisco

Format

The event has been held at a large convention center, or purpose-built meeting space on the Microsoft Campus. The Keynote on the first day has been led by the Microsoft CEO addressing the press and developers. It has been the place to announce the general technology milestones for developers. There are breakout sessions conducted by engineers and program managers, most often Microsoft employees representing their particular initiatives. The keynote on the second day often includes deeper dives into technology. Thousands of developers and technologists from all over the world attend.

Events

2011

Build 2011 was held from September 13 to September 16, 2011 in Anaheim, California.[2] The conference heavily focused on Windows 8, Windows Server 2012 and Visual Studio 2012; their Developer Preview versions were also released during the conference. Attendees also received a Samsung tablet shipping with the Windows 8 "Developer Preview" build.[3]

2012

Held on Microsoft's campus in Redmond from October 30 to November 2, 2012, the 2012 edition of Build focused on the recently released Windows 8, along with Windows Azure and Windows Phone 8. Attendees received a Surface RT tablet with Touch Cover, a Nokia Lumia 920 smartphone, and 100GB of free SkyDrive storage.[4]

2013

Build 2013 was held from June 26 to June 28, 2013 at the Moscone Center (North and South) in San Francisco.[5] The conference was primarily used to unveil the Windows 8.1 update for Windows 8.[6][7] Each attendee received a Surface Pro, Acer Iconia W3 (the first 8-inch Windows 8 tablet) with a Bluetooth keyboard, one year of Adobe Creative Cloud and 100GB of free SkyDrive storage.[8]

2014

Build 2014 was held at the Moscone Center (West) in San Francisco from April 2 to April 4, 2014. The date and venue of Build 2014 were prematurely published by Microsoft's website on December 12, 2013, but was subsequently pulled. Microsoft ultimately made an official announcement on the next day.[9][10] Build attendees received a free Xbox One and a $500 Microsoft Store gift card.[11]

Highlights:

2015

Build 2015 was held at the Moscone Center (West) in San Francisco from April 29 to May 1, 2015. Registration fee is $2095, and opened at 9:00am PST on Thursday, January 22 and "sold out" in under an hour[12][13] with an unspecified number of attendees. Build attendees received a free HP Spectre x360 ultrabook.[14]

Highlights:

2016

Build 2016 was held at the Moscone Center in San Francisco from March 30 to April 1, 2016. The price was $2195, an increase of $100 compared to the previous year. The conference was sold out in 1 minute.[1] Unlike previous years, there were no hardware gifts for attendees.[16]

Highlights:

2017

The 2017 Build conference took place at the Washington State Convention Center in Downtown Seattle, Washington from May 10 to May 12, 2017. It had been at Moscone Center for the previous four years. However, Moscone center was undergoing renovations from April through August 2017.[19] The Seattle location brought the conference close to the Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Washington. The price remained at $2195 for the 2017 conference. There were no devices given away at this conference to attendees.

Highlights:

  • Azure Cosmos DB
  • Visual Studio for Mac
  • WSL: Fedora and SUSE support
  • Xamarin Live Player
  • Windows 10 Fall Creators Update
  • Microsoft Fluent Design System

2018

The 2018 Build conference took place at the Washington State Convention Center in Downtown Seattle, Washington May 7 to May 9, 2018. The price has increased $300 to $2495 for the 2018 conference. The conference was preceded by the Windows Developer Awards 2018 ceremony.

Highlights:

  • .Net
    • .Net Core 3
    • ML.Net
  • Azure
    • Azure CDN
    • Azure Confidential Computing
    • Azure Database Migration Service
    • Azure Maps
  • Microsoft 365
  • Microsoft Store: increased developer revenue share (95%; Non-Game App via deeplink only)
  • Visual Studio
    • App Center
    • IntelliCode
    • Live Share
  • Windows 10 Redstone 5
    • Cloud Clipboard
    • NotePad: Unix/Linux EOL support
  • Xamarin
    • Hyper-V Android Emulator
    • Automatic iOS Device Provisioning
    • Xamarin.Essentials
    • Xamarin.Forms 3.0

2019

The 2019 Build conference will take place at the Washington State Convention Center in Downtown Seattle, Washington from May 6 to May 8, 2019 plus optional post-event learning activities on next two days. The price has decreased $100 to $2395 for the 2019 conference. Registration started on February 27.

Attendee Party Venues

  • 2011: The Grove
  • 2012: Seattle Armory
  • 2013: Pier 48
  • 2014: AMC Metreon
  • 2015: AMC Metreon
  • 2016: Block Party Yerba Ln
  • 2017: CentryLink Field
  • 2018: Museum of Pop Culture / Chihuly Garden and Glass
  • 2019: CentryLink Field

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Warren, Tom (January 19, 2016). "Microsoft's Build conference sold out in one minute". The Verge. Archived from the original on March 31, 2016.
  2. ^ "BUILD2011 Channel 9". Retrieved 7 February 2018.
  3. ^ Patel, Nilay (September 13, 2011). "Samsung tablets running Windows 8 Developer Preview given out at Build". The Verge. Archived from the original on May 30, 2013. Retrieved 7 February 2018.
  4. ^ D., Pravesh (October 31, 2012). "BUILD Attendees Get Surface RT tablet, Lumia 920 and 100GB Free SkyDrive Storage". TechSnapr. Archived from the original on May 20, 2017.
  5. ^ Meisner, Jeffrey (March 26, 2013). "Announcing Build 2013". Microsoft. Archived from the original on August 31, 2016. Retrieved 26 March 2013.
  6. ^ Chacos, Brad (March 26, 2013). "Microsoft officially acknowledges Windows Blue". PC World. Archived from the original on September 28, 2018. Retrieved 29 March 2013.
  7. ^ LeBlanc, Brandon (May 14, 2013). "Windows Keeps Getting Better". Microsoft. Archived from the original on July 31, 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2013.
  8. ^ Weir, Andy (June 26, 2013). "BUILD 2013: Attendees get 8-in Acer Iconia W3 tablet [Update: ...and a Surface Pro!]". Neowin. Archived from the original on February 3, 2016. Retrieved 26 June 2013.
  9. ^ Guggenheimer, Steve (December 13, 2013). "Mark your calendars: Announcing Build 2014". Microsoft. Archived from the original on January 27, 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  10. ^ Warren, Tom (December 12, 2013). "Microsoft schedules BUILD 2014 developer conference for April 2nd". The Verge. Archived from the original on December 13, 2013. Retrieved 13 December 2013.
  11. ^ Protalinski, Emil (April 2, 2014). "Microsoft treats Build 2014 attendees to an Xbox One and a $500 Microsoft Store gift card". The Next Web. Archived from the original on August 17, 2016. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  12. ^ Callaham, John (October 16, 2014). "Microsoft announces BUILD 2015 for April 29-May 1, kicks off new Ignite enterprise conference". Windows Central. Archived from the original on December 28, 2018. Retrieved October 16, 2014.
  13. ^ Lowensohn, Josh (January 22, 2015). "Microsoft's Build conference sold out in one hour". The Verge. Archived from the original on January 13, 2017. Retrieved January 22, 2015.
  14. ^ Fried, Ina (April 29, 2015). "Microsoft Makes Its Case to Developers at Build Conference in San Francisco (Liveblog)". Recode. Archived from the original on June 20, 2016. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  15. ^ "Get ready for Microsoft HoloLens at Build, Microsoft's premier developer conference". Archived from the original on April 29, 2015. Retrieved 13 February 2015.
  16. ^ Weinberger, Matt (January 19, 2016). "Microsoft's big conference for programmers sold out in five minutes, despite no free laptop giveaways". Business Insider. Archived from the original on February 8, 2017. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
  17. ^ Friedman, Nat (31 March 2016). "Xamarin for Everyone". Xamarin Blog. Archived from the original on April 12, 2016.
  18. ^ "Remoted iOS Simulator (for Windows)". Xamarin Developer Guides. November 13, 2018.
  19. ^ Moscone Expansion FAQ retrieved June 2017 -Moscone North and South will be closed April–August 2017. Moscone West will remain open and is fully booked.

External links

Apple Worldwide Developers Conference

The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is a conference held annually by Apple Inc. in San Jose, California. Apple uses the event to showcase its new software and technologies for software developers. Attendees can participate in hands-on labs with Apple engineers and attend in-depth sessions covering a wide variety of topics.

WWDC began in 1987 in Santa Clara. After 15 years in nearby San Jose, the conference moved to San Francisco, where it eventually became Apple's primary media event of the year and regularly sold out. WWDC returned to San Jose 13 years later.

Build

Build may refer to:

Engineering something

Construction

Physical body stature, especially [muscle size; usually of the human body

Build engine, a first-person shooter engine by 3D Realms

Software build, a compiled version of software, or the process of producing it

"Build" (song), a 1987 song by The Housemartins

Build (developer conference), a Microsoft developer conference

Build (design conference), a web design conference which took place in Belfast, Northern Ireland between 2009–2013

Cortana

Cortana is a virtual assistant created by Microsoft for Windows 10, Windows 10 Mobile, Windows Phone 8.1, Invoke smart speaker, Microsoft Band, Surface Headphones, Xbox One, iOS, Android, Windows Mixed Reality, and Amazon Alexa.Cortana can set reminders, recognize natural voice without the requirement for keyboard input, and answer questions using information from the Bing search engine.

Cortana is currently available in English, Portuguese, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese language editions, depending on the software platform and region in which it is used.

ML.NET

ML.NET is a free software machine learning library for the C#, F# and VB.NET programming languages. It also supports Python models when used together with NimbusML. The preview release of ML.NET included transforms for feature engineering like n-gram creation, and learners to handle binary classification, multi-class classification, and regression tasks. Additional ML tasks like anomaly detection and recommendation systems have since been added, and other approaches like deep learning will be included in future versions.

Microsoft Store (digital)

Microsoft Store (formerly known as Windows Store) is a digital distribution platform sponsored by Microsoft. It started as an app store for Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 as the primary means of distributing Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps. With Windows 10, Microsoft merged its other distribution platforms (Windows Marketplace, Windows Phone Store, Xbox Video and Xbox Music and eventually Xbox Store) into Microsoft Store, making it a unified distribution point for apps, digital videos, digital music, console games, and e-books (until category removal in 2019).As of 2015, there were over 669,000 apps available on the store. Categories containing the largest number of apps are "Games", "Entertainment", "Books and Reference", and "Education". The majority of the app developers have one app.

As with other similar platforms, such as the Mac App Store and Google Play, Microsoft Store is curated and apps must be certified for compatibility and content. In addition to the user-facing Microsoft Store client, the store also has a developer portal with which developers can interact. Microsoft takes 30% of the sale price for apps. Prior to January 1, 2015, this cut was reduced to 20% after the developer's profits reached $25,000.

Starship Commander

Starship Commander a cinematic VR experience which allows players to have natural language conversations with the Non-player characters in the story. Developed by Human Interact, a Champaign, Illinois based company, Starship Commander was announced on February 7, 2017 in conjunction with Microsoft.

TypeScript

TypeScript is an open-source programming language developed and maintained by Microsoft. It is a strict syntactical superset of JavaScript, and adds optional static typing to the language.

TypeScript is designed for development of large applications and transcompiles to JavaScript. As TypeScript is a superset of JavaScript, existing JavaScript programs are also valid TypeScript programs. TypeScript may be used to develop JavaScript applications for both client-side and server-side (Node.js) execution.

There are multiple options available for transcompilation. Either the default TypeScript Checker can be used, or the Babel compiler can be invoked to convert TypeScript to JavaScript.TypeScript supports definition files that can contain type information of existing JavaScript libraries, much like C++ header files can describe the structure of existing object files. This enables other programs to use the values defined in the files as if they were statically typed TypeScript entities. There are third-party header files for popular libraries such as jQuery, MongoDB, and D3.js. TypeScript headers for the Node.js basic modules are also available, allowing development of Node.js programs within TypeScript.The TypeScript compiler is itself written in TypeScript and compiled to JavaScript. It is licensed under the Apache 2.0 License.

TypeScript is included as a first-class programming language in Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 and later, beside C# and other Microsoft languages. An official extension allows Visual Studio 2012 to support TypeScript as well.Anders Hejlsberg, lead architect of C# and creator of Delphi and Turbo Pascal, has worked on the development of TypeScript.

Washington State Convention Center

The Washington State Convention Center (WSCC) is a convention center in Seattle, Washington, United States. It consists of several exhibition halls and meeting rooms in buildings along Pike Street in Downtown Seattle. Part of the complex straddles Interstate 5 and connects with Freeway Park. The convention center was planned in the late 1970s and funded through $90 million in bonds issued by the state legislature.

Construction began in September 1985 after delays in securing private funding, and the complex opened on June 18, 1988. A major expansion began in 1999 and was completed in 2001, doubling the amount of exhibition space. A hotel and office tower were added, along with connections to the existing facility via a skybridge over Pike Street. At the site of the Convention Place transit station, located block north of the original convention center, a second major expansion has been under construction since 2018 and is expected to open in 2022.

The convention center's largest annual events include PAX West (formerly the Penny Arcade Expo), Emerald City Comic Con, Sakura-Con, and the Northwest Flower and Garden Show. It has approximately 415,000 square feet (38,600 m2) of usable space, including two exhibition halls with a combined 237,000 square feet (22,000 m2). The convention center is located near several hotels and a major retailing center, as well as the Westlake transit station and a public parking garage.

WinJS

The Windows Library for JavaScript (abbreviated as WinJS) is an open-source JavaScript library developed by Microsoft. It has been designed with the primary goal of easing development of Windows Store apps for Windows 8 and Windows 10, as well as Windows Phone apps for Windows Phone 8.1, Windows 10 Mobile and Xbox One applications using HTML5 and JavaScript, as an alternative to using XAML and C#, VB.NET or C++ (CX).

WinJS started as a technology that was specific to Windows Store apps, but has evolved to aim at working in any Web browser.

In April 2014, during the Microsoft Build developer conference, WinJS was released under the Apache License as free and open source software with the intent to port it to other than Microsoft platforms. A site dedicated to demonstrate the library has also been published. Future development is focused on maintaining what currently exists in the project. There are no plans for new features or feature requests, meaning there are no plans for a new feature release.

Xsolla

Xsolla is a video games industry company, providing game developers and publishers with payment, billing, distribution, and marketing tools.

Xsolla is headquartered in Sherman Oaks, Los Angeles, California. It has offices in Moscow and Perm in Russia, Kiev in Ukraine and Seoul in South Korea. Companies that use the service include Valve, Twitch.tv, Epic Games, Aeria Games, BigPoint Games, Gameforge, Ankama Games, Gaijin Entertainment, Goodgame Studios, Snail Games, and Roblox Corporation.

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