Buddy cop film

A buddy cop film is a film with plots involving two people of very different and conflicting personalities who are forced to work together to solve a crime and/or defeat criminals, sometimes learning from each other in the process. The two are normally either police officers (cops) or secret agents, but some films that are not about two officers may still be referred to as buddy cop films. It is a subgenre of buddy films. They can be either comedies or thrillers.

Frequently, although not always, the two heroes are of different ethnicity or cultures. However, regardless of ethnicity, the central difference is normally that one is "wilder" than the other: a hot-tempered iconoclast is paired with a more even-tempered partner. Often the "wilder" partner is the younger of the two, with the even-tempered partner having more patience and experience. These films sometimes also contain a variation on the good cop/bad cop motif, in which one partner is kinder and law-abiding, while the other is a streetwise, "old school" police officer who tends to break (or at least bend) the rules. Another frequent plot device of this genre is placing one of the partners in an unfamiliar setting (like a different city or foreign country) or role (like requiring police field work of a non-cop, rookie, or office-bound "desk jockey"). In these cases, they are usually guided by the other partner.

In his review of Rush Hour, Roger Ebert coined the term "Wunza Movie" to describe this subgenre, a pun on the phrase "One's a..." that could be used to describe the contrasts between the two characters in a typical film.[1]

The cliché was satirized in the film Last Action Hero. While the movie in itself was a buddy cop film (i.e. pairing a fictional cop with a real world boy), the film's police department obligatorily assigned all cops a conflicting buddy to work with, even to the extreme of one officer being partnered with a cartoon cat.

A subgenre of the buddy cop film is the buddy cop-dog movie, which teams a cop with a dog, but uses the same element of unlikely partnership to create comedic hijinks. Examples include Turner & Hooch, Top Dog and K-9.

History

Akira Kurosawa's 1949 Japanese film Stray Dog, starring Toshiro Mifune and Takashi Shimura, is considered a precursor to the buddy cop film genre.[2] Other early pioneers of the buddy cop film genre are the 1967 American film In the Heat of the Night and 1974's Freebie and the Bean. The genre was later popularized by the 1982 film 48 Hrs., starring Eddie Murphy and Nick Nolte, one of the most successful buddy cop films. 1987 saw the buddy cop genre reach its apex when Lethal Weapon made a theatrical debut. 1989 saw the release of Tango and Cash, starring Sylvester Stallone and Kurt Russell.

References

  1. ^ Ebert, Roger (September 18, 1998). "Rush Hour". rogerebert.com. Retrieved 2006-06-25.
  2. ^ "FilmInt". Film International. Sweden: Kulturrådet. 4 (1–6): 163. 2006. Retrieved 28 April 2012. In addition to being a masterful precursor to the buddy cop movies and police procedurals popular today, Stray Dog is also a complex genre film that examines the plight of soldiers returning home to post-war Japan.

External links

Alien Nation (film)

Alien Nation is a 1988 American buddy cop neo-noir science fiction action film directed by Graham Baker. The ensemble cast features James Caan, Mandy Patinkin and Terence Stamp. Its initial popularity inaugurated the beginning of the Alien Nation media franchise. The film depicts the assimilation of the "Newcomers", an alien race settling in Los Angeles, much to the initial dismay of the local population. The plot integrates the neo-noir and buddy cop film genres with a science fiction theme, centering on the relationship between a veteran police investigator (Caan) and an extraterrestrial (Patinkin); the first Newcomer detective. The duo probe a criminal underworld while attempting to solve a homicide.

The film was a co-production between American Entertainment Partners and 20th Century Fox, which distributed it theatrically. Alien Nation explores murder, discrimination and science fiction.

Alien Nation was released in the United States on October 7, 1988, and grossed over $32 million worldwide, becoming a moderate financial success. The film was met with mixed critical reviews before its theatrical release, although it has since gained a cult following. The motion picture spawned a short-lived television series, five television films, a set of comic books, as well as a number of novels, all in an attempt to continue the character development surrounding the fictional alien culture.

Bon Cop, Bad Cop

Bon Cop, Bad Cop is a 2006 Canadian dark comedy-thriller buddy cop film about two police officers – one Ontarian and one Québecois – who reluctantly join forces to solve a murder. The dialogue is a mixture of English and French. The title is a translation word play on the phrase "Good cop/bad cop".

A sequel, Bon Cop, Bad Cop 2, was filmed in 2016 and released in May 2017.

Buddy film

The buddy film is a film genre in which two (or on occasion, more than two) people—often both men—are put together. The two often contrast in personality, which creates a different dynamic onscreen than a pairing of two people of the opposite gender. The contrast is sometimes accentuated by an ethnic difference between the two. The buddy film is commonplace in American cinema; unlike some other film genres, it endured through the 20th century with different pairings and different themes.

CHiPs (film)

CHiPs is a 2017 American action comedy buddy cop film written and directed by Dax Shepard, based on the 1977–1983 television series of the same name created by Rick Rosner. The film stars Shepard as Officer Jon Baker and Michael Peña as Frank "Ponch" Poncherello, with Rosa Salazar, Adam Brody and Vincent D'Onofrio in supporting roles.

Principal photography began on October 21, 2015, in Los Angeles. The film was released on March 24, 2017, by Warner Bros. Pictures and grossed $26 million worldwide. It has a 17% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, which called it "only mildly arresting at best".

Unlike the original series, the movie was produced without the cooperation of the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and without a license to use CHP logos.

Conan Lee

Conan Lee Yuen-Ba 李元霸 born Lloyd Hutchinson, is an Asian-American film actor and martial artist.

Female buddy film

A female buddy film is a type of buddy film in which the main characters are females, and the film's events center on their situations. The cast may is often mainly female, depending on the plot. "The female buddy film is a recent trend in mainstream cinema. Thelma & Louise with its darker themes, remains one of the most notable female buddy films to date and had a similar popular impact as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid in the early 1990s. Similar films also paved the way for onscreen female friendships such as that between Evelyn Couch and Ninny Threadgoode in Fried Green Tomatoes. Other popular duos include those in Waiting to Exhale and Walking and Talking."Jonathan Rosenbaum has praised Jacques Rivette's 1974 film Céline and Julie Go Boating as an example of the genre and wrote that he knows "many women who consider Céline et Julie vont en bateau their favorite movie about female friendship." Dennis Lim sees the influence of Rivette's film in other female buddy films, such as Susan Seidelman's Desperately Seeking Susan and David Lynch's Mullholland Drive. It was also influential on and referenced in Erick Zonca's 1998 film The Dreamlife of Angels.The genre is crossed with the buddy cop film in the 2013 comedy The Heat, in which a brash police officer (Melissa McCarthy) is teamed with a straightlaced FBI agent (Sandra Bullock).

Freebie and the Bean

Freebie and the Bean is a 1974 American action-comedy film about two off-beat police detectives who wreak havoc in San Francisco attempting to bring down a local organized crime boss. The picture, a precursor to the buddy cop film genre popularized a decade later, stars James Caan, Alan Arkin, Loretta Swit and Valerie Harper. Harper was nominated for the Golden Globe for New Star of the Year for playing the Hispanic wife of Alan Arkin. The film was directed by Richard Rush. An article in Rolling Stone magazine alleged that Stanley Kubrick called Freebie and the Bean the best film of 1974. Arkin and Caan would not appear in another movie together until the 2008 film adaptation of Get Smart.

Jordan Carlos

Jordan Carlos is an American stand-up comedian who played a recurring character on The Colbert Report and is a co-host on the Nickelodeon kids' show Me TV. He also appeared as a panelist and reporter on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore.

List of Playboy Playmates of 1984

The following is a list of Playboy Playmates of 1984, the 30th anniversary year of the publication. Playboy magazine names their Playmate of the Month each month throughout the year.

List of awards and nominations received by Mel Gibson

This is a list of awards and nominations received by actor and filmmaker Mel Gibson. Gibson is best known as an action hero, for roles such as Martin Riggs in the Lethal Weapon buddy cop film series, and Max Rockatansky in the first three films in the Mad Max post-apocalyptic action series. He produced, directed, and starred in the epic historical drama film Braveheart, for which he won the Golden Globe Award and Academy Award for Best Director, along with the Academy Award for Best Picture. He later directed and produced the financially successful and controversial, biblical drama film The Passion of the Christ. He received further critical notice for his directorial work of the action-adventure film Apocalypto, which is set in Mesoamerica during the early 16th century. After a 10-year hiatus from directing, Gibson returned with the critically praised and financially successful Hacksaw Ridge, which won the Academy Awards for Best Sound Mixing and Best Film Editing and earned Gibson his second nomination for Best Director.

Mel Gibson

Mel Colmcille Gerard Gibson (born January 3, 1956) is an American actor and filmmaker. He is best known for his action hero roles, particularly his breakout role as Max Rockatansky in the first three films of the post-apocalyptic action series Mad Max and as Martin Riggs in the buddy cop film series Lethal Weapon.

Born in Peekskill, New York, Gibson moved with his parents to Sydney, Australia when he was 12 years old. He studied acting at the National Institute of Dramatic Art, where he starred opposite Judy Davis in a production of Romeo and Juliet. During the 1980s, he founded Icon Entertainment, a production company, which independent film director Atom Egoyan has called "an alternative to the studio system". Director Peter Weir cast him as one of the leads in the World War I drama Gallipoli (1981), which earned Gibson a Best Actor Award from the Australian Film Institute, as well as a reputation as a serious, versatile actor.

In 1995, Gibson produced, directed, and starred in Braveheart, a historical epic, for which he won the Golden Globe Award for Best Director, the Academy Award for Best Director, and the Academy Award for Best Picture. He later directed and produced The Passion of the Christ, a biblical drama that was both financially successful and highly controversial. He received further critical notice for his directorial work of the action-adventure film Apocalypto (2006), which is set in Mesoamerica during the early 16th century.

After several legal issues and controversial statements leaked to the public, Gibson's public image plummeted significantly, affecting his careers in acting and directing. His career began seeing resurgence with his performance in Jodie Foster's The Beaver (2011), and his directorial comeback after an absence of 10 years; Hacksaw Ridge (2016), which won two Academy Awards and was nominated for another four, including Best Picture and Best Director for Gibson, his second nomination in the category.

Miami Supercops

Miami Supercops, in Italian: Miami Supercops (I poliziotti dell'8ª strada), is a 1985 Italian comedy film starring the comedy team of Terence Hill and Bud Spencer. It was the last "buddy cop"-film by Hill/Spencer and their final non-Western film together.

Police Police

Police Police is a 2010 Telugu buddy cop film directed by Manmohan and produced by Chandu. The film stars Sriram, Prithviraj Sukumaran, Kamalinee Mukherjee and Sanjjanaa in the lead roles. The film has been dubbed in Tamil as Kutrappirivu. The story revolves around two police officers with different ideologies. The film was released on 9 April 2010.

Shanghai Noon

Shanghai Noon is a 2000 American-Hong Kong martial arts western comedy film starring Jackie Chan, Owen Wilson and Lucy Liu. The first in the Shanghai film series and marking the directorial debut of Tom Dey, Shanghai Noon was written by Alfred Gough and Miles Millar.

The film, set in Nevada and other parts of the American West in the 19th century, is a juxtaposition of a western with a kung fu action film with extended martial arts sequences. It also has elements of comedy and the "Buddy Cop" film genre, featuring two vastly different heroes (a Chinese imperial guard and a white Western outlaw) who team up to stop a crime. It was partially filmed in the Canadian Badlands, near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada, and also near Cochrane, Alberta. A sequel, Shanghai Knights, was released in 2003, with David Dobkin as director.

Stray Dog (film)

Stray Dog (野良犬, Nora inu) is a 1949 Japanese crime drama film noir directed by Akira Kurosawa and starring Toshiro Mifune and Takashi Shimura. It was Kurosawa's second film of 1949 produced by Film Art Association and released by Shintoho. It is also received as a detective movie (among the first of Japanese films in that genre) that explores the mood of Japan during its painful postwar recovery. The film is considered a precursor to the contemporary police procedural and buddy cop film genres.

Theodore Rex

Theodore Rex may refer to:

Theodore Rex (film), a 1995 buddy cop film starring Whoopi Goldberg

Theodore Rex (book), a 2001 biography of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt written by author Edmund Morris

War on Everyone

War on Everyone is a 2016 British black comedy buddy cop film written and directed by John Michael McDonagh. The film stars Alexander Skarsgård, Michael Peña, and Theo James. Set and filmed in Albuquerque, New Mexico, it was screened in the Panorama section of the 66th Berlin International Film Festival. The film was released in the United Kingdom and Ireland on 7 October 2016 through Icon Film Distribution.

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