Bruce Wilkerson

Bruce Alan Wilkerson (born July 28, 1964) is a former American football player who played tackle for three NFL teams from 1987 to 1997. He started in Super Bowl XXXI for the Green Bay Packers. Wilkerson played college football at the University of Tennessee, where he was twice named All-SEC.

Wilkerson attended Loudon High School in Loudon, Tennessee, where he played both offensive tackle and defensive tackle, and was named to the all-state team his senior year.[1] He signed with Tennessee in 1982, though he was a redshirt his first year.

Working with Tennessee offensive line coach (and future head coach) Phillip Fulmer, Wilkerson secured a spot in the second string during the 1983 season, backing up veteran tackle Curt Singer.[2] By his sophomore season in 1984, he was a starter, anchoring a line that helped running back Johnnie Jones set career rushing records.[3] Wilkerson was an integral member of the 1985 "Sugar Vols" squad, and was named All-SEC and 2nd-team All-American at the end of the season.[4] In the 1986 Sugar Bowl, Wilkerson's block on Miami nose guard Jerome Brown helped spring Jeff Powell's 60-yard touchdown run.[5]

After an All-SEC senior year in 1986, Wilkerson was drafted by the Los Angeles Raiders in the second round of the 1987 NFL Draft. He spent his first eight seasons with the Raiders, and was a starter throughout the early 1990s. He was on the inaugural roster of the Jacksonville Jaguars in 1995, and closed out his career with Green Bay.

Bruce Wilkerson
No. 68, 64
Position:Offensive lineman
Personal information
Born:July 28, 1964 (age 54)
Loudon, Tennessee
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:310 lb (141 kg)
Career information
High school:Loudon (TN)
College:Tennessee
NFL Draft:1987 / Round: 2 / Pick: 52
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • All-SEC (1985)
  • All-SEC (1986)
Career NFL statistics
Games Played:147
Games Started:94
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ "1982 Tennessee Signees," 1982 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide (University of Tennessee, 1982), p. 62.
  2. ^ "1983 Squad," 1983 Tennessee Volunteers Football Program (University of Tennessee, 1983), p. 59.
  3. ^ "1985 Squad," 1985 Tennessee Volunteers Football Program (University of Tennessee, 1985), pp. 74, 112-113.
  4. ^ "1986 Squad," 1986 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide (University of Tennessee, 1986), p. 79.
  5. ^ Keith Jackson and Frank Broyles, game commentary, 1986 Sugar Bowl television broadcast, ABC Sports, January 1, 1986.

External links

1985 All-SEC football team

The 1985 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1985 Tennessee Volunteers football team

The 1985 Tennessee Volunteers football team (variously "Tennessee", "UT" or the "Vols") represented the University of Tennessee in the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. Playing as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the team was led by head coach Johnny Majors, in his ninth year, and played their home games at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. They finished the season with a record of nine wins, one loss and two ties (9–1–2 overall, 5–1 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a victory over Miami in the 1986 Sugar Bowl. The Volunteers offense scored 325 points while the defense allowed 140 points. At season's end, the Volunteers ranked fourth in both the AP Poll and the Coaches' Poll.

Known to fans as the Sugar Vols for their Sugar Bowl victory, the 1985 squad is frequently recalled as one of the most memorable and beloved teams in UT football history, and has been credited with restoring the program to national prominence. The team's SEC Championship was the first for the program in 16 years, and its top ten ranking was the program's first in 13 years.After a strong start to the season, Tennessee suffered a major setback when star quarterback and Heisman Trophy candidate Tony Robinson suffered a season-ending knee injury in a close game against Alabama. The team rallied to finish 6-0-1, however, led by backup quarterback Daryl Dickey, and a defense– nicknamed the "Orange Crush"– that allowed just four touchdowns in its final seven games. The 1986 Sugar Bowl has been ranked among the team's ten greatest victories of all time.

1986 All-SEC football team

The 1986 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1986 Tennessee Volunteers football team

The 1986 Tennessee Volunteers football team (variously "Tennessee" or the "Vols") represented the University of Tennessee in the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. Playing as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the team was led by head coach Johnny Majors, in his tenth year, and played their home games at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. They finished the season with a record of seven wins and five losses (7–5 overall, 3–3 in the SEC) and with a victory over Minnesota in the Liberty Bowl. The Volunteers offense scored 293 points while the defense allowed 249 points.

1987 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1987 Los Angeles Raiders season was the franchise's strike-shotened 28th season overall, and the franchise's 18th season in the National Football League. They finished with a disappointing record of 5–10 (the team's worst finish since Al Davis arrived in 1963). It was only the sixth losing season in franchise history.

1987 NFL Draft

The 1987 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 28–29, 1987, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

1989 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1989 Los Angeles Raiders season was the franchise's 30th season overall, and the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League. Art Shell replaced Mike Shanahan, and in the process became the first black head coach in the NFL since Fritz Pollard coached the Akron Pros in 1921. The club finished with an 8–8 record. In preseason against the Houston Oilers, the Raiders played their first game in Oakland since moving to Los Angeles in 1982, before eventually moving back to Oakland in 1995.

1991 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1991 Los Angeles Raiders season was their 32nd in the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to improve upon their previous season's output of 12–4, winning only nine games. After a 9–4 start, the team lost its last three games, but did qualify for the playoffs for the second straight season. The Raiders were inconsistent offensively, with struggling quarterback Jay Schroeder eventually benched in favor of rookie Todd Marinovich. It was notable that future Hall of Famer Marcus Allen's role was restricted mainly to backing up newly acquired Roger Craig, and future All-Pro Tim Brown also played mostly as a reserve, starting only one game. The loss of Bo Jackson to a career-ending injury also clearly had an impact. A solid defense was led by Howie Long, Greg Townsend (13 sacks) and Ronnie Lott (8 interceptions).

1992 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1992 Los Angeles Raiders season was their 33rd in the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to improve upon their previous season's output of 9–7, winning only seven games. This was the first time in three seasons the team failed to qualify for the playoffs.

1994 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1994 Los Angeles Raiders season was the franchise's 35th season overall, and the franchise's 25th season in the National Football League. They failed to improve on their 10-6 record from 1993 and missed the playoffs. The Raiders would return to their original home in Oakland the following season.

1995 Jacksonville Jaguars season

The 1995 Jacksonville Jaguars season was the franchise's 1st season in the National Football League and the 1st under head coach Tom Coughlin. The Jaguars finished with a 4-12 in their debut season and not making the playoffs. However, they ended the saeon on a high note defeating the Cleveland Browns 24-21 on December 24 of that year.

1996 Green Bay Packers season

The 1996 Green Bay Packers season was their 78th season overall and their 76th in the National Football League, which culminated with the franchise winning its third Super Bowl and league-record 12th NFL Championship. The Packers posted a league-best 13–3 regular season won-loss record, going 8–0 at home and 5–3 on the road. It was the first time since 1962 that the club went undefeated at home. Additionally, the Packers had the NFL's highest-scoring offense (456) and allowed the fewest points on defense (210). Green Bay was the first team to accomplish both feats in the same season since the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. They finished the season with the number one ranked offense, defense, and special teams. They also set a then NFL record for the fewest touchdowns allowed in a 16-game season, with 19. The Packers also allowed the fewest yards in the NFL and set a record for punt return yardage. Brett Favre won his second straight MVP award while also throwing for a career-high and league leading 39 touchdown passes.

In the postseason, the Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers in the divisional round and the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game. Green Bay beat the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI to win their third Super Bowl and twelfth NFL Championship.In 2007, the 1996 Packers were ranked as the 16th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. The 1996 Packers were ranked 6th-greatest Super Bowl team of all-time by a similar panel done by ESPN and released in 2007. As of 2019, the Packers are the only team since the implementation of the salary cap to score the most points and allow the fewest in the regular season.

Don Mosebar

Donald Howard Mosebar (born September 11, 1961) is a former American college and professional football player who was a Center in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. He played college football for the University of Southern California, and earned All-American honors. Mosebar was selected in the first round of the 1983 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the NFL's Los Angeles Raiders.

Independent American Party of Nevada

The Independent American Party of Nevada (IAPN) is the former Nevada affiliate of the Constitution Party of the United States. It is not to be confused with the national party of the same name. It was founded in 1967. It was one of four Constitution state parties that had not changed its name to "Constitution Party" since the national party adopted that name until it was later discontinued. As the Nevada party's name predated the national Constitution Party by decades and also for personal reasons, the Nevada membership did not desire to change the name.

In addition to the party's successes in the 2006 and the 2010 elections, the Nevada IAP sent five unpaid lobbyists to every Nevada state legislative session, which convened every two years in February.

John Bruhin

John Glenn Bruhin (born December 9, 1964) is a former American football guard who played four seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League. Bruhin was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the fourth round of the 1988 NFL Draft. He played college football at the University of Tennessee and high school football at Powell High School in Powell, Tennessee.After redshirting in 1983 at Tennessee, Bruhin spent most of the 1984 season as a reserve behind All-American Bill Mayo. By the 1985 season, he was a starter on a line that featured future NFL players Bruce Wilkerson, Harry Galbreath, and David Douglas, and delivered a "stellar blocking performance" in the 1986 Sugar Bowl. In spite of a knee injury, he appeared in 11 games in 1986, and played in all 12 games in 1987.Bruhin appeared in all sixteen games for Tampa Bay during his rookie season in 1988. He had worked his way into the starting lineup by 1989, but suffered a knee injury in the seventh game of the season, and missed several games. He started several games for the Bucs during the 1990 season, alternating at left guard with Tom McHale. He continued alternating the starting spot with right guard Ian Beckles and Tom McHale during the 1991 season. Bruhin signed with the Philadelphia Eagles in March 1992, but was waived just before the start of the season.

List of Jacksonville Jaguars players

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the Jacksonville Jaguars NFL franchise.

List of Tennessee Volunteers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Tennessee Volunteers selected in the NFL Draft.

Raleigh McKenzie

Raleigh McKenzie (born February 8, 1963) is an American football college scout for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League, where he worked for his twin brother, general manager Reggie McKenzie until the latter's firing in December 2018. During a 16-year football career, he played for four different teams as an offensive lineman. Raleigh played guard for the Washington Redskins from 1985 to 1994. Nicknamed "Rallo," he played primarily as a reserve during his first season before becoming a vital starter due to injury. He started in each game after that at any of the five positions on the offensive line, but his speciality was center. He played on two Super Bowl Champion teams in 1987 and 1991. He was named to the All-NFL Team in 1991. He also played for the Philadelphia Eagles, San Diego Chargers, and Green Bay Packers.

McKenzie attended Austin-East High School in Knoxville, where, like his brother, he played both at linebacker and on the offensive line (Raiders Director of Player Personnel Joey Clinkscales was among their teammates). Raleigh was named the 11th-best recruit in Tennessee by the Knoxville News Sentinel following his senior year.The McKenzie brothers played for the University of Tennessee from 1981 to 1984. Both played linebacker as freshmen, but Raleigh switched to center during his sophomore season. Playing alongside All-American Bill Mayo and future NFL lineman Bruce Wilkerson, McKenzie anchored a line that helped running back Johnnie Jones set school records for rushing in 1984. McKenzie's position coach was future Vol head coach Phillip Fulmer. In September 2011, the McKenzie brothers were honored as UT "Legends of the Game" during the Vols' game against Cincinnati.McKenzie joined the Redskins for training camp in 2001 assisting the personnel department. He also ran summer football camp. Before joining his brother in Oakland, Raleigh was an assistant football coach at Herndon High School in Virginia.Both brothers are members of Omega Psi Phi fraternity.

Steve Wright (American football, born 1959)

Stephen Hough Wright (born April 8, 1959) is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Indianapolis Colts and Los Angeles Raiders. He was also a member of the Oakland Invaders of the United States Football League. He played college football at Northern Iowa and then played ten professional seasons for four teams from 1981–1992. He also appeared on Survivor: Redemption Island where he placed tenth and became the third jury member.

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