Bubbles Hargrave

Eugene Franklin "Bubbles" Hargrave (July 15, 1892 – February 23, 1969) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds, and New York Yankees. He won the National League batting title in 1926 while playing for Cincinnati. He was nicknamed "Bubbles" because he stuttered when saying "B" sounds.[1] Bubbles' younger brother, Pinky Hargrave, was also a major league catcher.

Bubbles Hargrave
Bubbles Hargrave, 1914
Catcher
Born: July 15, 1892
New Haven, Indiana
Died: February 23, 1969 (aged 76)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 18, 1913, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
September 6, 1930, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Batting average.310
Home runs29
Runs batted in376
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Biography

Hargrave was born in New Haven, Indiana. He started his professional baseball career in 1911 in the Central League and made his major league debut in 1913 with the Chicago Cubs. He was their backup catcher until 1915. From 1916 to 1920, he played mostly in the American Association. In 1920, he had a big season with the St. Paul Saints, batting .335 with 22 home runs and finishing second in the league batting race. St. Paul won the pennant.[2]

Hargrave was then acquired by the Cincinnati Reds. He was their starting catcher for most of the 1920s and consistently put up good hitting numbers. In 1926, he won the National League batting title with a .353 average. The rules at the time required batting champions to play in at least 100 games, and Hargrave pinch hit several times to get to 105. He was the first catcher to lead the NL in batting average.[3] In 1927, he led the league's catchers in fielding percentage.

Hargrave went back to St. Paul for the 1929 season. He managed the club to a second-place finish and also made the league All-Star team.[4] He batted .369 in 104 games.[5] The following year, Hargrave served as a backup catcher for the New York Yankees. He then went back to the minors for a few seasons before retiring in 1934.

After his baseball days, Hargrave worked for a valve company.[6] He died at age 76 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1962 and the Indiana Baseball Hall of Fame in 2005.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Bubbles Hargrave". cincinnati.reds.mlb.com. Retrieved October 3, 2012.
  2. ^ "1920 St. Paul Saints". minorleaguebaseball.com. Retrieved 2010-11-04.
  3. ^ "Bubbles Hargrave Biography" Archived February 8, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. baseballlibrary.com. Retrieved 2010-11-04.
  4. ^ "Saint Paul Saints History 1920-1939". usfamily.net. Retrieved 2010-11-04.
  5. ^ "Bubbles Hargrave Minor League Statistics & History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2010-11-04.
  6. ^ "Bubbles Hargrave's Obit". thedeadballera.com. Retrieved 2010-11-04.

External links

1892 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1892 throughout the world.

1913 Chicago Cubs season

The 1913 Chicago Cubs season was the 42nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 38th in the National League and the 21st at West Side Park. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 88–65.

1914 Chicago Cubs season

The 1914 Chicago Cubs season was the 43rd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 39th in the National League and the 22nd at West Side Park. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 78–76.

1915 Chicago Cubs season

The 1915 Chicago Cubs season was the 44th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 40th in the National League and the 23rd and final at West Side Park. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 73–80.

1921 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1921 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 70–83, 24 games behind the New York Giants.

1923 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1923 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with a record of 91–63, 4½ games behind the New York Giants.

1925 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1925 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 80–73, 15 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1926 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1926 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League with 87 wins and 67 losses, 2 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1926 Major League Baseball season

The 1926 Major League Baseball season.

1927 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1927 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–78, 18½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1928 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1928 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 78–74, 16 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1929 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1929 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 66–88, 33 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1930 New York Yankees season

The 1930 New York Yankees season was their 28th season. The team finished with a record of 86–68, finishing 16 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Bob Shawkey. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1960 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to Baseball Hall of Fame for 1960 followed a system established after the 1956 election. The Veterans Committee was meeting only in odd-numbered years (until 1962). The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and, same as in 1958, it elected no one. For the third and final time the induction ceremonies in Cooperstown were canceled because there was no one to induct. It was also the last time until 2013 that there were no living inductees (all three members of that induction class, all deceased, were voted in by the Veterans Committee).

Hargrave (surname)

Hargrave and Hargraves are English surnames that may refer to:

Bert Hargrave (1917–1996), American politician

Bob Hargrave (1920–2014), former American footballer

Bubbles Hargrave (1892–1969), American baseball player

Christopher Hargrave (b. 1951), Australian cricketer

Daniel Hargraves (b. 1975), former Australian rules footballer

David A. Hargrave (1946–1986), American game designer and writer

Edward Hargraves (1816–1891), English born Australian gold prospector

Francis Hargrave (c.1741–1821), English abolitionist

Fred Hargraves (1884–1960), English footballer

John Hargrave (White Fox) (1894–1982), British leading figure in Scouting, Woodcraft Folk and Social Credit movement

John Hargrave (jurist) (1815–1885, Australian politician, jurist

Joseph James Hargrave (1841–1894), Canadian trader, author, and journalist

Lawrence Hargrave (1850–1915), Australian aviation pioneer

Letitia MacTavish Hargrave (1813–1854), Scottish writer

Margaret Packham Hargrave (b. 1941), Australian writerOrin Hargraves (b. 1953), American lexicographer

Pinky Hargrave (1896–1942), American baseball player

Richard Hargrave (1817–1905), Australian politician

Robert B. Hargraves (1928–2003), American geologist

Rudolph Hargrave (1925–2014), American jurist

Ryan Hargrave (b. 1981), Australian rules footballer

William Hargrave (d. 1751), Governor of Gibraltar

New Haven, Indiana

New Haven is a city in Adams, Jefferson, and St. Joseph townships, Allen County, Indiana, United States. It sits to the east of the city of Fort Wayne, the second largest city in Indiana, and is situated mostly along the southern banks of the Maumee River. The population was 15,709 as of the 2015 estimate.

Pinky Hargrave

William McKinley "Pinky" Hargrave (January 31, 1896 – October 3, 1942) was an American baseball catcher. He played professional baseball for 19 years from 1919 to 1937, including 10 years in Major League Baseball with the Washington Senators (1923–1925, 1930–1931), St. Louis Browns (1925–1926), Detroit Tigers (1928–1930), and Boston Braves (1932–1933).

St. Paul Saints (1901–60)

The St. Paul Saints were a baseball team who represented St. Paul, Minnesota in the Western League from 1894 to 1899 and the American Association from 1902 to 1960. They originated as the Sioux City franchise in the Western League which reorganized itself in November, 1893, with Ban Johnson as President. Johnson, a Cincinnati-based reporter, had been recommended by his friend Charles Comiskey, former major league star with the St. Louis Browns in the 1880s, who was then managing the Cincinnati Reds. After the 1894 season, when Comiskey's contract with the Reds was up, he decided to take his chances at ownership. He bought the Sioux City team and transferred it to St. Paul, where it enjoyed some success over the next 5 seasons. The 1920, 1922, and 1923 Saints were recognized as being among the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.In 1900 the Western League changed its name to the American League. It was still officially a minor league, a part of the National Agreement and an underling of the National League. The NL actually gave permission to the AL to put a team in Chicago, and on March 21, 1900, Comiskey moved his St. Paul club to the South Side, where they became the Chicago White Sox. In 1901, the AL declared itself a major league. In 1902, cast-aside Minneapolis joined St. Paul and other Midwestern cities to form a new minor league, the American Association.

Roy Campanella, Leo Durocher, Lefty Gomez and Duke Snider were among some future major leaguers who played for the Saints. Hall of Fame inductees who managed the St. Paul Saints were Walter Alston in 1948 and 1949, and Charles Comiskey from 1895 to 1899.

After decades of independence, the Saints became a farm club affiliate of the Chicago White Sox (1936–1942), the Brooklyn Dodgers (1944–1957), and the Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–1960). Their Minnesota rivals, the Minneapolis Millers, were during different periods the top minor league affiliate of the New York Giants and the Boston Red Sox.

The Saints played the first two years at the Dale and Aurora Grounds in St. Paul. The Saints also played from 1903 to 1909 at a downtown ballpark located on Robert Street between 12th and 13th Streets, and at the original Lexington Park at Lexington and University Avenue until 1913 when a fire damaged the structure. A new ballpark with a seating capacity of 10,000 was constructed in 1914 at University and Dunlap, which served as the home of the Saints through 1956. The Saints played their final four seasons at Midway Stadium, a modern ballpark located at 1000 North Snelling Avenue with a seating capacity of more than 13,000.

The two rival Twin Cities ball clubs played heated "streetcar double-headers" on holidays, playing one game in each city. Over the years 1902-60, the Saints compiled a 4719-4435 record, second only in winning percentage to the Millers' .524. The Saints won nine league pennants, and won the Little World Series championship in 1924, topping the Baltimore Orioles in ten games.

When the Minnesota Twins came to the Twin Cities in 1961, the Saints became the Omaha Dodgers.

A newer version of the team began play in 1993 and currently plays in the new American Association of Independent Professional Baseball.

Numerous famous baseball players, managers and coaches have appeared for the St. Paul Saints as players at some point in their careers. These players include:

Sandy Amoros (1951)

Ginger Beaumont (1911)

Joe Black (1951)

Ralph Branca (1945-1946)

Ben Chapman (1929)

Pat Collins (1925)

Roy Campanella (1948)

Chuck Dressen (1921-1924)

Leo Durocher (1927)

Lefty Gomez (1930)

Bubbles Hargrave (1918-1920, 1929)

Miller Huggins (1901-1903)

Mark Koenig (1921-1922, 1924-1925)

Clem Labine (1949-1952)

Gene Mauch (1946)

Chief Meyers (1908)

Cy Morgan (1906)

Johnny Murphy (1930-1931)

Duke Snider (1947)

Dick Williams (1954)

Don Zimmer (1953)

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