Brooks Robinson

Brooks Calbert Robinson Jr. (born May 18, 1937) is an American former professional baseball player.[1][2] He played his entire 23-year major league career for the Baltimore Orioles (1955–1977), which still stands as the record for the longest career spent with a single team in major league history.[1] He batted and threw right-handed, though he was a natural left-hander.[3] Nicknamed "The Human Vacuum Cleaner" or "Mr. Hoover",[4] he is considered one of the greatest defensive third basemen in major league history.[5] He won 16 consecutive Gold Glove Awards during his career,[6] tied with pitcher Jim Kaat for the second-most all-time for any player at any position. Robinson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983.[4]

Brooks Robinson
Brooks Robinson 1955
Robinson in 1955
Third baseman
Born: May 18, 1937 (age 82)
Little Rock, Arkansas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 17, 1955, for the Baltimore Orioles
Last MLB appearance
August 13, 1977, for the Baltimore Orioles
MLB statistics
Batting average.267
Hits2,848
Home runs268
Runs batted in1,357
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1983
Vote91.98% (first ballot)

Early life

Robinson was born in Little Rock, Arkansas, to Brooks Calbert and Ethel Mae (née Denker) Robinson.[7] His father worked for Colonial Bakery in Little Rock and later became a captain with the Little Rock Fire Department.[8] His mother worked for Sears Roebuck & Company and then in the controller's office at the state capitol.[9] His father played second base for a semi-pro team.[10] Young Brooks Robinson Jr., delivered the Arkansas Gazette on his bicycle[11] and also operated the scoreboard and sold soft drinks at Lamar Porter Field.[12]

After he graduated from Little Rock High School on May 27, 1955, where he was scouted for the Arkansas Razorbacks baseball program in Fayetteville,[13][14] he played in South America in 1955 and in Cuba in 1957. In the offseason of 1956–1957, and then again in 1958, he attended two winter semesters at Little Rock University, majoring in business. He went into the army in 1959,[15] joining the Arkansas National Guard right before he was to be drafted into the United States Army.[14]

Career

Robinson was signed by the Orioles as an amateur free agent in 1955.[16] He made his first appearance on September 17, 1955 at Memorial Stadium against the Washington Senators, batting 6th in the lineup. He went 2-for-4 with an RBI, singling in the 4th off Chuck Stobbs for his first hit while driving in a run on a single in the eighth inning in the 3-1 win. [17] In 1964, Robinson had his best season offensively, hitting for a .318 batting average with 28 home runs and leading the league with 118 runs batted in, winning the American League Most Valuable Player Award.[1][18] In the American League MVP voting, he received 18 of the 20 first-place votes, with Mickey Mantle finishing second.[18] In 1966, he was voted the All-Star Game Most Valuable Player, and finished second to teammate Frank Robinson in the American League Most Valuable Player Award voting, as the Orioles went on to win the 1966 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.[19][20][21][22]

In the 1970 post-season, Robinson hit for a .583 batting average in the 1970 American League Championship Series against the Minnesota Twins.[23] In the 1970 World Series against the Cincinnati Reds, Robinson had a .429 batting average with 2 home runs;[23] however, it was his defensive prowess at third base that stood out, making several impressive plays during the series that robbed the Reds of apparent base hits.[24][25] His performance won him the World Series MVP Award presented by SPORT,[19] as well as the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year.[26] After the 1970 World Series, Cincinnati Reds manager Sparky Anderson quipped, "I'm beginning to see Brooks in my sleep. If I dropped this paper plate, he'd pick it up on one hop and throw me out at first."[27]

In his playing career, Robinson was selected for the All-Star team in 15 consecutive years (1960-74) and played in four World Series.[1] He compiled a .267 career batting average with 2,848 hits, 268 home runs and 1357 runs batted in.[1] Robinson led the American League in fielding percentage a record 11 times, and at the time of his retirement, his .971 career fielding average was the highest ever for a third baseman.[28] His totals of 2870 games played at third base, 2697 career putouts, 6205 career assists, 8902 career total chances and 618 double plays were records for third basemen at the time of his retirement.[28] Robinson's 23 seasons with one team set a new major league record, since tied by Carl Yastrzemski. Only Yastrzemski (3308), Hank Aaron (3076) and Stan Musial (3026) played more games for one franchise.[28] Robinson, a slow baserunner, also hit into four triple plays during his career, a major league record. He commented, "I wouldn't mind seeing someone erase my record of hitting into four triple plays."[29] He is the first player to start two triple plays in one season, as he did in 1973. Robinson made his final batting appearance on August 5, 1977 at Anaheim Stadium, pinch hitting for Mark Belanger in the top of the eighth inning. He lined out in his one appearance before being replaced by Kiko Garcia. [30] Robinson made his last appearance in the majors eight days later at Memorial Stadium against the Oakland Athletics. He entered as a pinch hitter for Al Bumbry, only to be pinch hit for by Tony Muser. [31]

Retirement

When the Orioles started their team Hall of Fame, Brooks and Frank Robinson were the first two men inducted. Following his retirement as a player, Brooks began a successful career as a color commentator for the Orioles' television broadcasts. In 1982, local television WMAR's on-air news team in Baltimore, Maryland went on strike and picketed the WMAR headquarters for the two months approaching the baseball season. When Robinson refused to cross the picket line, WMAR management reopened the negotiations and the strike ended the next day.

Honors

Brooks Robinson 1963
Robinson in 1963

At the conclusion of his final season in 1977, his jersey number 5 was retired by the Orioles.[32] Robinson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983, one of only 16 players to have been honored on the first ballot (not including the five charter members chosen in the first election in 1936).[4] Considered among the greatest all-time Orioles, Robinson and the man usually considered the greatest Baltimore Colts football player, Johnny Unitas, had plaques in their honor in the lobby of Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. When the Orioles played their last game there on October 6, 1991, Robinson and Unitas were invited to throw out the ceremonial first balls. (Unitas threw a football.) After the conclusion of the game, 119 former Oriole players took the field in the uniforms of their time and stood at their old positions on the field. Robinson was chosen to be the first player to come out.[33]

In 1999, he ranked Number 80 on The Sporting News list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team.[34][35]

A longtime supporter of Scouting, Robinson served for many years on the executive board of the Baltimore Area Council, Boy Scouts of America and is a recipient of the Silver Beaver Award. On December 5, 2006 he was recognized for his accomplishments on and off of the field when he received the Bobby Bragan Youth Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award. On May 16, 2007, Radio Tower Drive, a road in Pikesville, Maryland, was renamed Brooks Robinson Drive in honor of Robinson's 70th birthday.[36]

On July 2, 2008, the minor league team in York, Pennsylvania, where Robinson got his start, held a ceremony honoring him for being voted as a member on the All-Time Rawlings Gold Glove Team.[37] The award was created by Rawlings and voted by fans to celebrate the golden anniversary of the award.

On October 22, 2011, a statue was unveiled on Washington Boulevard in downtown Baltimore depicting Robinson preparing to throw out a runner at first base. Robinson was present for the unveiling of the statue and commented that it "gave him more hair than he deserved". The statue weighs more than 1,500 pounds, is dark gray in color with the exception of a gold colored fielders's baseball glove, and is located about 300 yards away from the Camden Yards statue of Babe Ruth.[38]

On September 29, 2012, the Orioles unveiled a larger-than-life bronze sculpture of Robinson at Oriole Park at Camden Yards as part of the Orioles Legends Celebration Series during the 20th anniversary of the ballpark.[39][40] The unveiling had been previously scheduled to be on May 12, 2012, but had to be rescheduled due to Brooks still slowly recovering after falling off a stage on January 27, 2012.[41]

In 2015, Robinson was selected as one of the Orioles Franchise-Four, recognizing the four greatest players in Orioles history, along with Jim Palmer, Frank Robinson and Cal Ripken Jr.

Other

Brooks Robinson 2010
Robinson in 2010

Robinson serves as president of the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association, an organization that assists players and fans to interact off the field. MLB legends Bob Boone, George Brett, Robin Yount, Rusty Staub, Carl Erskine and Al Kaline preside as vice presidents. The organization assists former major league players through its wholly owned for-profit organizations MLAM (Major League Alumni Marketing), and MLAS (Major League Alumni Services). MLAM's goals include implementing a player pool and gaining compensation for former players through appearances and endorsements while protecting the names and likenesses of former players from unauthorized uses.

Robinson is one of the investors in the Opening Day Partners group, which owns four teams in the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball. The group named Brooks Robinson Plaza at the entrance of PeoplesBank Park in York, Pennsylvania, in his honor. In the 1970s, Robinson published an autobiography, Third Base is My Home.

He met his future wife, Constance Louise "Connie" Butcher,[7] on an Orioles team flight from Kansas City to Boston in July 1959, where she was working as a flight attendant for United Airlines. He was so smitten with her that he kept ordering iced teas from her. Some of his teammates encouraged him to go talk to her.[8] After drinking his third glass, he returned it to her in the galley. There he told her: "I want to tell you something. If any of these guys, the Baltimore Orioles, ask you for a date, tell 'em you don't date married men. Understand? I'm the only single guy on the team." Before the plane landed in Boston the two had made a date to go out. He was not the only bachelor on the flight.[42] Brooks and Constance were married in her hometown of Windsor, Ontario, Canada on October 8, 1960.[43] Raised a Methodist, in 1970 Robinson converted to Catholicism, his wife's faith.[44][45]

On March 31, 2011, Robinson was admitted to Greater Baltimore Medical Center for emergency surgery after he developed an infection and fever.[46] In the two weeks he spent in the hospital, he received an outpouring of letters and well-wishes from fans around the country.[47] He was also successfully treated for prostate cancer in 2009.

In April 2014 it was reported that Robinson was seeking a multimillion-dollar settlement with the Seminole Indian tribe related to injuries he suffered after a 2012 fall from a stage at the Hard Rock casino.[48]

BrooksRobinson5
Brooks Robinson's number 5 was retired by the Baltimore Orioles in 1977.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Brooks Robinson. – Baseball-Reference.com.
  2. ^ Brooks Robinson. – Baseball Almanac.
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ a b c Brooks Robinson. – National Baseball Hall of Fame.
  5. ^ Kuenster, Bob (September 1994). "All-Time Best Third Basemen Starred as Hitters, Fielders". Baseball Digest. 53 (9). ISSN 0005-609X.
  6. ^ List of Gold Glove Award winners. – Baseball-Reference.com.
  7. ^ a b Moritz, Charles (1974). Current Biography Yearbook: 1973. H. W. Wilson Company. p. 363.
  8. ^ a b Hunt, Jim (May 1, 1965). "Brooks Robinson: The Nice Guy Who Finishes First". The Montreal Gazette. pp. 21–22.
  9. ^ Staples, Billy & Rich Herschlag (2007). "Brooks Robinson: Big Talent from Little Rock". Before the Glory: 20 Baseball Heroes Talk about Growing Up and Turning Hard Times Into Home Runs. HCI. p. 395. ISBN 978-0-7573-0626-6.
  10. ^ Staples & Herschlag. – p.396.
  11. ^ Staples & Herschlag. – p.398.
  12. ^ Staples & Herschlag. – p.400.
  13. ^ Wolf, Rick (1991). Brooks Robinson. Chelsea House Publishers. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-7910-1186-7.
  14. ^ a b Staples & Herschlag. – p.402.
  15. ^ Peary, Danny (1994). We played the game: 65 players remember baseball's greatest era, 1947–1964. Hyperion. p. 484. ISBN 0-7868-6008-1.
  16. ^ Brooks Robinson: Trades and Transactions. – Baseball Almanac.
  17. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/BAL/BAL195509170.shtml
  18. ^ a b 1964 American League Most Valuable Player Award voting results. – Baseball-Reference.com.
  19. ^ a b Post-season Awards. – Baseball-Reference.com.
  20. ^ 1966 All Star Game. – Baseball Almanac.
  21. ^ 1966 American League Most Valuable Player Award voting results. – Baseball-Reference.com.
  22. ^ 1966 World Series. – Baseball-Reference.com.
  23. ^ a b Brooks Robinson post-season statistics. – Baseball-Reference.com.
  24. ^ Jayson, Stark. "Top 10 Plays of All Time". ESPN.
  25. ^ Condon, David (January 1971). "The Incomparable Brooks Robinson". Baseball Digest. 30 (1). ISSN 0005-609X.
  26. ^ "Brooks Robinson at hickok sports". Archived from the original on 2010-01-11. Retrieved 2009-12-04.
  27. ^ Quotes about Brooks Robinson. – Baseball Almanac.
  28. ^ a b c O'Shei, Tim (June 1995). "Tips on Third Base Defense Shared by Brooks Robinson". Baseball Digest. 54 (6). ISSN 0005-609X.
  29. ^ Brooks Robinson Quotes. – Baseball Almanac.
  30. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/CAL/CAL197708050.shtml
  31. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/BAL/BAL197708130.shtml
  32. ^ Baltimore Orioles retired numbers. – Major League Baseball. – MLB.com.
  33. ^ Duck, Bill. "Retro Recap: The Last Game at Memorial Stadium, Oct. 6. 1991". SB Nation. SB Nation. Retrieved 31 July 2016.
  34. ^ "100 Greatest Baseball Players" Archived February 27, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. – Sporting News.
  35. ^ "The Major League Baseball All-Century Team". – Major League Baseball. – MLB.com.
  36. ^ "Baltimore County Digest". The Baltimore Sun. May 16, 2007. p. 4.B.
  37. ^ "Rawlings All Time Gold Glove Award winners". – Rawlings Gold Glove. – Rawlings.
  38. ^ "Brooks Robinson immortalized with Baltimore statue". The Baltimore Sun. 2011-10-22.
  39. ^ Kubatko, Roch. "Before First Pitch..." MASNSports.com. Retrieved 29 September 2012.
  40. ^ http://baltimore.orioles.mlb.com/bal/ticketing/camdenyards20.jsp
  41. ^ http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/orioles/blog/bal-orioles-postpone-brooks-robinson-sculpture-unveiling-to-sept-29-0501,0,1534635.story
  42. ^ Eck, Frank (August 11, 1971). "Requesting Iced Tea Paid Off For Brooks". The Free Lance–Star. Associated Press. p. 8.
  43. ^ Eck, Frank (October 9, 1960). "Brooks Robinson Marries". The New York Times. Associated Press. p. 8.
  44. ^ "Brooks Robinson, Oriole legend, buoyed by faith, family, friends" The Catholic Review (Archdiocese of Baltimore), May 5, 2010
  45. ^ Newsweek. 77 (1–8): 47. 1971. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  46. ^ Rosen, Jill (2 April 2011). "Fans wish Orioles legend Brooks Robinson a speedy recovery". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 20 April 2011.
  47. ^ Waldman, Tyler (14 April 2011). "Brooks Robinson Released From GBMC, Thanks Fans for Support". Towson, Maryland Patch. Retrieved 20 April 2011.
  48. ^ https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2014/04/14/brooks-robinson-seeks-9-9m-from-tribe-over-fall/7711899/

Further reading

External links

Preceded by
Frank Robinson
Hitting for the cycle
May 15, 1960
Succeeded by
Bill White
1963 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1963 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing fourth in the American League with a record of 86 wins and 76 losses.

1966 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1966 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League with a record of 97 wins and 63 losses, nine games ahead of the runner-up Minnesota Twins. It was their first AL pennant since 1944, when the club was known as the St. Louis Browns. The Orioles swept the NL champion Los Angeles Dodgers in four games to register their first-ever World Series title. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium. They drew 1,203,366 fans to their home ballpark, third in the ten-team league. It would be the highest home attendance of the team's first quarter-century at Memorial Stadium, and was eclipsed by the pennant-winning 1979 Orioles.

1966 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1966 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 37th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 12, 1966, at then-new Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri.

The 10-inning contest – which was played on a memorably hot and humid afternoon in St. Louis, with a game-time temperature of 105 °F (41 °C) – resulted in a 2–1 victory for the NL.

1967 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1967 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 38th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1967, at Anaheim Stadium in Anaheim, California. The game resulted in a 2–1 15 inning victory for the NL. It set the record for the longest All-Star Game by innings, matched in 2008.

1970 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1970 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League East with a record of 108 wins and 54 losses, 15 games ahead of the runner-up New York Yankees. The Orioles swept the Minnesota Twins for the second straight year in the American League Championship Series. They then went on to win their second World Series title over the National League champion Cincinnati Reds in five games, thanks to the glove of third baseman Brooks Robinson.

The team was managed by Earl Weaver, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium.

1970 World Series

The 1970 World Series matched the American League champion Baltimore Orioles (108–54 in the regular season) against the National League champion Cincinnati Reds (102–60), with the Orioles winning in five games.

In this series Emmett Ashford became the first African American to umpire in the Fall Classic. It also featured the first World Series games to be played on artificial turf, as Games 1 and 2 took place at Cincinnati's first-year Riverfront Stadium.

This was the last World Series in which all games were played in the afternoon. Also this was the third time in a World Series where a team leading 3–0 in the series would fail to complete the sweep by losing game 4 but still win game 5 to win the series. 1910 and 1937 were the others. This was the last World Series until 2017 in which both participating teams won over 100 games during the regular season.

1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 49th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1978, at San Diego Stadium in San Diego, home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in a 7-3 victory for the NL.

This was the first All-Star Game to be played in San Diego. It would return in 1992 to be played in the same stadium, though it was renamed Jack Murphy Stadium by that time.

The honorary captains were Brooks Robinson (for the AL) and Eddie Mathews (for the NL).

1983 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1983 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected two, Juan Marichal and Brooks Robinson.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected Walter Alston and George Kell.

Baltimore Orioles

The Baltimore Orioles are an American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. As one of the American League's eight charter teams in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers (not related to the second current Brewers franchise there) before moving to St. Louis, Missouri, to become the St. Louis Browns. After 52 often-beleaguered years in St. Louis, the franchise was purchased in November 1953 by a syndicate of Baltimore business and civic interests led by attorney/civic activist Clarence Miles and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. The team's current owner is American trial lawyer, Peter Angelos.

The Orioles adopted their team name in honor of the official state bird of Maryland; it had also been used by several previous major and minor league baseball clubs in Baltimore, including another AL charter member franchise also named the "Baltimore Orioles," which moved north in 1903 to eventually become the New York Yankees. Nicknames for the team include the "O's" and the "Birds".

The Orioles experienced their greatest success from 1966 to 1983, when they made six World Series appearances, winning three of them (1966, 1970, 1983). This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver. The Orioles have won a total of nine division championships (1969–1971, 1973–1974, 1979, 1983, 1997, 2014), six pennants (1966, 1969–1971, 1979, 1983), and three wild card berths (1996, 2012, 2016). Since moving to Baltimore in 1954, the franchise has a win-loss record of 5252-5066 (with a winning "percentage" of .509) as of the end of the 2018 season.After suffering a stretch of 14 straight losing seasons from 1998 to 2011, the team qualified for the postseason three times under manager Buck Showalter and general manager Dan Duquette, including a division title and advancement to the American League Championship Series for the first time in 17 years in 2014. However, the 2018 team finished with a franchise-worst record of 47–115, prompting the team to move on from Showalter and Duquette following the season's conclusion. The Orioles' current manager is Brandon Hyde, while Mike Elias serves as general manager and executive vice president.

The Orioles are also well known for their influential ballpark, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, which opened in 1992 in downtown Baltimore.

Everett AquaSox

The Everett AquaSox are a Minor League Baseball team of Northwest League and are the Class A Short Season affiliate of the Seattle Mariners. They are located in Everett, Washington, and play their home games at Funko Field which opened in 1984 and has a seating capacity of 3,682. The team was known as the Everett Giants from 1984 to 1994, but changed its name after ending its affiliation with the San Francisco Giants.

The AquaSox have won four division titles and two league championships. Most recently, they won the Northwest League championship in 2010. They previously won the championship in 1985.One of the team logos, used on road caps and jerseys, is based on the "trident" insignia used by the Mariners in the early 1980s (rotated to look like the letter "E" for Everett, instead of "M" for Mariners). Their mascot is Webbly, a frog. According to long-time team radio broadcaster Pat Dillon, "The frog is a cross between a Pacific tree frog and a Central American red-eyed tree frog—and Brooks Robinson." Previously, the mascot for the Everett Giants was a giant hot dog named Frank.

The manager in 2014 was Dave Valle, a former catcher with the Seattle Mariners. The current manager is José Moreno.

Harry Dalton

Harry I. Dalton (August 23, 1928 – October 23, 2005) was an American front-office executive in Major League Baseball. He served as general manager of three American League teams, the Baltimore Orioles (1966–71), California Angels (1972–77) and Milwaukee Brewers (1978–91), and was a principal architect of the Orioles' dynasty of 1966–74 as well as the only AL championship the Brewers ever won (1982).

Born in West Springfield, Massachusetts—also the hometown of Baseball Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher—Dalton graduated from Amherst College and served in the United States Air Force during the Korean War, earning a Bronze Star. After a brief stint as a sportswriter in Springfield, he joined the front office of the Orioles, newly reborn as the relocated St. Louis Browns, in 1954. For the next 11 years, Dalton worked his way up the organizational ladder, rising to the position of director of the Orioles' successful farm system in 1961.In the autumn of 1965, Baltimore general manager Lee MacPhail departed to become top aide to the new Commissioner of Baseball, William Eckert. Dalton was named Director of Player Personnel—in effect, MacPhail's successor. His first order of business was to complete a trade that brought Cincinnati Reds outfielder Frank Robinson to Baltimore for pitchers Milt Pappas and Jack Baldschun and a minor league outfielder. Robinson, 1961 National League Most Valuable Player, was one of the greatest stars in the game, but he had developed a strained relationship with the Cincinnati front office. In Baltimore, he would team with third baseman Brooks Robinson to lead the O's to the 1966 and 1970 World Series championships, and pennants in 1969 and 1971. Dalton was the man who hired Earl Weaver as manager, brought to the Majors young stars such as Bobby Grich and Don Baylor, and acquired key players such as Mike Cuellar, Pat Dobson and Don Buford. (Weaver, Frank Robinson and Brooks Robinson, along with pitching great Jim Palmer, a product of Dalton's farm system, are all in the Hall in Fame.)

After the Orioles lost the 1971 World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates, Dalton was hired to turn around a stumbling Angels franchise. He acquired the great pitcher Nolan Ryan in a December 1971 trade with the New York Mets, but during Dalton's six seasons in Anaheim the team never posted a winning record. After the 1977 season, the Angels hired veteran executive Buzzie Bavasi as Dalton's boss, then released Dalton from his contract so that he could become the general manager of the Brewers.

Milwaukee had a group of talented young players, such as Robin Yount, Cecil Cooper and rookie Paul Molitor, but the nine-year-old franchise had never had a winning season. In 1978, Dalton hired George Bamberger, Weaver's pitching coach for many years, as the Brewers' new manager, and the team gelled into contenders in the American League East Division. By 1981, they made the playoffs and in 1982, Milwaukee won its first and only American League pennant (the Brewers moved to the National League Central Division in 1998). In the 1982 World Series, the "Harvey's Wallbangers" Brewers of manager Harvey Kuenn lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games.

The Brewers contended in 1983, but then began to struggle on the field. The team rebounded in 1987 and 1988, but when it returned to its losing ways, Dalton's position was weakened. After a poor 1991 season, he was replaced as general manager by Sal Bando. Dalton, who remained a consultant in the Milwaukee front office through his 1994 retirement, nevertheless was one of the most respected men in baseball, who had trained other successful general managers such as John Schuerholz, Lou Gorman and Dan Duquette, a fellow Amherst alumnus.On July 24, 2003, Dalton was inducted into the Milwaukee Brewers Walk of Fame outside Miller Park.

Harry Dalton died at age 77 in Scottsdale, Arizona, of complications from Lewy body disease, misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease.

List of Baltimore Orioles awards

This is a list of award winners and single-season league leaders for the Baltimore Orioles professional baseball team.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at third base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007 and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Brooks Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves with the Baltimore Orioles, leading both the American League and all third basemen in awards won. Mike Schmidt is second in wins at third base; he won 10 with the Philadelphia Phillies and leads National League third basemen in Gold Gloves. Scott Rolen has the third-highest total, winning eight awards with the Phillies, the St. Louis Cardinals, and the Cincinnati Reds. Six-time winners at third base are Buddy Bell, Nolan Arenado, Eric Chavez, and Robin Ventura. Ken Boyer, Doug Rader, and Ron Santo have each won five Gold Gloves at third base, and four-time winners include Adrián Beltré, Gary Gaetti, and Matt Williams. Hall of Famers who have won a Gold Glove at the position include Robinson, Schmidt, Santo, Wade Boggs, and George Brett.The fewest errors committed in a third baseman's winning season is five, achieved by Boggs in 1995 and Chavez in 2006. Two National League winners have made six errors in a season to lead that league: Mike Lowell in 2005, and Schmidt in 1986. Chavez' fielding percentage of .987 in 2006 leads all winners; Lowell leads the National League with his .983 mark. Robinson leads all winners with 410 assists in 1974, and made the most putouts in the American League (174 in 1966). The most putouts by a winner was 187, made by Santo in 1967. Schmidt leads the National League in assists, with 396 in 1977. The most double plays turned in a season was 44 by Robinson in 1974; he turned at least 40 double plays during three of his winning seasons. The National League leader is Nolan Arenado with 42 in 2015Ken Boyer and Clete Boyer are the only pair of brothers to have won Gold Glove Awards at third base. Older brother Ken won five Gold Gloves in six years with the Cardinals (1958–1961, 1963), and Clete won in 1969 with the Atlanta Braves.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a third baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'.

The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory.

Brooks Robinson is the all-time leader in career putouts as a third baseman with 2,697. Robinson is the only third baseman with more than 2,500 career putouts.

Major League Baseball All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award

The Major League Baseball All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award which is presented to the most outstanding player in each year's MLB All-Star Game. Awarded each season since 1962 (two games were held and an award was presented to each game winner in 1962), it was originally called the "Arch Ward Memorial Award" in honor of Arch Ward, the man who conceived of the All-Star Game in 1933. The award's name was changed to the "Commissioner's Trophy" in 1970 (two National League (NL) players were presented the award in 1975), but this name change was reversed in 1985 when the World Series Trophy was renamed the Commissioner's Trophy. Finally, the trophy was renamed the Ted Williams Most Valuable Player Award in 2002, in honor of former Boston Red Sox player Ted Williams, who had died earlier that year. No award was presented for the 2002 All-Star Game, which ended in a tie. Thus, the Anaheim Angels' Garret Anderson was the first recipient of the newly named Ted Williams Award in 2003. The All-Star Game Most Valuable Player also receives a Chevrolet vehicle, choosing between two cars.As of 2018, NL players have won the award 27 times (including one award shared by two players), and American League (AL) players have won 30 times. Baltimore Orioles players have won the most awards for a single franchise (with six); players from the Cincinnati Reds, Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants are tied for the most in the NL with five each. Five players have won the award twice: Willie Mays (1963, 1968), Steve Garvey (1974, 1978), Gary Carter (1981, 1984), Cal Ripken, Jr. (1991, 2001), and Mike Trout (2014, 2015). The award has been shared by multiple players once; Bill Madlock and Jon Matlack shared the award in 1975. Two players have won the award for a game in which their league lost: Brooks Robinson in 1966 and Carl Yastrzemski in 1970. One pair of awardees were father and son (Ken Griffey Sr. and Ken Griffey Jr.), and another were brothers (Roberto Alomar and Sandy Alomar, Jr.). Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim became the first player ever to win the MVP award in back-to-back years in the 86-year history of the MLB All-Star Game when he accomplished the feat in both 2014 and 2015. Alex Bregman of the Houston Astros is the most recent MLB All-Star Game MVP, winning the award in 2018. Only six players have won the MVP award in the only All-Star Game in which they appeared; LaMarr Hoyt, Bo Jackson, J. D. Drew, Melky Cabrera, Eric Hosmer, and Alex Bregman.

PeoplesBank Park

PeoplesBank Park is a 5,200-seat baseball park in York, Pennsylvania that hosted its first regular season baseball game on June 16, 2007, as the tenants of the facility, the York Revolution, defeated the Newark Bears, 9–6. Located on Codorus Creek, the facility had been in the planning stages since 2003, but local politics and funding temporarily halted the plans. The city of York demolished 20 buildings in the Arch Street neighborhood in June 2006, with construction beginning in September 2006. Due to inclement weather, PeoplesBank Park opened one month later than originally planned. The naming rights were purchased by Sovereign Bank, a banking institution based in nearby Reading, for $2.7 million over ten years. The name was changed to "Santander Stadium" in October 2013 following the 2009 takeover of Sovereign Bank by Santander Bank. In December 2015, it was announced the park would be known as "PeoplesBank Park" under a new naming rights deal with locally owned PeoplesBank.PeoplesBank Park was honored as the "Ballpark of the Year" by the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball following the end of its 2008 regular season. The award recognizes the efforts of the Revolution staff and groundskeepers, judging such criteria as field conditions, stadium operations, cleanliness, and atmosphere.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Third baseman

A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'.

The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory.

Third base is known as the "hot corner", because the third baseman is relatively close to the batter and most right-handed hitters tend to hit the ball hard in this direction. A third baseman must possess good hand-eye coordination and quick reactions in order to catch hard line drives sometimes in excess of 125 miles per hour (201 km/h). Third basemen often must begin in a position even closer to the batter if a bunt is expected, creating a hazard if the ball is instead hit sharply. As with middle infielders, right-handed throwing players are standard at the position because they do not need to turn their body before throwing across the infield to first base. Mike Squires, who played fourteen games at third base in 1982 and 1983, is a very rare example of a third baseman who threw lefty. Some third basemen have been converted from middle infielders or outfielders because the position does not require them to run as fast.

Expectations of how well a third baseman should be able to hit have varied a great deal over time; in the early years of the sport, these expectations were similar to those for shortstops, the third baseman being merely the less skilled defensive player. Players who could hit with more ability often were not suited for third base, either because they were left-handed or because they were not mobile enough for the position. However, the beginning of the live-ball era in the 1920s created a greater demand for more offense, and third basemen have since been expected to hit either for a high average (.290 or better) or with moderate to substantial power. Since the 1950s the position has become more of a power position with sluggers such as Eddie Mathews, Mike Schmidt and Ron Santo becoming stars.

There are fewer third basemen in the Baseball Hall of Fame than there are Hall of Famers of any other position. Furthermore, with the notable exception of John McGraw and Bobby Cox, few third basemen have gone on to have successful managing careers, with Jimmy Dykes and Negro Leaguer Dave Malarcher being perhaps the next most prominent managers who began their careers at third base.

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