Buddy Bell

David Gus Bell (born August 27, 1951) is an American former third baseman and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB) currently serving as vice president and senior advisor to the general manager for the Cincinnati Reds. After an 18-year career with four teams, most notably the Cleveland Indians, the Texas Rangers, and the Cincinnati Reds, he managed the Detroit Tigers, Colorado Rockies and Kansas City Royals for three seasons each and served as Vice President/Assistant General Manager for the Chicago White Sox. He was a five-time MLB All-Star and won six consecutive Rawlings Gold Glove Awards from 1979–84. He is the son of outfielder Gus Bell and the father of former third basemen Mike and David Bell, making them one of five families to have three generations play in the Major Leagues. When David was named Reds manager in October 2018, he and Buddy became the fourth father-son pair to serve as major league managers, joining George and Dick Sisler, Bob and Joel Skinner, and Bob and Aaron Boone.[1]

Buddy Bell
Buddy Bell - Cleveland Indians
Third baseman / Manager
Born: August 27, 1951 (age 67)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 15, 1972, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
June 17, 1989, for the Texas Rangers
MLB statistics
Batting average.279
Hits2,514
Home runs201
Runs batted in1,106
Managerial record519–724
Winning %.418
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Biography

Bell was born while his father was playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates. He was drafted in 1969 by the Indians and was regarded as a promising prospect from the beginning. He first appeared in the Major Leagues with the Indians in 1972, appearing mostly in the outfield as a rookie, but afterwards becoming a fixture at third base. Bell was a solid, but not overpowering, right-handed hitter on a mostly lackluster Indians team. He was named to the All-Star team in 1973.

After the 1978 season Bell was traded to the Texas Rangers in exchange for Toby Harrah – another solid, veteran third baseman. Bell enjoyed his best season with the Rangers in 1979, collecting 200 hits, 101 RBI, and his first Gold Glove Award. From 1979 through 1984, Bell won the gold glove for third base in The American League. He also won the silver slugger award in 1984. He finished in the top 10 in batting average in 1980 and 1984.

In fielding, Bell was spectacular and often played far off the third base line, taking many basehits from opposing batters. In Total zone runs (a defensive statistic) he is 9th all time (ahead of Willie Mays) and 2nd among all third baseman (behind Brooks Robinson). His Range factor (another defensive stat) is 5th all-time among 3rd baseman. He was in the top 10 in fielding pct. 10 times and finished first 3 times.

In the middle of the 1985 season, Bell was sent to the Cincinnati Reds, where his father had been a popular player in the 1950s. Buddy responded with two more solid years playing for second place teams under Pete Rose. In the 1988 season he began to fade, and was traded to the Houston Astros. Bell was released in December and returned with the Rangers before the 1989 season, in which he appeared sparingly. In an 18-year career, Bell posted a .279 batting average with 201 home runs and 1106 RBI in 2405 games. He won six Gold Gloves, and made five All-Star Game appearances.

Following retirement, Bell worked for several years as a coach for the Reds, and from 1994-95 for the Indians. He managed the Detroit Tigers from 1996–98. He then managed the Colorado Rockies from 2000 through part of 2002 when he was fired in April after a 6-16 start. As a manager both for Detroit and Colorado, Bell compiled a 184-277 record.

In November 2002, Bell returned to coaching for the Cleveland Indians. On May 31, 2005, the Kansas City Royals hired Bell as their manager, three weeks after Tony Peña resigned. Bell won his first four games as a manager, becoming only the second Royals manager (after Whitey Herzog) to do so and guiding the Royals to their first four-game winning streak since 2003.

Bell took a medical leave of absence from the team on September 20, 2006 after a lump was discovered on his tonsils. Bell had experienced difficulty swallowing in the previous weeks [2], and went to the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona following the advice of Royals medical staff. Bell's wife has battled tonsil cancer as well. On August 1, 2007, Bell announced that he would not be returning to the Royals bench at the conclusion of the 2007 season. Bell stated that his decision was his own, not based on pressure from the Royals front office, and that he wished to spend more time with his family.[2]

Managerial record

Team From To Regular season record
W L Win %
Detroit Tigers 1996 1998 184 277 .399
Colorado Rockies 2000 2002 161 185 .465
Kansas City Royals 2005 2007 174 262 .399
Total 519 724 .418
Reference:[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Former Mariner David Bell hired as manager of Reds". The Seattle Times. The Associated Press. 21 October 2018. Retrieved 22 October 2018.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "Buddy Bell". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved September 28, 2015.

External links

Preceded by
Cleveland Indians Infield Coach
19941995
Succeeded by
Toby Harrah
Preceded by
Jeff Datz
Cleveland Indians Bench Coach
20032005
Succeeded by
Robby Thompson
1969 Major League Baseball draft

The 1969 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1969 MLB season. The draft featured future Hall of Famers Bert Blyleven (pick 55) and Dave Winfield (pick 882).

1983 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1983 season involved the Rangers finishing third in the American League West with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses. The Rangers did break a Major League Baseball record for the most runs ever scored by one team during a single extra inning.

1984 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1984 season involved the Rangers' finishing 7th in the American League west, with a record of 69 wins and 92 losses.

1985 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1985 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. The Reds finished in second place, 5½ games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. This year, the Reds adopted an alternate uniform. Reds pitcher Tom Browning became the last 20th Century pitcher to win 20 games in his rookie year.

1985 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1985 season involved the Rangers finishing 7th in the American League west with a record of 62 wins and 99 losses.

1987 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1987 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. The Reds finished in 2nd place with a record of 84-78.

1988 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1988 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West.

2002 Colorado Rockies season

The Colorado Rockies' 2002 season was the tenth for the Rockies. They tried to win the National League West. Buddy Bell and Clint Hurdle were the managers, the latter replacing the former after the former was fired. They played home games at Coors Field. They finished with a record of 73-89, 4th in the NL West.

Brent Butler

Justin Brent Butler (born February 11, 1978) is a retired Major League Baseball utility infielder.

Drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 3rd round of the 1996 MLB amateur draft, Butler made his Major League Baseball debut with the Colorado Rockies on July 4, 2001, and appeared in his final game on June 19, 2003.

During his first season at the Major League level, Butler compiled a .244 batting average in limited playing time. The Rockies manager at the time, Buddy Bell, used Butler primarily off of the bench as Todd Walker served as the Rockies starting second baseman. After Walker's departure from the team at the end of the 2001 season, Butler saw his greatest amount of playing time. During the 2002 season, Butler served as the Rockies starting second baseman. However, after compiling only a .259 batting average with a .287 OBP, the Rockies signed Ronnie Belliard as their starting second baseman for the 2003 season, relegating Butler to a reserve role again.

Once the 2003 season concluded, the Rockies released Butler. Although Butler competed at the minor league level for the St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Braves, and Tampa Bay Rays, he never returned to the major leagues since his Rockies release.

Brent Mayne

Brent Danem Mayne (born April 19, 1968) is an American former professional baseball catcher. He played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1990 to 2004 for the Kansas City Royals, New York Mets, Oakland Athletics, San Francisco Giants, Colorado Rockies, Arizona Diamondbacks, and Los Angeles Dodgers.

Brent Mayne was a major league catcher from 1990 to 2004. He played most of his career with the Kansas City Royals but also spent time with the Mets, A's, Giants, Rockies, Diamondbacks, and Dodgers. He ranks 75th in the history of baseball with 1,143 pro games caught, and held the distinction of being the only catcher in the twentieth century to have won a game as a pitcher, until Cubs backup catcher John Baker won a game as a relief pitcher on July 29, 2014. An All-American in college, he was drafted in the first round (13th pick overall) and inducted into the Orange Coast College Hall of Fame in 2006. Through his career, the well traveled Mayne was an effective catcher and an excellent handler of pitchers. He blocked the plate well and had a strong arm. Mayne was a decent hitter with occasional power and compiled a career high .301 batting average in consecutive seasons (1999–2000). In retirement, Mayne has gone on to serve on the board of directors of the Braille Institute and the Center for Hope and Healing. He is also the author of a book titled "The Art of Catching" and creator of a website and blog www.brentmayne.com.

As a Royal, Mayne caught Bret Saberhagen's no-hitter on August 26, 1991.On August 22, 2000, the Colorado Rockies sent Mayne in as a relief pitcher in the 12th inning against the Atlanta Braves. Mayne, the Rockies' regular catcher, was unable to swing a bat due to a sprained left wrist and had missed the previous four games. Out of pitchers, manager Buddy Bell asked Mayne if he could pitch. Mayne, who later said he had never pitched at any level, responded, "Yeah, I can pitch." He pitched one inning, surrendering no runs with a fastball that topped out at 83 miles per hour. Colorado won the game in the bottom of the 12th inning when rookie Adam Melhuse, pinch-hitting for Mayne, singled with the bases loaded and two outs. Mayne thus became the first position player to be credited with a win since Rocky Colavito in 1968, and the last to do so until Wilson Valdez in 2011.

In a 15-year career, Mayne was a .263 hitter with 38 home runs and 403 RBI in 1279 games.

Dave Frost

Carl David Frost (born November 17, 1952) is an American former professional baseball player and a former Major League Baseball pitcher. The 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m), 235 lb (107 kg) right-hander was drafted by the Chicago White Sox in the 18th round of the 1974 Major League Baseball draft. During a five-year Major League career, Frost played for the White Sox (1978), California Angels (1978–1981), and Kansas City Royals (1982).

Frost made his MLB debut on September 11, 1977 against the California Angels at Anaheim Stadium. He turned in a quality start, pitching 6​1⁄3 innings and giving up just two earned runs. He struck out three, walked none, and received a no decision in the 5-4 White Sox loss. His first big league win came a week later in another great start against the Angels, this time at Comiskey Park. He went 7​2⁄3 innings, gave up three runs, and won 7–3.

He was traded to the Angels on December 5, 1977 in a six-player deal, and became a valuable addition to the Angel pitching staff. He split time between Salt Lake City (PCL) and the big leagues in 1978, and went 5–4 with a 2.58 earned run average in 11 games (ten starts) for the Angels. Next year would be even better.

Frost had his biggest year in 1979. He won 16, lost 10, and led Angel starters in ERA (3.57), winning percentage (.615), and innings pitched (239​1⁄3). California had an impressive group of starters that year, including Frost, Nolan Ryan, Don Aase, Jim Barr, Chris Knapp, and Frank Tanana. They ultimately won the American League West Division pennant that year with an 88–74 record.

Unfortunately, elbow problems severely limited Frost's effectiveness the remainder of his career. In the next three seasons (two with the Angels and one with the Kansas City Royals) he was a combined 11–22 with a 5.43 ERA.

Career totals for 99 games pitched include a 33-37 record, 84 games started, 16 complete games, 3 shutouts, 1 save, and 7 games finished. He allowed 251 earned runs in 550​2⁄3 innings pitched, giving him a lifetime ERA of 4.10.

Career highlights include:

A four-hit, no walk complete game shutout vs. the Oakland A's (July 3, 1979)

An eight-strikeout, no walk complete game win (10–1) vs. the Baltimore Orioles (July 7, 1979)

A ten-inning, four-hit complete game win (2–1) vs. the Minnesota Twins (April 16, 1980)

Held All-Stars Sal Bando, Buddy Bell, Mike Hargrove, Rickey Henderson, Roy Howell, Pat Kelly, Hal McRae, Willie Randolph, Jim Rice, and Roy Smalley to a .103 collective batting average (15-for-145)

Held Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson, Cal Ripken, Jr., and Robin Yount to a .167 collective batting average (3-for-18)

Threw the opening pitch at a Los Angeles Angels game on Monday, June 27, 2011.

David Bell (baseball)

David Michael Bell (born September 14, 1972) is an American baseball former third baseman and current manager for the Cincinnati Reds. During his 12-year MLB playing career, he appeared at all four infield positions and played for the Philadelphia Phillies, Seattle Mariners, St. Louis Cardinals, Cleveland Indians, San Francisco Giants and Milwaukee Brewers. He made his MLB debut for the Indians in 1995.

Since his playing career, Bell has served as manager of the Triple-A Louisville Bats and the former Double-A Carolina Mudcats in the Reds organization. The grandson of Gus Bell, son of Buddy Bell, and brother of Mike Bell, David Bell is a member of one of five families to have three generations play in the Major Leagues. In addition, David and Buddy are the fifth father-son pair to serve as major league managers, joining Connie Mack and Earle Mack, George and Dick Sisler, Bob and Joel Skinner, and Bob and Aaron Boone.

List of Colorado Rockies managers

The Colorado Rockies are members of Major League Baseball (MLB) and based in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies have had seven managers since their founding in 1993. The Rockies first manager was Don Baylor, who led the team for six seasons and qualified for the playoffs once. Former manager Clint Hurdle led the franchise in wins and losses; Hurdle led the Rockies to the playoffs in 2007 in which the franchise was defeated in the World Series.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at third base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007 and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Brooks Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves with the Baltimore Orioles, leading both the American League and all third basemen in awards won. Mike Schmidt is second in wins at third base; he won 10 with the Philadelphia Phillies and leads National League third basemen in Gold Gloves. Scott Rolen has the third-highest total, winning eight awards with the Phillies, the St. Louis Cardinals, and the Cincinnati Reds. Six-time winners at third base are Buddy Bell, Nolan Arenado, Eric Chavez, and Robin Ventura. Ken Boyer, Doug Rader, and Ron Santo have each won five Gold Gloves at third base, and four-time winners include Adrián Beltré, Gary Gaetti, and Matt Williams. Hall of Famers who have won a Gold Glove at the position include Robinson, Schmidt, Santo, Wade Boggs, and George Brett.The least errors committed in a third baseman's winning season is five, achieved by Boggs in 1995 and Chavez in 2006. Two National League winners have made six errors in a season to lead that league: Mike Lowell in 2005, and Schmidt in 1986. Chavez' fielding percentage of .987 in 2006 leads all winners; Lowell leads the National League with his .983 mark. Robinson leads all winners with 410 assists in 1974, and made the most putouts in the American League (174 in 1966). The most putouts by a winner was 187, made by Santo in 1967. Schmidt leads the National League in assists, with 396 in 1977. The most double plays turned in a season was 44 by Robinson in 1974; he turned at least 40 double plays during three of his winning seasons. The National League leader is Nolan Arenado with 42 in 2015Ken Boyer and Clete Boyer are the only pair of brothers to have won Gold Glove Awards at third base. Older brother Ken won five Gold Gloves in six years with the Cardinals (1958–1961, 1963), and Clete won in 1969 with the Atlanta Braves.

List of Kansas City Royals managers

The Kansas City Royals are a franchise based in Kansas City, Missouri. They are members of the Central division of Major League Baseball's American League. The Royals franchise was formed in 1969.

There have been 19 managers for the Royals. Joe Gordon became the first manager of the Kansas City Royals in 1969, serving for one season. Bob Lemon became the first manager who held the title of manager for the Royals for more than one season. Ned Yost has managed more games than any other Royals manager and as many seasons as Dick Howser and Tony Muser. Whitey Herzog, Jim Frey, Howser, and Ned Yost are the only managers to have led the Royals into the playoffs. Three Royals managers—Gordon, Lemon, and Herzog—have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame;In 1970, Gordon was replaced with Charlie Metro. The Royals made their first playoff appearance under Herzog. Four managers have led the Royals into the postseason. Dick Howser led the Royals to their first World Series Championship in 1985. Ned Yost led the Royals into two World Series appearances, in the 2014 World Series, and a Win in the 2015 World Series. Frey, led the Royals to One world series appearance in the 1980 World Series. The highest winning percentage of any manager who managed at least one season was Herzog, with a percentage of .574. The lowest percentage was Bob Schaefer in 2005, although he managed for only 17 games. The lowest percentage of a manager with at least one season with the Royals was Buddy Bell, the manager from 2005 through the 2007 season with a percentage of .399.

The highest win total for a Royals manager is held by Yost, who also holds the record for losses. Tony Peña became the first Royals manager to win the Manager of the Year award, in 2003. The current manager of the Royals is Ned Yost. He was hired on May 13, 2010 after Trey Hillman was fired.

Mike Bell (third baseman)

Michael John Bell (born December 7, 1974) is currently the Director of Player Development for the Arizona Diamondbacks, former coach for the Visalia Rawhide and the Yakima Bears, and former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds in the 2000 season. He is the brother of David Bell, son of Buddy Bell and grandson of Gus Bell.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

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