Buck Rodgers

Robert Leroy "Buck" Rodgers (born August 16, 1938) is a former catcher, manager and coach in Major League Baseball. He managed three major league teams: the Milwaukee Brewers (1980–82), Montreal Expos (1985–91) and California Angels (1991–94), compiling a career won-lost mark of 784–773 (.504).

Buck Rodgers
Catcher / Manager
Born: August 16, 1938 (age 80)
Delaware, Ohio
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 8, 1961, for the Los Angeles Angels
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 1969, for the California Angels
MLB statistics
Batting average.232
Home runs31
Runs batted in288
Managerial record784–774
Winning %.503
Teams
As player

As manager

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Playing career

Born in Delaware, Ohio, Rodgers graduated from Prospect High School in 1956 and was a star basketball player as well scoring over 1,700 points in his career and averaging 25 points per game over his Junior and Senior seasons with a high of 55 in 1956. He attended Ohio Wesleyan University and Ohio Northern University. As a player, he signed his first professional contract with the Detroit Tigers in 1956, spent five years in their farm system, and was selected by the Angels in the 1960 MLB Expansion Draft.

He was a top defensive catcher and a switch-hitter who played nine major league seasons (1961–69), all with the Angels, compiling a .232 batting average with 704 hits, 114 doubles, 18 triples and 31 home runs in 932 games played. As a player, Rodgers caught Bo Belinsky's no-hitter on May 5, 1962.[1]

Managerial career

In between his playing and managing careers, Rodgers served as a coach for the Minnesota Twins (1970–74), San Francisco Giants (1976), and the Brewers (1978–80). He managed in the Angels' farm system in 1975 and 1977. His managerial career was book-ended by unusual circumstances.

Milwaukee Brewers

He first became manager of the Brewers (then a contending team in the American League East Division) on an acting basis at the outset of the 1980 season. He was serving as the club's third-base coach when pilot George Bamberger suffered a heart attack. Rodgers posted a record of 26–21 as acting field boss until Bamberger was able to return June 4. However, with the Brewers treading water under Bamberger with a record of 47–45, the manager stepped down on September 9, 1980, and Rodgers resumed the helm, the team winning 13 of its last 23 games to ultimately finish third. The 1981 campaign was disrupted for six weeks by an in-season players' strike, which caused the major leagues to adopt a split-season format. Rodgers led the Brewers to the best overall record in the AL East at 62–47 and the second half title, but Milwaukee lost the divisional playoff to the New York Yankees, three games to two. It would be Rodgers' only postseason appearance as a manager. In 1982, the Brewers started slowly under Rodgers and he was fired June 1 with the team's record a poor 23–24. The Brewers then turned their season around under his successor, batting coach Harvey Kuenn, to finish with 95 wins and went on to win their only American League pennant as "Harvey's Wallbangers."

Montreal Expos

After guiding the Indianapolis Indians of the AAA American Association to the 1984 regular season championship, Rodgers was promoted to manager of the parent Expos, replacing Jim Fanning. His first six years (198590) in Montreal were largely successful, with the Expos averaging almost 84 wins per season, but when the team faltered in 1991, winning only 20 of its first 49 games, Rodgers was replaced as manager by Tom Runnells on June 2.[2]

California Angels

He was not out of work long. On August 26, 1991, the Angels fired Doug Rader and hired Rodgers as their new pilot.[3] Rodgers—still well-known from his playing days with the Angel teams of the 1960s—led the Halos to a 20–18 record for the remainder of the campaign, and was 39 games into his first full season as Angel manager in 1992 when a bus carrying the California club was involved in an expressway accident in New Jersey on May 20; Rodgers was seriously injured and missed almost 90 games. He returned late August, but still felt the after-effects of his injuries. Perhaps more damaging, the Angels did not respond to his leadership. They posted a losing mark in the final weeks of 1992, finished 20 games below .500 in 1993, and were only 16–23 on May 16, 1994, when Rodgers was replaced by Marcel Lachemann.

Managerial statistics

Team From To Regular season record Post–season record Ref.
W L Win % W L Win %
Milwaukee Brewers 1980 1982 124 102 .549 2 3 .400 [4]
Montreal Expos 1985 1991 520 499 .510 [4]
California Angels 1991 1992 39 38 .506 [4]
California Angels 1992 1994 101 135 .428 [4]
Total 784 774 .503 2 3 .400

References

  1. ^ http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1962/B05050LAA1962.htm
  2. ^ Rodgers fired as Expos' boss
  3. ^ Angels fire Doug Rader
  4. ^ a b c d "Buck Rodgers". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved September 21, 2015.

External links

Preceded by
Charlie Silvera
Minnesota Twins bullpen coach
1970–1973
Succeeded by
Jerry Zimmerman
(1976)
Preceded by
Al Worthington
Minnesota Twins pitching coach
1974
Succeeded by
Lee Stange
Preceded by
Don McMahon
San Francisco Giants pitching coach
1976
Succeeded by
Herm Starrette
Preceded by
Jimmy Bragan
Milwaukee Brewers third base coach
1978–1980
Succeeded by
Harry Warner
1964 Los Angeles Angels season

The 1964 Los Angeles Angels season involved the Angels finishing fifth in the American League with a record of 82 wins and 80 losses, 17 games behind the AL Champion New York Yankees.

1977 Caribbean Series

The twentieth edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 1977. It was held from February 4 through February 9 with the champions teams from the Dominican Republic, Tigres del Licey; Mexico, Venados de Mazatlán; Puerto Rico, Criollos de Caguas and Venezuela, Navegantes del Magallanes. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice, and the games were played at UCV Stadium in Caracas, Venezuela.

1980 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1980 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing third in the American League East with a record of 86 wins and 76 losses. The Brewers hit eight grand slams, the most in MLB in 1980.

1987 Major League Baseball season

The 1987 Major League Baseball season ended with the American League Champion Minnesota Twins winning the World Series over the National League Champion St. Louis Cardinals, four games to three, as all seven games were won by the home team.

Future Hall of Famer Ken Griffey, Jr. was selected with the #1 overall pick in the draft in June by the Seattle Mariners.

1991 Major League Baseball season

The 1991 Major League Baseball season saw the Minnesota Twins defeat the Atlanta Braves for the World Series title, in a series where every game was won by the home team.

1991 Montreal Expos season

The 1991 Montreal Expos season was the 23rd season in franchise history. After several winning seasons, the Expos faltered in 1991, winning only 20 of its first 49 games. Manager Buck Rodgers was replaced as manager by Tom Runnells. The team ultimately finished 71-90.

1992 California Angels season

The California Angels 1992 season involved the Angels finishing 5th in the American League West with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses.

1993 California Angels season

The California Angels 1993 season involved the Angels finishing 5th in the American League west with a record of 71 wins and 91 losses.

1994 California Angels season

The California Angels 1994 season involved the Angels finishing 4th in the American League West with a record of 47 wins and 68 losses. The season was cut short by the 1994 player's strike.

Buck Rogers (disambiguation)

Buck Rogers is a science fiction character.

Buck Rogers may also refer to:

Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (radio series), a 1932–47 radio series based on the character

Buck Rogers (serial), a 1939 film serial based on the character

Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (TV series), a 1979–81 television series based on the character

Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (film), a 1979 theatrical film that was the pilot for the television series

Buck Rogers XXVC, a pen-and-paper roleplaying game system based on the above character

Buck Rogers: A Life in the Future, a 1995 novel by Martin Caidin based upon the character

Buck Rogers – Battle for the 25th Century, a board game based upon the character

"Buck Rogers" (song), by the rock group Feeder

Ed Sadowski

Edward Roman Sadowski (January 19, 1931 – November 6, 1993) was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1960 through 1966 for the Boston Red Sox (1960), Los Angeles Angels (1961–1963) and Atlanta Braves (1966). Sadowski batted and threw right-handed. He debuted on April 20, 1960 and played his final game on October 2, 1966. He was the brother of Bob Sadowski and Ted Sadowski, and uncle of Jim Sadowski. All were pitchers who played in the Major Leagues.

Coming from a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania baseball family, Sadowski was a valuable backup catcher for Russ Nixon in Boston, Earl Averill and Buck Rodgers with the original Angels, and Joe Torre in Atlanta. In 1963 he appeared in a career-high 80 games and collected four home runs with 24 runs and 15 RBI, also career-numbers.

In a five-season career, Sadowski was a .202 hitter with 12 home runs and 39 RBI in 217 games.

He was the last Red Sox player to wear uniform No. 8 before it was issued in 1961 to eventual Baseball Hall of Fame outfielder Carl Yastrzemski. The number was retired in 1989.

Following his playing career, Sadowski served as a minor league manager and pitching instructor for the Montreal Expos. He retired from baseball in 1970, becoming a physical education teacher in California. He died in Garden Grove at age 62, after suffering amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.

Joe Maddon

Joseph John Maddon Jr. (born February 8, 1954) is an American professional baseball manager for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). Maddon began his coaching career in MLB with the California Angels in 1993 and served under managers Buck Rodgers, Marcel Lachemann, John McNamara, Terry Collins, and Mike Scioscia. He served two stints as interim manager during this time. He managed the Tampa Bay Rays from 2006 through 2014, winning the 2008 American League pennant. After opting out of his contract following the 2014 season, he joined the Cubs, led them to the 2015 National League Championship Series and was named the 2015 National League Manager of the Year. In 2016, Maddon managed the Cubs to their first World Series title since 1908.

John Wathan

John David Wathan (; born October 4, 1949) is a former Major League Baseball catcher and manager for the Kansas City Royals. In 1982, he stole 36 bases, breaking the single-season record for catchers set by Ray Schalk in 1916 despite his suffering a fractured ankle earlier in the season.Wathan, nicknamed "The Duke" for his dead-on impersonations of John Wayne, was drafted in the first round, fourth overall in the 1971 MLB Draft from the University of San Diego, where he played college baseball for the Toreros in 1968–70.Wathan played ten seasons with the Royals from 1976 to 1985 where he played in 860 games, averaging a career .262 batting average with 21 home runs and 261 RBIs. Wathan has his best season in 1980 in which he played in 126 games, and had a .305 batting average.

After he retired, Wathan coached for the Royals in 1986 before becoming the manager of Kansas City's AAA Omaha Royals farm club and he was promoted manager for the big-league Royals on August 28, 1987. He managed five seasons in Kansas City, having two winning seasons in 1988 and 1989 and finishing second in the American League West both times. He was fired early in the 1991 season after a 15–22 start.In 1992, Wathan began the season as the third-base coach of the California Angels, but he was named acting manager midway through the campaign when Buck Rodgers was badly hurt in a bus accident and took a medical leave of absence. Wathan led the Angels to a 39–50 record until Rodgers was well enough to return. He spent 1994 as a Boston Red Sox coach, worked as a color analyst on Royals telecasts in 1996 and 1997, and has worked as a scout and minor league instructor for a number of organizations since. In 2006-07, Wathan was a roving baserunning and bunting instructor in Kansas City's farm system, and in 2008 he served the Royals as a special assistant to the director of player development.

Two of John's sons, Derek and Dusty, played professional baseball. Derek played minor league baseball from 1998 to 2008, while Dusty played briefly for the Royals in 2002 and is the current third-base coach of the Philadelphia Phillies.

List of Los Angeles Angels managers

There have been 21 managers in the history of the Los Angeles Angels Major League Baseball franchise. The Angels are based in Anaheim, California. They are members of the American League West division of the American League (AL) in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Angels franchise was formed in 1961 as a member of the American League. The team was formerly called the California Angels, the Anaheim Angels, and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, before settling with the Los Angeles Angels.

Bill Rigney became the first manager of the then Los Angeles Angels in 1961, serving for just over eight seasons before being fired by Angels owner Gene Autry during the 1969 season. In terms of tenure, Mike Scioscia has managed more games and seasons than any other coach in franchise history. He managed the Angels to six playoff berths (2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, and 2009) led the team to a World Series championship in 2002, and won the Manager of the Year award in 2002 and 2009. With the Angels' 2009 Playoff appearance, Mike Scioscia became the first Major League Baseball manager "to guide his team to playoffs six times in [his] first 10 seasons." None of Scioscia's predecessors made it to the World Series. Dick Williams and Whitey Herzog, who served as an interim manager immediately before Williams, are the only Angels managers to have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

There have been 16 interim managers in Angels history. In 1969, manager Bill Rigney was fired and replaced by Lefty Phillips. In 1974, manager Whitey Herzog replaced Bobby Winkles. After four games with Herzog at the helm, Dick Williams took over the managerial job and was then replaced with Norm Sherry. A year later, Sherry was replaced by Dave Garcia. Garcia didn't last a full season either, as Jim Fregosi took over as manager in 1978. In 1981, Fregosi was replaced in the mid-season by Gene Mauch. In 1988, manager Cookie Rojas was replaced eight games before the end of the season. After a start of 61 wins and 63 losses in 1991, manager Doug Rader was fired and was replaced by Buck Rodgers. A season later, Rodgers was replaced by Marcel Lachemann, who took the position for four games. He was then succeeded by John Wathan. Rodgers returned as manager in 1993, but he was soon replaced by Lachemann. In 1996, Lachemann was replaced by John McNamara, who in turn was replaced by Joe Maddon. In 1999, Terry Collins resigned as manager in mid-season. Joe Maddon finished the season. Mauch, Rodgers, Lachemann, McNamara, and Maddon have had two stints as manager.

As of 2019, Brad Ausmus replaced Mike Scioscia as manager of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

List of Milwaukee Brewers managers

The Milwaukee Brewers Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise of the National League has employed 19 managers and 9 general managers (GMs) during its 50 seasons of play. Established in Seattle, Washington as the Seattle Pilots in 1969, the team became the Milwaukee Brewers after relocating to Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1970. The franchise played in the American League until 1998, when it moved to the National League as a part of MLB's realignment plan. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. In contrast, the general manager controls player transactions, hiring and firing of the coaching staff, and negotiates with players and agents regarding contracts.

The team's first manager, Joe Schultz, stayed with the Pilots for the entire 1969 season, but was released before the move to Milwaukee. Buck Rodgers managed the team in 1981 when the Brewers won the American League second-half East Division title. Due to the 1981 Major League Baseball strike, the season was split into two halves. The winners of each half met in the league division series. Rodgers and Harvey Kuenn managed the Brewers in 1982, leading them to win the American League pennant. Rodgers managed the team's first 47 games of the season before being fired and replaced by Kuenn. In 2008, Ned Yost and Dale Sveum, who took over for the fired Yost for the team's last 12 regular season games, led the team to win the National League wild card. Ken Macha managed the club for the 2009 and 2010 seasons but failed to lead the team to the playoffs. It was announced after the completion of the 2010 season that Macha's 2011 option would not be picked up. Ron Roenicke was hired to replace Macha for the 2011 season. Roenicke led the team to a franchise-best 96 wins during the 2011 season in addition to the Brewers' first NL Central title ever and first playoff series win since 1982. On May 3, 2015, they fired manager Roenicke after a dismal 7-18 start to the season. The following day, Craig Counsell was named the 19th manager in team history. Counsell had worked in the Brewer's front office since 2012.Phil Garner won 563 games from 1992 to 1999, giving him more wins than any other manager in franchise history. Having managed the team for 1,180 games, he is also the longest-tenured manager in team history. Harvey Kuenn's .576 winning percentage is the highest of all Brewers managers who have managed the team for more than one full season. Conversely, the lowest winning percentage over a season or more is .395, by the team's first manager, Joe Schultz. These records are correct as of the end of the 2018 season.

List of Washington Nationals managers

The Washington Nationals are an American professional baseball franchise based in Washington, D.C. They are members of the National League (NL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). The team began playing in 1969 as an expansion team in Montreal, Quebec, then known as the Montreal Expos. There have been 18 different managers in the franchise's history. The team has played its home games at the Nationals Park since 2008. The Nationals are owned by Ted Lerner, with Mike Rizzo as their general manager.The Expos' first manager was Gene Mauch, who managed for six seasons. Felipe Alou is the franchise's all-time leader in regular season games managed (1,408) and regular season game wins (691). Jim Fanning is the only Expos manager to have gone into the post-season. Buck Rodgers and Alou are the only managers to have won the NL Manager of the Year Award with the Expos, in 1987 and 1994 respectively. Karl Kuehl, Jim Fanning, and Tom Runnells have all spent their entire MLB managing careers with the Expos/Nationals. After Manny Acta was fired during the 2009 season, Jim Riggleman, the bench coach, was named interim manager to replace him, and was promoted to the position full-time for the 2010 season. After Riggleman resigned during the 2011 season and John McLaren ran the team for three games as an interim manager, the team hired veteran manager Davey Johnson, who had previously served as an advisor to Rizzo. Johnson led the team to the 2012 National League East title and the franchise's first playoff berth since moving to Washington and was 2012's NL Manager of the Year, but the team did not advance past the 2012 National League Division Series. Johnson retired after the 2013 season. Matt Williams took over in 2014, leading the team to another National League East title that season, and was 2014 NL Manager of the Year, but the team did not advance past the 2014 NLDS, and Williams was fired after an unsuccessful second year in 2015. Dusty Baker managed the team in 2016 and 2017, leading it to consecutive National League East titles, but the team did not advance beyond the NLDS in either season and Baker's contract was not renewed after the 2017 season. The Nationals hired Dave Martinez in October 2017 to take the helm in 2018

Major League Baseball Manager of the Year Award

In Major League Baseball, the Manager of the Year Award is an honor given annually since 1983 to the best managers in the American League (AL) and the National League (NL). The winner is voted on by 30 members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). Each places a vote for first, second, and third place among the managers of each league. The manager with the highest score in each league wins the award.Several managers have won the award in a season when they led their team to 100 or more wins. Lou Piniella won 116 games with the Seattle Mariners in 2001, the most by a winning manager, and Joe Torre won 114 with the New York Yankees in 1998. Sparky Anderson and Tony La Russa finished with identical 104–58 records in 1984 and 1988, respectively. Three National League managers, including Dusty Baker, Whitey Herzog, and Larry Dierker, have exceeded the century mark as well. Baker's San Francisco Giants won 103 games in 1993; Dierker's 1998 Houston Astros won 102 and Herzog led the Cardinals to 101 wins in the award's third season.In 1991, Bobby Cox became the first manager to win the award in both leagues, winning with the Atlanta Braves and having previously won with the Toronto Blue Jays in 1985. La Russa, Piniella, Jim Leyland, Bob Melvin, Davey Johnson, and Joe Maddon have since won the award in both leagues. Cox and La Russa have won the most awards, with four. Baker, Leyland, Piniella, Showalter and Maddon have won three times. In 2005, Cox became the first manager to win the award in consecutive years. Bob Melvin and Brian Snitker are the most recent winners.

Because of the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike cut the season short and cancelled the post-season, the BBWAA writers effectively created a de facto mythical national championship (similar to college football) by naming managers of the unofficial league champions (lead the leagues in winning percentage) (Buck Showalter and Felipe Alou) as Managers of the Year. Two franchises, the New York Mets and the Milwaukee Brewers, have not had a manager win the award.

Only six managers have won the award while leading a team that finished outside the top two spots in its division. Ted Williams was the first, after leading the "expansion" Washington Senators to a third-place finish (and, at 86-76, their only winning season) in the American League East, in 1969. Buck Rodgers won the award in 1987 with the third-place Expos. Tony Peña and Showalter won the award with third-place teams in back-to-back years: Peña with the Royals in 2003, and Showalter with the Rangers in 2004. Joe Girardi is the only manager to win the award with a fourth-place team (2006 Florida Marlins); he is also the only manager to win the award after fielding a team with a losing record.

Marcel Lachemann

Marcel Ernest Lachemann (born June 13, 1941) is an American professional baseball executive and a former player, manager and pitching coach in Major League Baseball (MLB). As a player, he was a relief pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. He is currently a special assistant to the general manager of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

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