Bud Bonar

Reyman Edward "Bud" Bonar (July 26, 1906 – November 21, 1970) was an American football player and coach from Bellaire, Ohio.

As a senior at Bellaire High School in 1926, Bonar was the football team captain and quarterback. His team posted an undefeated record of 9-0-1 and was the champion of the Ohio Valley Athletic Conference. After graduation, he enrolled at West Virginia University but later would transfer to Notre Dame.

As the quarterback for Notre Dame under head coach Hunk Anderson, he was unable to replicate his success from high school. His lone campaign as a starter in 1933 resulted in a record of 3-5-1 including six games where the Irish offense was shut out. His career highlight occurred when his drop-kick extra point enabled Notre Dame to defeat 9-0 Army by the score of 13-12 on December 2, 1933 in Yankee Stadium.

After graduation, Bonar played one year of professional football in the CFL before becoming an assistant coach at the University of Cincinnati. He would return to coach the team at his old high school from 1949 to 1958, and would win the OVAC championship twice, in 1950 and 1954.

Bonar held the position of Bellaire's athletic director when he died of a heart attack in 1970, purportedly while watching a broadcast of the Notre Dame vs. LSU game.

Bud Bonar
Biographical details
BornJuly 26, 1906
Bellaire, Ohio
DiedNovember 21, 1970 (aged 64)
Playing career
1933Notre Dame
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
?Cincinnati (assistant)
1949–1958Bellaire High

References

  • Steele, Michael R. The Fighting Irish Football Encyclopedia. Champaign, IL: Sports Publishing LLC (1996). p. 72-74
  • BellaireBigReds.com, "BellaireBigReds Records".
  • "Rites for Former Notre Dame Player". Raleigh Register. Beckley, WV. November 24, 1970.
Anthony Chez

Anthony Wencel Chez (January 12, 1872 – December 30, 1937) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Wabash College (1900), DePauw University (1901), the University of Cincinnati (1902–1903), and West Virginia University (1904), compiling a career college football record of 24–20–2. Chez was also the head basketball coach at Cincinnati (1902–1904) and West Virginia (1904–1907), amassing a career college basketball record of 23–30. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Wabash in 1901 and Cincinnati from 1902 to 1904, tallying a career college baseball mark of 20–16–2. From 1904 to 1913 Chez served as West Virginia's athletic director.

Bonar (name)

Bonar is both a surname of Scottish origin, and a given name. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

Andrew Bonar (1810–1892), minister

Bud Bonar (1906–1970), football player

Dan Bonar (born 1956), ice hockey player

Haley Bonar (born 1983), singer-songwriter

Horatius Bonar (1808–1889), poet and minister

Ian Bonar, actor

James Bonar (politician) (1840–1901), New Zealand merchant, shipping agent, company director and politician

James Bonar (civil servant) (1852–1941), Scottish civil servant, economist and historian

Jane Lundie Bonar (1821–1884), Scottish hymnwriter

John Bonar, set decorator

Maureen Bonar, curler

Paul Bonar (born 1976), Scottish footballer

Thomas Bonar, publisherGiven name:

Bonar Bain (1923–2005), actor

Bonar Colleano (1924–1958), actor

Bonar Law (1858–1923), politician

Sir Bonar Neville-Kingdom (born 1949), UK civil servant

Boyd Chambers

Boyd Blaine "Fox" Chambers (November 10, 1884 – April 26, 1964) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Marshall University from 1909 to 1916, at Bethany College in West Virginia in 1917, and at the University of Cincinnati from 1918 to 1921, compiling a career college football record of 50–44–7. Chambers was also the head basketball coach at Marshall during the 1908–09 season and at Cincinnati from 1918 to 1928, tallying a career college basketball mark of 122–97. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Marshall (1910–1917), Cincinnati (1919–1928), and Miami University (1932), amassing a career college baseball record of 163–104–4.

Cincinnati Bearcats baseball

Cincinnati Bearcats baseball is the varsity intercollegiate team representing the University of Cincinnati in the sport of college baseball at the Division I level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The team is led by Ty Neal, and plays its home games at Marge Schott Stadium on campus in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Bearcats are members of the American Athletic Conference. Some notable alumni include Hall of Famers Sandy Koufax and Miller Huggins, All-Star and World Series Champion Kevin Youkilis, and All-Star Josh Harrison.

Dana M. King

Dana M. King (1890 – April 19, 1952) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Cincinnati from 1931 to 1934, compiling a record of 25–10–1.

Ed Jucker

Edwin Louis Jucker (July 8, 1916 – February 2, 2002) was an American basketball and baseball coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head basketball coach at the United States Merchant Marine Academy from 1945 to 1948, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) from 1948 to 1953, the University of Cincinnati from 1960 to 1965, and Rollins College from 1972 to 1977, compiling a career college basketball coaching record of 270–122. He led the Cincinnati Bearcats men's basketball program to consecutive national titles, winning the NCAA Basketball Tournament in 1961 and 1962. Jucker was also the head coach of the Cincinnati Bearcats baseball team from 1954 to 1960 while serving as an assistant coach for the basketball team. He spent two seasons coaching in the professional ranks, leading the Cincinnati Royals of the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1967 to 1969. Jucker served as the athletic director at Rollins College from 1981 to 1983.

Jim Schmitz

Jim Schmitz is an American college baseball coach, formerly the head coach at Wilmington (OH) (1984–1986), Cincinnati (1987–1990), and Eastern Illinois (1995–2015).

Joseph A. Meyer

Joseph A. Meyer (c. 1895 – July 14, 1970) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Xavier University from 1920 to 1935 and at the University of Cincinnati from 1938 to 1942. Meyer was also the head basketball coach at Xavier from 1920 to 1933, tallying a mark of 94–52. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Xavier in 1926 and at Cincinnati in 1942, amassing a career college baseball record of 14–10. Meyer played basketball and baseball at the University of Notre Dame. He died at the age of 75 on July 14, 1970 at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish starting quarterbacks

The following individuals have started games at quarterback for the University of Notre Dame football team, updated through the 2018 season.

The year of induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, if applicable, is designated alongside the respective player's final season.

List of University of Notre Dame athletes

This list of University of Notre Dame athletes includes graduates, non-graduate former students, and current students of Notre Dame who are notable for their achievements within athletics, sometimes before or after their time at Notre Dame. Other alumni can be found in the list of University of Notre Dame alumni.

Although Notre Dame is highly ranked academically, it has also been called a "jock school" as it has produced a large number of athletes. Intercollegiate sports teams at Notre Dame are called the "Fighting Irish". Notre Dame offers 13 varsity sports for both men and women: Men's American Football, Men's Baseball, Men's and Women's Basketball, Men's and Women's Cross Country, Men's and Women's Fencing, Men's and Women's Golf, Men's Ice Hockey, Men's and Women's Lacrosse, Women's Rowing, Men's and Women's Soccer, Women's Softball, Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving, Men's and Women's Tennis, Men's and Women's Track and Field, and Women's Volleyball. Approximately 400 students have gone on to play professional American football in the National Football League, the American Football League, or the All-America Football Conference, with many others going to play other sports professionally. Some athletes have also participated in the Olympic Games.

Richard Skeel

Richard Skeel is an American college administrator and baseball coach, currently serving as the senior associate athletic director at Dalton State College in Dalton, Georgia. Dalton State is reestablishing its athletic department for NAIA competition beginning in the 2013–14 academic year. He has previously served as head baseball coach at Cincinnati and Bethune-Cookman.

Scott Googins

Scott Googins is an American college baseball coach who is the head coach of the University of Cincinnati Bearcats Baseball Team. Googins was hired on June 6, 2017. He left Xavier after being the skipper of the Musketeers baseball team since the start of the 2006 season. Under Googins, Xavier appeared in three NCAA Tournaments. In 2008, he was named the A-10 Coach of the Year, and in 2009, he was named the ABCA Mideast Region Coach of the Year. Googins is an alumnus of Ohio Wesleyan University, where he played baseball for the Battling Bishops.

Ty Neal

Ty Neal is an American college baseball coach and former player. Currently, Neal serves as a quality control coach for the Arizona State Sun Devils baseball program. He had served as head coach of the Cincinnati Bearcats baseball team from 2014–2017. His first season with the Bearcats was 2014. On May 23, 2017, two days before Cincinnati was scheduled to play its first game in the American Athletic Conference tournament, it was announced Neal would step down from his head coaching responsibilities. The announcement cited personal reasons as the only factor.Neal was a four-year letterman at Miami, earning 11 victories as a pitcher. He began his coaching career as an assistant with the RedHawks for one season before moving to Southern Illinois for three years. After a one-year return to Miami, he spent a year on staff at Cincinnati and an eight-year stint with Indiana, where he added pitching coach and recruiting coordinator duties. In 2013, he helped lead the Hoosiers to their first College World Series. On June 7, 2013, Neal was named head coach at Cincinnati, and took over the duties following Indiana's elimination from the 2013 College World Series.

William A. Reynolds

William Ayres Reynolds (December 30, 1872 – August 10, 1928) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He played football at Princeton University and served as the head football coach at Rutgers University (1891), the University of Cincinnati (1896), the University of North Carolina (1897–1900), and the University of Georgia (1901–1902), compiling a career record of 44–23–8. Reynolds was also the head baseball coach at Cincinnati (1897), North Carolina (1898–1899) and Georgia (1902–1903), tallying a career mark of 36–19–2.

At North Carolina, as a football coach, he coached the Tar Heels to an undefeated season in 1897 (9–0) and had an overall record of 27–7–4 during his four seasons. As a baseball coach, Reynolds compiled a 21–5–1 record in two seasons at North Carolina.

Reynolds did not enjoy the same level of success at Georgia in either sport. As the Georgia football head coach, he compiled a record of just 5–7–3 during his two-year stay. As a baseball coach, Reynolds fared better, posting a 13–9–1 record over two seasons.

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