Bud Palmer

John Shove "Bud" Palmer (September 14, 1921 – March 19, 2013) was an American professional basketball player. He was a member of the New York Knicks during the team's first three seasons in the Basketball Association of America, and was the leading scorer in the team's inaugural 1946–47 season. Palmer is considered to be one of the inventors of the jump shot.[1][2]

Born in Hollywood, California, Palmer was the son of footballer and actor Maurice Bennett "Lefty" Flynn and singer Blanche Palmer.[1] Palmer was 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m) when he started playing basketball at Hun School of Princeton, and started using the jump shot to compensate for his height.[1] He grew a foot taller to 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) by the time he began playing college basketball at Princeton University, and played for three seasons before he enlisted in the U.S. Navy during World War II.[1]

After his NBA career ended, Palmer went on to have a successful career as a sportscaster.[1][3] He was Chief of Protocol and Official Greeter for the City of New York for seven years during John Lindsay's administration.

Palmer died at 91 of metastatic prostate cancer in 2013 in West Palm Beach, Florida.[1][4]

Bud Palmer
Bud Palmer 1948
Palmer in 1948
Personal information
BornSeptember 14, 1921
Hollywood, California
DiedMarch 19, 2013 (aged 91)
West Palm Beach, Florida
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Listed weight180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High schoolHun (Princeton, New Jersey)
Phillips Exeter (Exeter, New Hampshire)
CollegePrinceton
Playing career1946–1949
PositionForward / Center
Number16
Career history
19461949New York Knicks
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

BAA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played  FG%  Field-goal percentage
 FT%  Free-throw percentage  APG  Assists per game
 PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP FG% FT% APG PPG
1946–47 New York 42 .307 .669 .8 9.5
1947–48 New York 48 .315 .744 .9 13.0
1948–49 New York 58 .350 .762 1.9 12.3
Career 148 .326 .739 1.3 11.7

Playoffs

Year Team GP FG% FT% APG PPG
1947 New York 5 .351 .600 .8 15.6
1948 New York 3 .421 .769 .0 14.0
1949 New York 6 .422 .771 1.7 13.5
Career 14 .388 .721 1.0 14.4

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Martin, Douglas (March 22, 2013). "Bud Palmer, Jump Shot Pioneer, Dies at 91". The New York Times. Accessed on June 22, 2017.
  2. ^ Christgau, John (1999). The Origins of the Jump Shot. Eight men who shook the world of Basketball. Lincoln (NE): University of Nebraska Press.
  3. ^ "Bud Palmer gave up a mike for hot dogs". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. December 26, 1975. p. 2B.
  4. ^ "Bud Palmer, broadcasting pioneer and ex-Knicks captain, dies at age 91". Palm Beach Post. March 21, 2013.
1946–47 New York Knicks season

The 1946–47 New York Knicks season was the first season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Knicks, the shortened form of Knickerbockers, named for Father Knickerbocker (a popular symbol of New York), are one of only two teams of the original National Basketball Association still located in its original city (the other being the Boston Celtics). The Knickerbockers first head coach was Neil Cohalan.

1947–48 New York Knicks season

The 1947–48 New York Knicks season was the second season for the team in the Basketball Association of America (BAA), which later became known as the National Basketball Association. The Knicks finished in second place in the Eastern Division with a 26–22 record and qualified for the BAA Playoffs. In the first round, New York was eliminated by the Baltimore Bullets in a best-of-three series, two games to one. Carl Braun was the team's scoring leader during the season.At the 1947 BAA draft, the Knicks selected Dick Holub in the first round, with the fifth overall pick. The 1947–48 season was the first as New York's head coach for Joe Lapchick, who had previously held the same position for college basketball's St. John's; he had been hired in March 1947. The Knicks had a 13–13 record in the first 26 games of the season before going on an eight-game winning streak from January 28 to February 11. However, New York won only four of its final 12 regular season contests.In game one of the first round of the playoffs, held in Baltimore, the Bullets defeated the Knicks 85–81 behind a 34-point performance by Connie Simmons. The Knicks evened the series at one victory apiece by winning the second game 79–69 in New York, as four players scored more than 10 points. The win forced a decisive third game back in Baltimore, which the Knicks lost 84–77. Simmons led the Bullets with 22 points, while Chick Reiser added 21. The Bullets went on to win the 1948 BAA Finals.

1948–49 New York Knicks season

The 1948–49 New York Knicks season was the third season for the team in the Basketball Association of America (BAA), which later became the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Knicks had a 32–28 record in 1948–49 and finished second in the Eastern Division, six games behind the Washington Capitols. New York qualified for the playoffs, and defeated the Baltimore Bullets 2–1 in a best-of-three series to earn a place in the Eastern Division Finals. In the division championship series, the Knicks lost to the Capitols, two games to one. Before the 1949–50 season, the BAA merged with the National Basketball League to form the NBA.

1961 U.S. Figure Skating Championships

The 1961 United States Figure Skating Championships was an event organized by U.S. Figure Skating to determine the U.S. national champions and the U.S. team for the 1961 World Championships. Medals were awarded in three colors: gold (first), silver (second), and bronze (third) in four disciplines – men's singles, ladies' singles, pair skating, and ice dancing – across three levels: senior, junior, and novice. The event was held at the World Arena in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from January 25 to 29, 1961. The competition was dedicated to the memory of Howard D. Herbert, president of the United States Figure Skating Association, who had died suddenly just a few days before the competition opened.

The event is noted especially for its catastrophic aftermath, in which most of the U.S. team died in the crash of Sabena Flight 548 on their way to the World Championships in Prague. Because many of the top American figure skaters (including Carol Heiss and David Jenkins) had retired from the sport after the 1960 Winter Olympics, new champions were crowned in all four disciplines.

The men's competition was won by Bradley Lord, likewise in a come-from-behind victory in the free skating after having been second to Gregory Kelley in the compulsory figures. In the ladies' event, Stephanie Westerfeld had a narrow lead over Laurence Owen after the compulsory figures and performed well enough in the free skating that she might have won the competition. However, Owen followed with a superior effort in the free skate and won the title on a 4-1 split of the first-place ordinals. Maribel Owen / Dudley Richards, the silver medalists from the previous year, were the clear winners of the pairs event, while Diane Sherbloom / Larry Pierce—skating in their first season together—took the ice dance championship.

A notable feature of this event is that it was the first time the United States Figure Skating Championships were covered on national television, with a modest rights fee being paid by CBS. Sportscaster Bud Palmer provided the "play-by-play", and Dick Button provided the commentary for the event, a role Button continued to perform for decades after the Championships broadcasts were picked up by ABC Sports in subsequent years.

CBS Sports

CBS Sports is the sports division of the American television network CBS. Its headquarters are in the CBS Building on West 52nd Street in midtown Manhattan, New York City, with programs produced out of Studio 43 at the CBS Broadcast Center on West 57th Street.

Its premier sports properties are the NFL, Southeastern Conference (SEC) football, NCAA basketball (including telecasts of the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament), and PGA Tour golf, including The Masters and the PGA Championship.

The online arm of CBS Sports is CBSSports.com. CBS purchased SportsLine.com in 2004, and today CBSSports.com is part of CBS Interactive. On February 26, 2018, following up on the success of their online news network CBSN, CBS Sports launched CBS Sports HQ, a 24/7, online only, linear sports news network. The network focuses entirely on sports news, results, highlights and analysis. (CBS Sports college sports and golf programming that it distributes over the air is generally made available for free via separate streams, as are a limited number of NFL national telecasts; the remainder requires a CBS All Access subscription to be viewed online, with CBS Sports Network programming requiring a TV Everywhere subscription.)

CBS Sports was honored at the 59th Annual Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Advanced Media Technology for Synchronous Enhancement of Original Television Content for Interactive Use for its program March Madness on Demand.

On August 31, 2013, CBS Sports rolled out its previous graphics and animation package that was first used in the network's coverage of Super Bowl XLVII. Additionally, in compliance with the Active Format Description #10 code, CBS Sports switched to a 16:9 aspect ratio letterbox presentation used for all sports programming, including the SEC on CBS and the NFL on CBS broadcasts.

On November 30, 2015, CBS Sports released a new logo in order to coincide with the network's coverage of Super Bowl 50. The network also created a new on-air graphics package that debuted as part of the network's Super Bowl week programming. Following the game, the graphics package began to be utilized across all of their programming events, including their joint production of NCAA March Madness with Turner Sports. The Masters, which retains heavy production control over their event, continued to use the network's older graphical style originally unveiled in 2007 until 2019, when they debuted a new graphics package. Also, the network's Thursday Night Football game broadcasts continued to use the graphical style originally used since its debut in 2014 until its rights to that package expired in 2018.

Jackpot Bowling

Jackpot Bowling (also known as Phillies Jackpot Bowling and Jackpot Bowling Starring Milton Berle) was a professional bowling show on NBC from January 9, 1959, to March 13, 1961.

Jump shot (basketball)

In basketball (and derivatives like netball), a player may attempt to score a basket by leaping straight into the air, the elbow of the shooting hand cocked, ball in hand above the head, and lancing the ball in a high arc towards the basket for a jump shot (colloquially, a jumper). Although early critics thought the leap might lead to indecision in the air, the jump shot replaced the earlier, less quickly released set shot, and eventually transformed the game because it is the easiest shot to make from a distance and more difficult for a defender to block. Variations on the simple jump shot include the "turnaround jumper" (facing away from the basket, then jumping and spinning towards it, shooting the ball in mid-air); the "fadeaway" (jumping away from the basket to create space); and the "leaning jumper" (jumping towards the basket to move away from a trailing defender). With the "hook shot," a player is turned sideways with the shooting arm away from the basket outstretched so that with a sweep he can launch the ball over his head. Since a defender must leap to block a jumper, the shooter may use a pump fake to get the defender in the air at the wrong time and so have a clear shot. If the shooter leaps into the defender, a foul is called on the defensive player, whereat the shooter is awarded two or three free throws according to the value of a missed attempt, or a single free throw if he scores.

Debate still continues as to who invented the jump shot. Although in the NCAA collegiate archives, John Miller Cooper, who played at the University of Missouri in the 1930s, is recognized as the person to hoist the first jump shot, in his The Origins of the Jump Shot, John Christgau makes a strong case that Ken Sailors did so in May 1934. Sailors went on to play for the University of Wyoming and was selected as MVP of their 1943 NCAA Championship team. Sailors also played for five different teams in the old American Basketball League. Other people that Christgau credits with the jump shot are Glen "Glenn" Roberts, Myer "Whitey" Skoog, John "Mouse" Gonzales, Bud Palmer, Davage "Dave" Minor, “Jumping” Joe Fulks, Johnny Adams, and Belus Smawley. Hank Luisetti is credited with popularizing the jump shot.

List of Daytona 500 broadcasters

The following is a list of the American television networks and announcers who have broadcast NASCAR's annual Daytona 500 throughout the years. Throughout its history, the Daytona 500 has been aired on all four major networks in the U.S., including ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox. In 1979, CBS covered the race live flag-to-flag for the first time. The unprecedented broadcast was considered risky by network executives, but was a rousing success when a snowstorm blanketed much of the east coast, prompting a huge viewing audience. An exciting and shocking finish capped off a telecast that was considered a ground-breaking moment in the history of NASCAR, and one of the defining moments that helped elevate the sport into the mainstream.

Currently, Fox holds exclusive rights to carry the Daytona 500 in the United States, under the terms of contract extensions that run through the 2024 NASCAR season. As part of the package, Fox also holds the exclusive rights to support events held during Daytona 500 Speedweeks, including the Clash, Daytona 500 pole qualifying, the Duels, the Truck Series race, the Xfinity Series race, and the respective practice sessions. Some of the ancillary events are aired on Fox companion channels FS1 and FS2.

List of ESPN/ABC golf commentators

The following is a list of commentators who worked for ABC's Wide World of Sports golf coverage from 1966-1989 and 1990-1996 and the ESPN/ABC combined effort for coverage of both the PGA Tour (1997-2006) and the major championships (1997-present).

List of NBA All-Star Game broadcasters

The following is a list of American television and radio networks and announcers that have nationally broadcast the NBA All-Star Games throughout the years.

Maurice Bennett Flynn

Maurice Bennett Flynn (May 26, 1892 – March 6, 1959) was an American football player and actor. He was also known as "Lefty" Flynn because in football, he kicked with his left foot.

NASCAR on television in the 1960s

One of the earliest telecasts of a NASCAR race was the 1960 Daytona 500, parts of which was presented as part of CBS Sports Spectacular, with announcer Bud Palmer.In the ensuing years, but before 1979, there were three main sources of NASCAR telecasts:

ABC's Wide World of Sports, the sports anthology program, provided coverage of select NASCAR Winston Cup races in the 1970s. In 1971, it presented a 200-lap race at Greenville-Pickens Speedway in its entirety, the first such broadcast of a NASCAR race. Throughout the 1970s, ABC presented portions of the Daytona 500, Southern 500, and other important races.

In the late 1970s, CBS Sports Spectacular aired some races; like Wide World of Sports, they were taped and edited.

Car and Track, a weekly auto racing show hosted by Bud Lindemann, recapped all of NASCAR's top-series races in the 1960s and 1970s in a weekly 30-minute syndicated show.

NASCAR on television in the 1970s

One of the earliest telecasts of a NASCAR race was the 1960 Daytona 500, parts of which was presented as part of CBS Sports Spectacular, with announcer Bud Palmer.In the ensuing years, but before 1979, there were three main sources of NASCAR telecasts:

ABC's Wide World of Sports, the sports anthology program, provided coverage of select NASCAR Winston Cup races in the 1970s. In 1971, it presented a 200-lap race at Greenville-Pickens Speedway in its entirety, the first such broadcast of a NASCAR race. Throughout the 1970s, ABC presented portions of the Daytona 500, Southern 500, and other important races.

In the late 1970s, CBS Sports Spectacular aired some races; like Wide World of Sports, they were taped and edited.

Car and Track, a weekly auto racing show hosted by Bud Lindemann, recapped all of NASCAR's top-series races in the 1960s and 1970s in a weekly 30-minute syndicated show.CBS Sports President Neal Pilson and motor-sports editor Ken Squier believed that America would watch an entire stock car race live on television. On February 18, 1979, CBS presented the first flag-to-flag coverage of the Daytona 500. Richard Petty won NASCAR's crown-jewel race for the sixth time, but the big story was the post-race fight on the track's infield between Cale Yarborough and Donnie Allison, who crashed together on the final lap while leading. The race drew incredible ratings, in part due to the compelling action both on and off the track, and in part because a major snowstorm on the East Coast kept millions of viewers indoors.

NHL on television in the 1960s

From 1965 through 1975, in addition to the Saturday night game on CBC, Hockey Night in Canada also produced and broadcast a Wednesday night game on CTV, CBC's privately owned competitor; beginning in the 1975-76 NHL season, these midweek games would begin to be broadcast by local stations.

Wild West World

Wild West World was a Wild West theme park in Park City, Kansas that opened on May 5, 2007 and closed on July 9, 2007. It was located on 130 acres (53 ha) along Interstate 135 near Phil Ruffin's Wichita Greyhound Park, which closed the same year.

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