Bryant Young

Bryant Colby Young (born January 27, 1972) is a former American football defensive tackle for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). A first round draft pick out of University of Notre Dame, he played the defensive tackle position. He is currently the defensive line coach for the Atlanta Falcons. Young was nominated for the 2019 class of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[1]

Bryant Young
Atlanta Falcons
Position:Defensive line coach
Personal information
Born:January 27, 1972 (age 47)
Chicago Heights, Illinois
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:305 lb (138 kg)
Career information
High school:Chicago Heights (IL) Bloom
College:Notre Dame
NFL Draft:1994 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:89.5
Tackles:618
Games played:208
Player stats at NFL.com

College years

Young was a three-year starter for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team, lettering all 4 years from 1990 to 1993. As a senior, he was an All-American selection, and had 6.5 sacks and 67 tackles. As a junior, he was an Honorable Mention All-American selection and garnered 7.5 sacks. He graduated from Notre Dame in 1994 with a major in marketing

Professional career

He was drafted by the 49ers in the 1st round (7th overall) in the 1994 NFL Draft. Young Made Honorable Mention All-Pro by The Associated Press in 1995. Young had his finest statistical season in 1996 recording 84 tackles, 11.5 sacks, 4 passes defensed and 2 safeties, while earning his first trip to the Pro Bowl. In 1997, although Young's sack total dropped to just 4 on the season, he was still a dominant presence on the interior line, helping San Francisco finish first overall in the NFL in total defense that season. Despite his drop in statistical production, he was still widely considered by many to be the best all-around DT in the NFL, despite teammate DT Dana Stubblefield being named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year that same season. Young was leading the entire NFL at the DT position in sacks with 9.5 prior to his season-ending injury suffered on a Monday Night match up against the New York Giants in week 13 of the 1998 season. The injury to Young's leg was so severe that he needed a metal rod to be inserted in the broken leg. Despite Young's devastating injury coming late in the 1998 season, he came back fully recovered in time for the 1999 season and recorded over 70 tackles, 11 sacks and a safety which earned him his second Pro Bowl. Young also received the NFL Comeback Player of the Year Award for his fantastic play that same season. Bryant Young had 89.5 career sacks in his 14-year career with the 49ers, ranking him at 6th all-time in the NFL in career sacks for a player at the DT position, trailing only Trevor Pryce, Steve McMichael, Henry Thomas, and Hall of Famers John Randle and Warren Sapp. He also ranks 3rd on the teams all-time career sacks list placing him behind only DE Tommy Hart and DE Cedric Hardman. Bryant Young also owns the 49ers' franchise record for career safeties, with 3. Bryant Young is a member of the NFL's All-Decade Team of the 1990s. Young wore the number 97 his whole career since college. Young retired from the NFL following the 2007 season. Bryant Young is eligible to be voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in the year 2013. Young was named as one of the 127 Preliminary nominees for the Hall of Fame but was eliminated when the list was reduced to 27 Semi-Finalists in November 2012.

NFL statistics

Year Team Games Combined Tackles Tackles Assisted Tackles Sacks Forced Fumbles Fumble Recoveries Fumble Return Yards Interceptions Interception Return Yards Yards per Interception Return Longest Interception Return Interceptions Returned for Touchdown Passes Defended
1994 SF 16 44 42 2 6.0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
1995 SF 12 28 25 3 6.0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
1996 SF 16 75 60 15 11.5 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
1997 SF 12 45 39 6 4.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
1998 SF 12 53 42 11 9.5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
1999 SF 16 40 36 4 11.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
2000 SF 15 44 32 12 9.5 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2001 SF 16 37 31 6 3.5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2002 SF 16 35 28 7 2.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2003 SF 16 35 29 6 3.5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
2004 SF 16 46 36 10 3.0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2005 SF 13 36 32 4 8.0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
2006 SF 16 52 41 11 5.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
2007 SF 16 35 31 4 6.5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Career 208 605 504 101 89.5 11 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 29

[2]

Coaching career

On January 21, 2010, Young was hired as the Defensive Line Coach at San Jose State University.[3]

On January 14, 2011 Young was hired as the defensive line coach for the University of Florida Gators football team.[4] He re-joined defensive coordinator Dan Quinn, his former position coach with the 49ers. On April 10, 2013 Young abruptly resigned to spend more time with his family.[5]

References

  1. ^ https://ninerswire.usatoday.com/gallery/7-former-49ers-nominated-for-2019-pro-football-hall-of-fame-class/
  2. ^ "Bryant Young Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved April 30, 2014.
  3. ^ https://www.mercurynews.com/2010/01/21/san-jose-state-hires-bryant-young/
  4. ^ http://www.gatorsports.com/article/20110114/ARTICLES/110119666/1136?Title=Muschamp-fills-out-staff
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 15, 2013. Retrieved December 17, 2015.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

1993 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1993 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1993 college football season. The team was coached by Lou Holtz and played its home games at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana.

On November 13, Notre Dame played Florida State in a matchup of unbeatens. The winner of this game, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana, was certain to play #3 Nebraska (which would then move up to #2) in the Orange Bowl for the national championship.

The next week, they faced Boston College in one of the best games of the year, the Notre Dame offense piled up 427 yards of offense, scored 5 touchdowns, including 22 points in the last 11 minutes, but the game would forever be remembered on Boston College's last drive as their kicker David Gordon hit a 41-yard field goal as time expired to win it 41–39, ending Notre Dame's bid for a national title.

1996 All-Pro Team

The 1996 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1996. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1996 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 1996 the AP added a new position, that of "Fullback", a primarily blocking position.

1998 All-Pro Team

The 1998 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1998. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1998 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1998 Pro Bowl

The 1998 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1997 season. The game was played on February 1, 1998, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was AFC 29, NFC 24. Warren Moon of the Seattle Seahawks, invited to participate because of an injury to John Elway, was the game's MVP. The referee was Gary Lane. The halftime show was Montell Jordan.

1999 All-Pro Team

The 1999 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1999. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1999 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1999 Pro Bowl

The 1999 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1998 season. The game was played on February 7, 1999, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu. The final score was AFC 23, NFC 10. Keyshawn Johnson of the New York Jets and Ty Law of the New England Patriots were the game's MVPs. This game was also the last game in the career of Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway, and Detroit Lions Running back Barry Sanders. The referee was Dick Hantak.

1999 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1999 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 50th year with the National Football League. This would also be Steve Young's last season as he was forced to retire due to concussions.

San Francisco started the season with a 3–1 record, but Young suffered his season- and career-ending concussion against the Arizona Cardinals in Week 3. After defeating the Cardinals and the Tennessee Titans without Young, the 49ers went on to lose ten of the remaining eleven games of the season. It was the first time the team had missed the postseason since 1991, their second time missing the postseason in 17 seasons, and their first losing season (excluding the strike shortened 1982 season, as well as their first season without at least 10 wins) since 1980.

Statistics site Football Outsiders calculates that the 1999 49ers had the second-worst pass defense they had ever tracked.

2001 All-Pro Team

The 2001 All-Pro Team comprises the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2001. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2001 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2001 the AP did not have a separate “fullback” position. Also, in 2001, the AP returned to choosing two inside linebackers, rather than one.

2001 San Francisco 49ers season

The 2001 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise’s 55th season and 51st in the National Football League. The 49ers rebounded from two losing seasons in 1999 and 2000, achieving their first winning season under quarterback Jeff Garcia and returning to the playoffs. However, the 49ers failed to progress further and fell 25–15 to the Green Bay Packers in the Wildcard round. The Packers would go on to lose 45–17 to the eventual NFC Champion St. Louis Rams the following week, with Brett Favre’s six interceptions giving the 49ers’ conquerors no chance.

2002 Pro Bowl

The 2002 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2001 season. The game was played on February 9, 2002, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was AFC 38, NFC 30. Rich Gannon of the Oakland Raiders was the game's MVP.

2003 Pro Bowl

The 2003 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2002 season. The game was played on February 2, 2003, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final Score was AFC 45, NFC 23. Ricky Williams of the Miami Dolphins was the game's MVP.

Elmo's Christmas Countdown

Elmo's Christmas Countdown is a 2007 American television christmas film, featuring the characters from Sesame Street. It was first aired two days before Christmas Day of 2007. Starring Ben Stiller.

Elmopalooza

Elmopalooza! is a Sesame Street special that aired on ABC on February 20, 1998. It was taped in the middle of the 29th season of Sesame Street and featured songs by celebrity guests.

Jeff Stover

Jeff Stover is a retired defensive lineman for the San Francisco 49ers American football team during the 1980s.

National Football League Comeback Player of the Year Award

The National Football League Comeback Player of the Year Award refers to a number of awards that are given to a National Football League (NFL) player who has shown perseverance in overcoming adversity, in the form of not being in the NFL the previous year, a severe injury, or simply poor performance. The awards have been presented by several organizations, including the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Weekly/Pro Football Writers Association (PFW/PFWA), Sporting News, and United Press International (UPI).

Niobia Bryant

Niobia Bryant (born November 24 in Newark, New Jersey) is an African-American novelist of both romance and mainstream fiction. She also writes urban fiction as Meesha Mink and young adult fiction as Simone Bryant.

Sesame Street Stays Up Late!

Sesame Street Stays Up Late! is a 1993 Sesame Street New Year's Eve television special with guest appearances of characters from the international versions of Sesame Street. This special aired on December 29, 1993 on PBS. It was released on home video as Sesame Street Celebrates Around the World.

The Best of Kermit on Sesame Street

The Best of Kermit on Sesame Street is a 1998 direct-to-video special that featured Kermit and his career on Sesame Street.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.