Buddhism in Argentina

Buddhism in Argentina has been practiced since the early 1980s.

Although Argentina is largely Catholic Christianity, Chinese immigrants established the first Chinese temple in 1986, and Korean immigrants founded their own temple. Since then many groups have been giving teachings, some of them rooted in the best known Sōtō tradition from Japan, but also in many Tibetan institutes for the practice of meditation (Mahamudra, Dzog Chen, Lam Rim).

The XIV Dalai Lama visited Buenos Aires twice. The first time was in 1991 or 1992.

Nowadays many branches have flourished and teach.

Many organizations have cooperated to bring the relics of the Buddha to Argentina. This event was supported by the Royal Embassy of Thailand in Buenos Aires.

Among scholars who contributed to the spreading of Buddhism in Argentina are Samuel Wolpin, whose books have opened a door to many students and the general public, and Carmen Dragonetti and Fernando Tola, who have been researching and studying Buddhism for many years, with their books translated to many languages.

Teachers who have visited the country include Pu Hsien, founder of the Tzon Kuan Temple, Mok Sunim, responsible for spreading of Korean Buddhism in the early twentyfirst century, Chogyal Namkhai Norbu, founder of the international Dzog Chen Community who transmitted Dzog Chen teachings here, and Lama Ngawang Sherab Dorje, who visited Argentina many times.

Local teachers include Augusto Alcalde (Diamond Sangha) the first Roshi in this country. Jorge Bustamante, Soto lineage. Alberto Pulisi (Upasaka). Gonzalo Barreiros (Dharma Teacher), and two Argentine lamas, Horacio and Consuelo.

See also

References

Outline of Argentina

The following outline is provided as an overview of, and introduction to Argentina:

Argentina – country in South America, the continent's second largest by land area, after Brazil. It is constituted as a federation of 23 provinces and an autonomous city, Buenos Aires. It is the eighth-largest country in the world by land area and the largest among Spanish-speaking nations.

Religion in Argentina

Argentina, for much of its history and including the present day, has been an overwhelmingly Christian country. The largest Christian denomination in the country is Roman Catholicism. The historical background is very much due to the Spanish influence brought about through the newly conquered territories. However, immigration throughout the 20th century has brought other Catholics and denominations from various regions to Argentina. Overall, a 2008 survey found that 24% attended religious services regularly, and that 10.3% described themselves as atheist, agnostics, or having no religion. Only 35% of Argentines consider religion to be very important in their lives according to a 2015 Pew Research Center report. Argentina is also home to the largest Muslim community in Latin America, numbering at around 400,000 people or 1% of the total population.According to the last Latinobarómetro survey, as of 2017, 76% of the population of Argentina is Christian, 66% belong to the Roman Catholic Church, 10% is Evangelical, 21% are unaffiliated and 3% belong to other religions.

Topics in Buddhism
Foundations
The Buddha
Bodhisattvas
Disciples
Key concepts
Cosmology
Branches
Practices
Nirvana
Monasticism
Major figures
Texts
Countries
History
Philosophy
Culture
Miscellaneous
Comparison
Lists
Buddhism in South America
Sovereign states
Dependencies and
other territories

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.