Bubba Paris

William "Bubba" Paris (born October 6, 1960) is a former professional American football offensive lineman who played for the San Francisco 49ers of the NFL from 1983 to 1990 and for the Indianapolis Colts and Detroit Lions in 1991. He was a member of three 49ers teams that won the Super Bowl. He won the Len Eshmont Award in 1987, as selected by his teammates on the 49ers.

Paris went to highschool at Desales in Louisville. He and his team didn't win state but many of the players were scouted. Now the team has multiple state championships.

Paris played college football at the University of Michigan, where he was named All-Big Ten, All-American and was also a (second team) Academic All-American.

Paris currently works as a motivational speaker throughout the United States. He resides in Tracy, California with wife Cynthia and son Trent. Paris has 2 sons, William III and Christian. In addition, he and his ex-wife Lynne have another 6 children: Four sons, named Wayne, David, Austin and Brandon, and twin daughters, Courtney and Ashley, who each currently play in the WNBA for the Tulsa Shock and Phoenix Mercury women's basketball teams respectively.

Bubba Paris
San Francisco Bubba Paris 13-10-2012 13-57-42
No. 77
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:October 6, 1960 (age 58)
Louisville, Kentucky
Career information
College:Michigan
NFL Draft:1982 / Round: 2 / Pick: 29
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:130
Games started:105
Fumble recoveries:3
Player stats at NFL.com

See also

External links

1979 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1979 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1979 Big Ten Conference football season. The team's head coach was Bo Schembechler. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium.

1980 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1980 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1980 college football season.

1980 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1980 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1980 Big Ten Conference football season. Coached by Bo Schembechler, Michigan won the Big Ten Conference championship with a record of 10–2 (8–0 in conference) and defeated the Washington Huskies in the 1981 Rose Bowl game, 23–6. After starting the season 1–2 with a narrow victory over Northwestern and losses to Notre Dame and South Carolina, the 1980 season looked like it would be disappointment. A quarterback controversy concerning the choice of Rich Hewlett to start the season over the popular John Wangler added to the early-season turmoil. However, the defense gathered strength over the course of the season, scored three consecutive shutouts, and did not allow a touchdown in the final 22 quarters of the season. The offense was led by All-Americans Anthony Carter at wide receiver and George Lilja at center. The Rose Bowl victory over Washington was Schembechler's first win in a bowl game, following seven bowl games losses. After falling out of the rankings for four weeks in the middle of the season, the 1980 Wolverines ended up being ranked #4 in both the AP and Coaches polls.

1981 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1981 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1981 college football season. Two players were unanimous first-team selections by the Associated Press (AP) media panel: Butch Woolfolk of Michigan Michigan and Tim Krumrie of Wisconsin. Three players missed being unanimous AP selections by one vote Anthony Carter of Michigan and Reggie Roby and Andre Tippett of Iowa.

1981 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1981 Big Ten Conference football season was the 86th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season.

The 1981 Big Ten co-champions were Iowa and Ohio State.

1981 College Football All-America Team

The 1981 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1981. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1981 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).Nine players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all four official selectors. They were:

Marcus Allen, running back for USC, who won the 1981 Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, and Walter Camp Award after becoming the first player to rush for more than 2,000 yards (2,427) in a season;

Anthony Carter, wider receiver for Michigan, consensus first-team All-American in both 1981 and 1982 who caught 50 passes for 952 yards during the 1981 season;

Sean Farrell, offensive guard who helped lead Penn State to a 10–2 record and a #3 ranking in the final AP Poll;

Jim McMahon, quarterback for BYU and winner of the 1981 Davey O'Brien Award and Sammy Baugh Trophy;

Dave Rimington, center for Nebraska, two-time winner of the Outland Trophy and the namesake of the Rimington Trophy, which is awarded annually to the nation's top collegiate center.

Kenneth Sims, defensive tackle who helped lead Texas to a 10–1–1 record and #2 ranking in the final AP Poll, and who became the #1 pick in the 1982 NFL Draft;

Billy Ray Smith, Jr., defensive end for Arkansas and who was a consensus first-team All-American in both 1981 and 1982;

Herschel Walker, running back for Georgia, a three-time consensus first-team All-American who finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1981 and won the award in 1982; and

Tim Wrightman, tight end for UCLA who caught 28 passes for 308 yards in 1981.Allen, Carter, McMahon, Rimington, Smith, and Walker have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

The 1981 Michigan Wolverines football team led the nation with five of its players, all on offense, receiving first-team honors from one or more of the selectors. In addition to Anthony Carter, Michigan's honorees were offensive tackles Ed Muransky and Bubba Paris, offensive guard Kurt Becker, and running back Butch Woolfolk.

1981 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1981 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1981 Big Ten Conference football season. The team's head coach was Bo Schembechler. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium.

Several Michigan players ranked among the Big Ten leaders, including the following:

Running back Butch Woolfolk led the conference with 1,459 rushing yards, 5.8 rushing yards per attempt, and 1,514 yards from scrimmage.

Quarterback Steve Smith led the conference with 12 rushing touchdowns and 27 total touchdowns, ranked fourth with a 125.7 passing efficiency rating, fifth with 674 rushing yards, and 2,335 total yards.

Wide receiver Anthony Carter led the conference with 11.5 yards per punt return and ranked second with 27.1 yards per kickoff return and eight receiving touchdowns, and third with 50 receptions and 952 receiving yards.

Placekicker Ali Haji-Sheikh ranked second in the conference with 35 extra points made, third with a 61.5 field goal percentage, and eighth with 59 points scored.

1981 Rose Bowl

The 1981 Rose Bowl was the 67th Rose Bowl game and was played on January 1, 1981, at the Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California. The game featured the Michigan Wolverines beating the Washington Huskies by a score of 23–6. The game marked the first time Michigan Coach Bo Schembechler won a bowl game after seven prior bowl game losses.

1985 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1985 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 36th year with the National Football League.

49ers running back Roger Craig became the first player in NFL history to record both 1,000 rushing yards and 1,000 receiving yards in the same season. Craig rushed for 1,050 yards, and had 1,016 receiving yards.This season was Jerry Rice's first season in the league.

1987 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1987 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 38th year with the National Football League. The 49ers won the division for the second consecutive season, and ended the season as the top seed in the NFC playoffs. The season ended with an upset loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs.

1991 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1991 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 42nd year with the National Football League. The franchise did not qualify for the postseason for the first time since the strike-shortened 1982 season. Joe Montana would miss the entire season with an elbow injury, paving the way for Steve Young to take over as the team's starting quarterback.

In Week 17, the 49ers found themselves not controlling their destiny. The Atlanta Falcons had already swept the 49ers in 2 very close games in the regular season, and therefore held the tiebreaker in the wild card. The New Orleans Saints had a 10–5 record entering the week, and defeated the Phoenix Cardinals, winning the division.

Ashley Paris

Ashley Paris (born September 21, 1987) is an American basketball player. She is the twin sister of Courtney Paris, who plays for the Seattle Storm. She has been nationally recognized for her basketball achievements at the University of Oklahoma. She was selected on April 9, 2009 with 22nd overall pick in the 2009 WNBA Draft by the Los Angeles Sparks.

Bubba

In American usage, "Bubba" is a term of endearment formed from "brother" and mainly given to boys.

The linguist Ian Hancock has described similarities between the African language Krio and Gullah, the creole language of blacks in the isolated Sea Islands of South Carolina, and points out that the Krio expression bohboh ("boy") appears in Gullah as buhbuh, which may account for the "Bubba" of the American South.Robert Ferguson notes in his book English Surnames that "Bubba" corresponds with the German Bube, "boy". This matches Saxon and Hibernian tradition.Because of its association with the southern part of the United States, "Bubba" is also often used outside the South as a pejorative to mean a person of low economic status and limited education. "Bubba" may also be taken to mean one who is a "good ol' boy". In the US Army and Marines, "Bubba" can mean a lay soldier, similar to "grunt", but with connotations of endearment instead of derision (e.g., "Can you make that device easier to work with, because every Bubba is going to have to use it?").

At times, it may be used as a term of endearment (or in an insulting sense) for a person, especially to a man, who is either overweight or has a seemingly powerful large body frame.In gun culture, "Bubba" is a term used for a person who permanently alters or modifies historic firearms, with no regard for its historical value.The word exists in other languages and carries similar meanings. "Bubba" is common in Australia and New Zealand as a noun to refer affectionately to a baby.

(In Yiddish, the word Bobe [with a vowel similar to a shortened version of the vowel of caught + beh] means "grandmother" and as a form of address, is often rendered by English speakers as "Bubba" or "Bubbie".)

Ed Muransky

Edward William "Ed" Muransky (born January 20, 1960) is a former professional American football offensive tackle who played for the Los Angeles Raiders of the National Football League (NFL) and Orlando Renegades of the United States Football League (USFL). He was a member of the Super Bowl XVIII Champion Raiders. Prior to this he was an All-American and Academic All-American athlete who played for the University of Michigan Wolverines during the 1979–1981 seasons.

After retiring from football he became a business partner and advisor to Edward J. DeBartolo Jr., former San Francisco 49ers owner. Muransky testified in the March 2000 trial of Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards, mainly about what DeBartolo had confided to Muransky. DeBartolo was the only extortion victim who claimed to have been extorted directly by Edwards, but Muransky could not provide direct testimony about private meetings between DeBartolo and Edwards. Muransky has continued to pursue business interests even after the controversies about DeBartolo have waned.

Mason Cole

Mason Cole (born March 28, 1996) is an American football center for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Michigan.

Oklahoma Sooners women's basketball

The Oklahoma Sooners women's basketball team represents the University of Oklahoma and competes in the Big 12 Conference of NCAA Division I.

Paris (surname)

Paris is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Ashley Paris (born 1987), Women's National Basketball Association player

Aimé Paris (1798–1866), French music educator and stenographer

Barry Paris (born 1948), author

Blanca París de Oddone (1925-2008), Uruguayan historian

Bubba Paris (born 1960), American football player

Courtney Paris (born 1987), Women's National Basketball Association player

Dominik Paris (born 1989), Italian ski racer

Drew Paris (born 1988), Canadian ice hockey player

Elizabeth Crewson Paris, United States Tax Court judge

François-Edmond Pâris (1806–1893), French admiral

Gaston Paris (1839–1903), French writer and linguist

Jackie Paris (1926–2004), American jazz singer and guitarist

Jeff Paris (mathematician) (born 1944), British mathematician

Jeff Paris (musician), American vocalist, keyboardist and guitarist

Jerry Paris (1925–1986), American actor and Director

Joel Paris (born 1993), Australian cricket

John Paris, Jr., Canadian hockey coach

John Ayrton Paris (1785–1856), physician

Maria Antonia Paris (1813–1885), Catholic nun

Matthew Paris (1200–1259), English monk and historian

Pierre-Adrien Pâris (1745–1819), French architect

Ryan Paris (born 1953), Italian singer

Sarina Paris (born 1973), Canadian pop vocalist

Reverend Samuel Parris (1653-1720), minister at Salem during the Salem witch trials

Taylor Paris (born 1992), Canadian rugby player

Twila Paris (born 1958), female Christian singer

Wilbur de Paris (1900-1973), American jazz trombonist

William de Paris, English Member of Parliament

Giuseppe Paris, Italian National Olympic Gold Medal Gymnist

Rich Strenger

Richard Gene Strenger (born March 10, 1960) is a former All-Big Ten American football offensive tackle who played for the University of Michigan Wolverines (1980–1982) and Detroit Lions (1983–1987). He is now working as a lawyer in Lake Orion, Michigan.

Steve Wallace (American football)

Barron Steven Wallace (born December 27, 1964) is a former professional American football player. He played 12 seasons as an offensive tackle in the National Football League for the San Francisco 49ers and the Kansas City Chiefs. He has since been recognized as having helped revolutionize the position of left tackle. In May 2012, he was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame.

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