Bruiser Kinard

Frank Manning "Bruiser" Kinard Sr. (October 23, 1914 – September 7, 1985) was an American football tackle and coach and university athletic administrator. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a charter member in 1951 and into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1971.

A native of Pelahatchie, Mississippi, he played college football for Ole Miss from 1935 to 1937. He was the first player from any Mississippi school to receive first-team All-American honors, receiving those honors in both 1936 and 1937.

Kinard was drafted by the Brooklyn Dodgers in the third round of the 1938 NFL Draft and played seven years in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dodgers/Tigers from 1938 to 1944. He was selected as a first-team All-Pro in six of his seven years in the NFL (1938, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, and 1944). After missing the 1945 NFL season due to wartime service in the United States Navy, he played two years in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) for the New York Yankees from 1946 to 1947 and was selected as a first-team All-AAFC player in 1946.

Kinard also served as an assistant coach for New York Yankees in 1947 and for the Ole Miss football program from 1948 to 1970, as Ole Miss' athletic director from 1971 to 1973, and as its assistant dean of student personnel from 1974 until 1978.

Bruiser Kinard
Frank Kinard
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:October 23, 1914
Pelahatchie, Mississippi
Died:September 7, 1985 (aged 70)
Jackson, Mississippi
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:216 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Jackson (MS) Central
College:Ole Miss
NFL Draft:1938 / Round: 3 / Pick: 18
Career history
As player:
As coach:
As administrator:
Career highlights and awards
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Kinard was born in Pelahatchie, Mississippi in 1914.[1] His father Major Henry Kinard and mother Pearl (Wooley) Kinard were both Mississippi natives.[2] His father worked variously as a farmer,[2] a laborer,[3] and the proprietor of a lunch room in Utica, Mississippi.[4]

Kinard began high school as a freshman at Rolling Fork High School and then played his sophomore through senior years at Central High School in Jackson, Mississippi.[5] The sheriff of Hinds County reportedly recruited Kinard, already an excellent football player, to move to Jackson and offered his father a job as a jailer to facilitate the move.[6] Kinard acquired the nickname "Bruiser" after tackling one of his teammates during a practice scrimmage at Central High School.[3][5] He was the president of the senior class, ranked in the top third of his class, and graduated in 1933.[3][7]

Kinard had four brothers and two sisters.[3] Two of his younger brothers, George Kinard and Billy Kinard, also played professional football.[1]

Football player

Ole Miss

Kinard attended the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss), lettered for the Ole Miss Rebels from 1935 to 1937 and served as co-captain of the 1937 Ole Miss squad. During his three years at Ole Miss, Kinard appeared in all 34 games and averaged 55 minutes per game.[8] During one season, he played all 60 minutes in nine games.[5]

With Kinard playing tackle, the 1936 Ole Miss team compiled a 9–3 record and played in the school's first bowl game, a 20–19 loss to Catholic University in the 1936 Orange Bowl.[9] During his junior and senior seasons, Ole Miss went 9–10–3,[9] but Kinard nevertheless received recognition as follows:

Kinard was an above average student at Ole Miss, president of the sophomore class, and a member of Omicron Delta Kappa.[3] He graduated from Ole Miss in 1938 with a bachelor of science degree in commerce.[3]

Brooklyn Dodgers/Tigers

Kinard was selected by the Brooklyn Dodgers in the third round (18th overall pick) of the 1938 NFL Draft.[1] He made $1,974 as a rookie, a sum that Kinard recalled "was a lot of money back then."[5] Even in 1938, Kinard was small for a lineman at 210 pounds, but he noted: "I had enough ability to offset my size. And my speed was a lot better than any of the linemen."[5] He was a two-way player known for making "crushing blocks" on offense and as a "smothering, dominant tackler" who made "stops all over the field" on defense.[20]

Joe Stydahar, a fellow Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee who played against Kinard, recalled: "The Brooklyn team used to have plays designed just for the blocking of Kinard. They'd get Frank out there against a defender and he'd just mow them down."[21]

Kinard spent seven seasons with the Dodgers from 1938 to 1944 and developed a reputation as one of the toughest and most durable players in the NFL. According to his Pro Football Hall of Fame biography, he "rarely needed a rest and near-60-minute performances were the rule, rather than the exception."[22] He appeared as a starter at tackle in every game for the Dodgers in 1938, 1939, 1941, 1942, 1943, and 1944. During his seven years in the NFL, he missed only two games,[1] those coming in the 1940 season after an opposing player stepped on his hand and gangrene threatened amputation of the hand.[21] Kinard was also a regular on the NFL's annual All-Pro teams receiving first-team recognition from one or more selectors in six of his seven years in the NFL: in 1938 from the Pro Football Writers Association (PFWA); in 1940 from the NFL, Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP), and International News Service (INS); in 1941 from the NFL and UP; in 1942 from the INS; and in 1943 and 1944 from the AP.[1] He received second-team All-Pro honors in 1939 from the NFL, UP, and PFWA.[1]

Although used principally as a tackle, Kinard scored 42 points for the Yankees, scoring touchdowns on a reception in 1943 and a fumble recovery in 1941, kicking a field goal in 1943, and converting 27 of 30 extra point kicks.[1]

With Jock Sutherland as head coach, the Dodgers ranked among the top teams in the NFL, finishing second in the NFL East with records of 8–3 in 1940 and 7–4 in 1941. Sutherland left the team in 1942, and the club dropped to 2–8 in 1943 and 0–10 in 1944.[23]

Navy/Fleet City

After the Dodgers winless 1944 season, Kinard enlisted in the United States Navy in April 1945. He served until March 1946.[24] Kinard and his brother George Kinard played at tackle and guard, respectively, for the Fleet City Navy football team based at Camp Shoemaker in Dublin, California.[25] Kinard was named to the All-Service football team selected by West Coast sports writers in December 1945.[26]

New York Yankees

In January 1946, Dan Topping, owner of the New York Yankees of the newly-formed All-America Football Conference (AAFC), signed the Kinard brothers and four others from the Navy's Fleet City football team.[27] Bruiser Kinard started all 14 games for Yankees in 1946,[1] helping the team to a 10–3–1 record, good for first place in the AAFC's East Division. The team then lost in the AAFC championship game to the 1946 Cleveland Browns.[28] At the end of the 1946 season, Kinard was selected by the AP, UP, and AAFC as a first-team All-AAFC player.[1]

Kinard returned to the Yankees in 1947 and appeared in all 14 games, but in only three as a starter.[1] Kinard was also an assistant coach for the Yankees during the 1947 season.[3] He announced his retirement as a player in January 1948 at age 33.[29]

Honors and awards

Kinard received numerous honors and awards for his accomplishments as a football player, notably including induction into the two major football halls of fame. He was inducted as a charter member into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951,[8] and in 1971 he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[30] Other significant awards and honors include:

  • In 1949, he was named to the All-America Board's all-time football team, receiving more votes than any other tackle.[31]
  • In 1950, the Mississipian, the Ole Miss campus newspaper selected Kinard as the greatest Ole Miss athlete of all time.[32]
  • In 1953, he was honored by Ole Miss with a "Bruiser Kinard Day" in celebration of Kinard's induction into the College Football Hall of Fame. The Governor of Mississippi also declared a "Frank M. (Bruiser) Kinard Day" throughout the State of Mississippi.[33]
  • In 1955, he was inducted into the Helms Athletic Foundation's Helms College Football Hall of Fame.[34]
  • In 1961, he was inducted as one of four charter members into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame (along with Edwin Hale, Dudy Noble, and Stanley L. Robinson).[35]
  • In 1969, as part of football's centennial celebration, the Football Writers Association of America selected an all-time All-America team covering the sport's modern era from 1920 to 1969. Kinard was selected at the tackle position.[36][37]
  • In 1986, Ole Miss inducted Kinard posthumously into the Ole Miss Athletic Hall of Fame and also named its men's athletic dormitory as Kinard Hall in his honor.[38][39]
  • In 1993, as part of Ole Miss' celebration of its first 100 years of football, the school named its Ole Miss Team of the Century. Kinard was included as a defensive lineman.[40]
  • In 1999, he was one of 83 college football players named to the Walter Camp Football Foundation's All-Century team.[41]

Coaching and administrative career

In February 1948, Kinard was hired as the line coach at Ole Miss under Johnny Vaught.[42] He remained on Vaught's staff for 21 years. During the 12-year span from 1952 to 1963, Ole Miss won six SEC championships and was ranked in the top 11 of the final AP Poll 10 times, including No. 2 finishes in 1959 and 1960 and a No. 3 finish in 1962.[9] Kinard had offers to become a head coach in the NFL for the Boston Patriots and New York Giants, but opted to stay at Ole Miss.[5]

Kinard also served as acting head coach at Ole Miss for the last half of the 1970 season after Vaught suffered a heart attack on October 20.[43][44] In six games under Kinard, the 1970 Rebels won three games and lost three, including losses to rivals Mississippi State and LSU and to Auburn in the 1971 Gator Bowl. However, Ole Miss credits the entire 1970 season to Vaught

In January 1971, Ole Miss hired Kinard as its athletic director and his younger brother Billy Kinard as its head football coach.[45] In 1971, the Kinards led the 1971 Ole Miss team to a 10–2 record and a No. 15 ranking in the final AP Poll. However, the team's fortunes declined in 1972 with a 5–5 record. In September 1973, after Ole Miss lost two of the first three games, the university fired Billy Kinard as head coach and relieved Bruiser of his duties as athletic director.[46]

Bruiser remained employed by Ole Miss and was appointed assistant dean of student personnel in June 1974.[47] He held that position until he retired in 1978.[5]

Family and later years

Kinard married Mildred Frances "Midge" Kirk (1915–2006) in 1933 while they were seniors in high school.[5][48] They had two sons, Frank Jr. and John.[49]

In 1982, Kinard and his wife moved from Oxford, Mississippi, to Jackson, Mississippi, where they lived until Kinard's death.[50][7] Kinard suffered from Alzheimer's disease that eventually resulted in the near total loss of his memory.[6] He died in 1985 at age 70 at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Jackson.[7][51] He was buried at Lakewood Memorial Park in Jackson.[52]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Bruiser Kinard". pro-football-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 3, 2017.
  2. ^ a b 1920 U.S. Census entry for Major H. Kinard and family. Son Frank M. was age 5 and born in Mississippi. Census Place: Martinsville, Copiah, Mississippi; Roll: T625_874; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 46. Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "Bruiser Kinard On Another A-A Team". The Clarion-Ledger. November 7, 1962. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ 1930 U.S. Census entry for Major H. Kinard and family. Son F. M. was age 15 and born in Mississippi. Census Place: Utica, Hinds, Mississippi; Roll: 1148; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0036; FHL microfilm: 2340883. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Jerry Potter (August 25, 1980). "The quiet life of a past legend". The Clarion-Ledger. pp. C1, C3 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b "Brusier Kinard: Former player, coach left his mark on Ole Miss' athletic program". The Ledger (Lakeland, Florida). September 14, 1985. p. 5D.
  7. ^ a b c "Ole Miss football great 'Bruiser' Kinard dies". The Clarion-Ledger. September 8, 1985. pp. 1A, 12A – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b "Bruiser Kinard". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  9. ^ a b c "Ole Miss Rebels School History". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  10. ^ a b ESPN College Football Encyclopedia. ESPN Books. 2005. p. 1169. ISBN 1401337031.
  11. ^ Davis J. Walsh (December 1, 1936). "Widseth Only Big 10 Man To Rate". The Hammond (IN) Times. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.(INS)
  12. ^ Kenneth Gregory (December 3, 1936). "L.S.U. Places Seven Men On All–Southeastern Elevens". The Daily Times-News. p. 8. Retrieved May 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. (AP)
  13. ^ Dayton Moore (December 1, 1936). "Representative Pick Made in Southeastern". The Anniston Star. p. 8. Archived from the original on May 27, 2015. Retrieved May 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. (UP)
  14. ^ Stuart Cameron (December 1, 1937). "(UP Sports Editor)". Oshkosh Daily Northwestern.(UP)
  15. ^ "INS All-America". The Minneapolis Star. December 1, 1937. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.(INS)
  16. ^ Harry Grayson (November 24, 1937). "NEA's All-American Football Squad". The Rhinelander (Wis.) Daily News. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com.(NEA)
  17. ^ "Collyer's All-American Places Herwig at Guard: Californian Moves Over for 'Wojie'". Middletown Times Herald. December 13, 1937.(Collyer's Eye)
  18. ^ "Versatility, Great Power Represented". The Monroe News-Star. December 3, 1937. p. 10. Retrieved May 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.(AP)
  19. ^ "Alabama Gets Three Places on S. E. Eleven". Anniston Star. November 30, 1937. p. 8. Retrieved June 11, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.(UP)
  20. ^ Neil Reynolds (2006). Pain Gang: Pro Football's Fifty Toughest Players. Potomac Books, Inc. p. 144. ISBN 1597970131.
  21. ^ a b "Where is he now? Frank (Bruiser) Kinard lived up to his nickname". The Miami News. November 19, 1983. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "Frank "Bruiser" Kinard". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  23. ^ "Brooklyn Tigers Franchise Encyclopedia". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  24. ^ Death record for Frank Kinard, 10/23/14–9/7/85, enlisted April 17, 1945, discharged March 17, 1946. U.S., Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010 [database on-line]. Original data: Beneficiary Identification Records Locator Subsystem (BIRLS) Death File. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
  25. ^ "Fleet City in Pro Tilt Today". Oakland Tribune. October 14, 1945. p. 24 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ Pursuer Hewitt (December 9, 1945). "Sports". The Clarion-Ledger. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Topping Signs Six Fleet City Grid Players". Los Angeles Times. January 7, 1946. p. II-7 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "1946 New York Yankees Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  29. ^ "Bruiser Kinard To Foresake Pro Football Ranks". Kingsport (TN) Times. January 12, 1948. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ Carl Walters (February 7, 1971). "Bruiser Kinard Is State's Only Pro Grid Hall of Fame Member". The Clarion-Ledger. p. C5 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Kinard All-Time All-American". Enterprise-Journal. November 25, 1949. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "Bruiser Kinard Is Rated 'Best Ole Miss Athlete Of All Time". McComb (MS) Enterprise Journal. March 21, 1950. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "Bruiser Kinard Day Slated For Vandy Game Saturday". The Clarion-Ledger. October 9, 1953. p. 3-2 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Dr. Byrd Named To Helms Grid Coaches Hall of Fame". Baltimore Sun. September 23, 1955. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Hall of Fame Has 4 Greats". The Clarion-Ledger. April 9, 1961. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Bruiser Kinard Given Top Honor As All-Time Gridders Selected". The Clarion-Ledger. September 18, 1969. p. D5 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Bruiser Kinard to be honored as all time great". The Delta Democrat-Times (Greenville, MS). September 24, 1969. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "UM names athletic dorm for Kinard; presents award". The Northside Sun (Jackson, MS). October 2, 1986. p. 7A – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Kinard Hall dedicated at Ole Miss". The Magee Courier. September 4, 1986. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "Team of the Century". The Clarion-Ledger. April 25, 1993. p. D1 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ "Ole Miss Notebook". The Times (Shreveport, LA). December 29, 1999. p. 4C – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ "Kinard Signs As Ole Miss Line Coach". The Clarion-Ledger. February 4, 1948. p. 2–2 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ "John Vaught suffers mild heart attack". Hattiesburg American. October 22, 1970. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  44. ^ "Ole Miss AD Lauds Coach". The Clarion-Ledger. January 22, 1971. p. 1C – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "It's Official – Billy Kinard Replaces Vaught at OM". The Clarion-Ledger. January 22, 1971. p. C1 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ "Ole Miss Replaces Kinard With Vaught". The Greenville (SC) News (AP story). September 26, 1973. p. 28 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ "Vaught". The Clarion-Ledger. June 26, 1974. p. 4C – via Newspapers.com.
  48. ^ "Bruiser Kinard On Collegiate All-Star Grid Squad: Ole Miss Tackle Is A Winner". The Clarion-Ledger. July 27, 1938. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ "Deaths: Frank M. Kinard". The Clarion-Ledger. September 9, 1985. p. 2B – via Newspapers.com.
  50. ^ "Mildred (Midge) Kinard". The Clarion-Ledger. November 6, 2006 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ "Bruiser Kinard Is Dead at 70; Headed Mississippi Sports". The New York Times. United Press International. September 9, 1985. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  52. ^ "Frank Manning "Bruiser" Kinard". Find-a-Grave.com. Retrieved October 3, 2017.

External links

1937 College Football All-America Team

The 1937 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1937. The ten selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1937 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, (9) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (10) the Sporting News (SN).

1938 All-Pro Team

The 1938 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1938 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the National Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; New York Giants tackle Ed Widseth; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Another two were selected for the first team by four selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN); Pittsburgh Pirates halfback Byron White (PFW, UP, INS, CE); and Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN). Five players were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (PFW, INS, CE); Philadelphia Eagles end Bill Hewitt (UP, CE, NYDN); Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (UP, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers guard Russ Letlow (PFW, INS, CE); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (UP, INS, NYDN).

1940 All-Pro Team

The 1940 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1940 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the so-called "official" All-Pro team selected by 92 sports writers who were members of the Pro Football Writers Association of American (PFW), the sports writers of the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald American.Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Three players were selected for the first team by all seven selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker; Brooklyn Dodgers tackle Bruiser Kinard; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Four others were designated for the first team by six selectors: Cleveland Rams fullback Johnny Drake; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Brooklyn Dodgers end Perry Schwartz; and New York Giants center Mel Hein. Another four players were selected by five of seven selectors: Detroit Lions halfback Byron White; Washington Redskins halfback Sammy Baugh; Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1941 All-Pro Team

The 1941 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1941 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the so-called "official" All-Pro team selected by a committee of professional football writers for the NFL (NFL), the sports writers of the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald American.Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were named to the first team by all six selectors: Green Bay Packers halfback Cecil Isbell; Chicago Bears halfback George McAfee; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann; and Chicago Bears center Bulldog Turner.

1942 All-Pro Team

The 1942 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players who were chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team for the 1942 football season. Teams were selected by, among others, the "official" All-Pro team announced by the NFL and selected by a committee of nine reporters (NFL), the Associated Press (AP), the International News Service (INS), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).

1943 All-Pro Team

The 1943 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players who were chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team for the 1943 football season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Pro Football Illustrated, the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald-American (CHA).

1944 All-Pro Team

The 1944 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players who were chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team for the 1944 football season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Pro Football Illustrated, and the New York Daily News (NYDN).

1946 All-Pro Team

The 1946 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players who were chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team for the 1946 football season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), Pro Football Illustrated, and the New York Daily News (NYDN). The AP selections included players from the National Football League (NFL) and All-America Football Conference; the UP, PFI, and NYDN selections were limited to players from the NFL.

Brooklyn Dodgers (NFL)

The Brooklyn Dodgers were an American football team that played in the National Football League from 1930 to 1943, and in 1944 as the Brooklyn Tigers. The team played its home games at Ebbets Field of the baseball National League's team, the Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1945, because of financial difficulties and the increasing scarcity of major league-level players because of the war-time defense requirements at the height of World War II, the team was merged with the Boston Yanks and were known as the Yanks for that season.

This old NFL franchise was not related to the earlier (second incarnation) American Football League II with a franchise that played as the Brooklyn Tigers for the first half of the 1936 season before moving to Rochester, New York and playing as the Rochester Tigers. Another NFL team that played in the Brooklyn borough was the Brooklyn Lions (which became the Brooklyn Horsemen after merging with a team from an earlier first incarnation AFL of the same name) in 1926.

In 1946, co-owner and partner Dan Topping (1912–1974) pulled the Tigers team out of the old NFL and placed it in the newly established rival professional league – the All-America Football Conference, which shortly lasted until 1949 until several stronger teams from the AAFC merged with and entered a reorganized NFL in 1950. It lasted until 1970 with the NFL-AFL (third) merger following the establishment of the first "Super Bowl" inter-league national championship game three years before with the old NFL champions playing the victors of the latest rival fourth incarnation of the American Football League IV, formed in 1960 (now the American Football Conference (AFC).

Ed Walker (American football)

Edgar Lee Walker (March 25, 1901 – June 16, 1972) was an American football player, coach of football and basketball, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) from 1930 to 1937, compiling a record of 38–38–8. Walker was also the head basketball coach at Ole Miss from 1930 to 1935, tallying a mark of 46–36.

Football Writers Association of America

The Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) is one of the organizations whose College Football All-America Team is recognized by the NCAA. The organization also selects the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year, the Bronko Nagurski Trophy winner, the Outland Trophy winner, the Grantland Rice Trophy winner, a freshman All-America team, and weekly defensive player of the week, as well as developing scholarship programs and surveys for better working conditions. Since 1954, the association has awarded the Grantland Rice Trophy to the college football team they choose to be the National Champion.

Harry Mehre

Harry J. Mehre (September 18, 1901 – September 27, 1978) was an American football and basketball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Georgia (1928–1937) and the University of Mississippi (1938–1945), compiling a career college football record of 98–60–7. Mehre also served as the head coach of the Minneapolis Marines of the NFL in 1923, tallying a mark of 4–5–2.

Mehre attended the University of Notre Dame and played center on both the football and basketball teams (serving as co-captain for the 1919–1920 basketball team and captain of the 1920–1921 team). He graduated in 1922 and played in that year and in 1923 with the Minneapolis Marines, also serving as head coach in 1923. Mehre was also a football line coach and head basketball coach at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota.

In 1924, Mehre came to the University of Georgia as an assistant coach under George Woodruff. Upon Woodruff's retirement, Mehre became head coach and compiled a 59–34–6 record over ten years. He also was Georgia's athletic director. After leaving Georgia, Mehre served as the head coach at the University of Mississippi from 1938 to 1945, compiling a 39–26–1 record there.

Mehre was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1971. He died in Atlanta in 1978. In 1986, Butts–Mehre Heritage Hall was dedicated on the University of Georgia campus in honor of Mehre and fellow Bulldogs coach Wally Butts.

John Shafer

John Shafer is a former American college athletics administrator. He served as athletic director at the University of Mississippi from 1998 to 2002, at Eastern Kentucky University from 2003 to 2004, and at Southeast Missouri State University from 2008 to 2011. Shafer attended college at Auburn University, where he played on the school's baseball team. Shafer announced his retirement from collegiate athletic administration on June 16, 2011.

Johnny Vaught

John Howard Vaught (May 6, 1909 – February 3, 2006) was an American college football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) from 1947 to 1970 and again in 1973.

Born in Olney, Texas, Vaught graduated as valedictorian from Polytechnic High School in Fort Worth, Texas and attended Texas Christian University (TCU), where he was an honor student and was named an All-American in 1932. Vaught served as a line coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill under head coach Raymond Wolf from 1936 until 1941. In 1942, Vaught served as an assistant coach with the North Carolina Pre-Flight School.After serving in World War II as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy, he took a job as an assistant coach at Ole Miss in 1946 under Harold Drew, and replaced Drew as head coach a year later. He did not take long to make an impact, taking a team that had finished 2–7 and leading it to the first conference title in school history. He led the Rebels to additional Southeastern Conference titles in 1954, 1955, 1960, 1962, and 1963. To date, Vaught is the only coach in Ole Miss history to win an SEC football championship. He also dominated the Egg Bowl rivalry with Mississippi State, going 19–2–4 against the Bulldogs.

His 1960 team finished 10–0–1 and was the only major-conference team to go undefeated on the field that year. As a result, it won a share of the national championship; it was awarded the Grantland Rice Award from the Football Writers Association of America after the bowl games. In those days, the wire services crowned their national champion before the bowl games. It is very likely that Ole Miss would have finished atop one poll, if not both, had they been taken after the bowl games as they are today. His 1962 team finished 10-0 and finished third in both polls; to date, it is the only undefeated and untied season in school history.

Vaught took Ole Miss to 18 bowl games, winning 10 times including five victories in the Sugar Bowl. Only two coaches held a winning record against Vaught: Paul "Bear" Bryant, with a record of 7–6–1 against Vaught, and Robert Neyland, with a record of 3–2.

Vaught suffered a mild heart attack on October 20, 1970. His longtime line coach, Bruiser Kinard, served as interim head coach for the remainder of the season, though Ole Miss credits the entire season to Vaught.

Vaught formally retired after the season. Billy Kinard, Bruiser's younger brother, succeeded him; he was appointed by his older brother, who had become athletic director. However, after a lackluster start to the 1973 season, Ole Miss fired Billy Kinaird and demoted Bruiser Kinaird. Vaught was named athletic director, and also served as interim head coach for the remainder of the 1973 season.Vaught's overall record at Ole Miss was 190–61–12. His 190 wins are far and away the most in school history. When Vaught arrived, Ole Miss ranked 9th in all-time SEC football standings. When he retired in 1970, Ole Miss had moved up to third, behind only Alabama and Tennessee. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1979. In 1982, Ole Miss honored Vaught by adding his name to Hemingway Stadium. On February 3, 2006, Vaught died at the age of 96 in Oxford, Mississippi.

New York Yankees (AAFC)

The New York Yankees were a professional American football team that played in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) from 1946 to 1949. The team played in Yankee Stadium in the Bronx and often played in front of sold-out crowds. They were owned by Dan Topping, who transferred the team from the NFL Brooklyn Dodgers, retaining many of the same players. The team's coach was Ray Flaherty, who had coached the Washington Redskins in the early 1940s.

The Yankees appeared in the 1946 AAFC championship game, but lost to the Cleveland Browns by a score of 14–9. The same two teams appeared in the championship game the following year, with the Browns winning again 14–3.

Before the 1949 season, the Brooklyn Dodgers football team folded and merged into the Yankees, which became the Brooklyn-New York Yankees, but this was the final season of the AAFC, which was then absorbed by the NFL. The Yankees players were divided between the New York Giants and New York Bulldogs, who played as the New York Yanks starting in 1950.

Ole Miss Rebels football

The Ole Miss Rebels football program represents the University of Mississippi, also known as "Ole Miss.” The Rebels compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The football history of Ole Miss includes the formation of the first football team in the state and the 26th team on the list of college football's all-time winning programs. The Rebels posted their 600th win on September 27, 2008, when they defeated the Florida Gators 31–30.Throughout the 115-year history of Ole Miss football, the Rebels have won six Southeastern Conference titles (1947, 1954, 1955, 1960, 1962, and 1963) and claim three national titles (1959, 1960, 1962). The team is currently coached by Matt Luke, who was interim head coach in 2017 and led the Rebels to a 6-6 record, including an Egg Bowl win over Mississippi State. In 2017, the Rebels announced a one-year self-imposed bowl-ban after it was revealed the program violated NCAA recruitment rules under former coach Hugh Freeze. The NCAA later extended the postseason ban for an additional year and placed the program on probation until 2020.

Pete Boone

Pete Boone is the former athletics director (AD) for the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss).

Ross Bjork

Carl "Ross" Bjork (born October 22, 1972) is the current athletics director for the University of Mississippi. He has previously served as the director of athletics for Western Kentucky University where he was the youngest among all of the 120 NCAA FBS when hired. He has also previously worked for the University of Miami, UCLA, and the University of Missouri.Bjork received his bachelor's degree from Emporia State University in 1995 and his master's degree from Western Illinois University in 1996. Bjork is married to Sonja and has two sons.

Quarterbacks
Running backs
Wide receivers /
ends
Tight ends
Offensive
linemen
Pre-modern era
two-way players
Defensive
linemen
Linebackers
Defensive backs
Placekickers
and punters
Coaches
Contributors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.