British Olympic Association

The British Olympic Association (BOA) is the National Olympic Committee for the United Kingdom. It represents the Olympic movement and organises the participation of athletes from across the Olympic sports which competes as Great Britain or ("Team GB") at both the summer and winter Olympic and Youth Olympic Games, at the summer and winter European Youth Olympic Festivals and at the European Games.

British Olympic Association
British Olympic Association logo
British Olympic Association logo
Country/Region Great Britain
CodeGBR
Created1905
Recognized1905
Continental
Association
EOC
HeadquartersLondon, United Kingdom
PresidentThe Princess Royal
Websitewww.teamgb.com
NotesAlso includes the following territories and dependencies:

 Guernsey
 Jersey
 Isle of Man
 Anguilla
 Falkland Islands
 Gibraltar
 Montserrat
 Saint Helena

 Turks and Caicos Islands

BOA members and Sport Bodies

The British Olympic Association of the United Kingdom, its constituent countries, the Crown dependencies and British overseas territories which do not have their own NOC competes at all summer, winter and youth Olympics as –

Members

The association comprises members from the following –

Note – Northern Irish athletes can choose whether to compete for Great Britain or for the Republic of Ireland, as they are entitled to citizenship of either nation under the Good Friday Agreement.

Crown dependencies:

British Overseas Territories:

Note – IOC Rules currently do not allow dependent territories to obtain recognition for National Olympic Committees (NOCs). Three British Overseas Territories have their own NOCs predating this rule and are therefore not connected with the BOA: Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands and the Cayman Islands. While the territories of British Antarctic Territory, British Indian Ocean Territory and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands are nominally represented by the BOA, these territories have no permanent population and do not send athletes.

British sports bodies associated with the BOA

Role

The BOA is one of 206 National Committees (NOCs) currently recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The IOC leads the promotion of Olympism in accordance with the Olympic Charter.

Working with the national governing bodies of each sport, the BOA selects Team GB's members to compete in all sports at the summer and winter Olympics. The BOA is independent and receives no funding from the government. Its income comes from fundraising and events.

The United Kingdom (which competes as "Great Britain") is one of only five countries (the others being Australia, France, Greece and Switzerland) which have never failed to be represented at the Summer Olympic Games since 1896. Of these countries Great Britain, France and Switzerland are the only countries to have been present at all Olympic Winter Games, thus Great Britain is one of three countries that have competed at all Olympic Games. Great Britain is also the only nation in the Olympic Games to have won a Gold in every games. Great Britain has hosted three Olympic Games, all of them in London: in 1908, 1948 and 2012, which is the record for any city.

Structure

At its formation in 1905 the association consisted of seven national governing body members from the following sports: fencing, life-saving, cycling, skating, rowing, athletics, Rugby football, Association football, and archery. It now includes as its members the thirty-three national governing bodies of each Olympic sport, both summer and winter.

A representative of each of the Olympic sports makes up the NOC, the BOA's decision and policy-making body. The NOC elects three officers: a President, a Chairman, and a Vice-Chairman, each for a four-year term. Six members of the NOC are elected to the Board, which oversees the work of the BOA and puts forward proposals for decision by the NOC.

Founding

The BOA's origins pre-date the International Olympic movement and its governing body, the International Olympic Committee.

It traces its roots back to the National Olympian Association (NOA), which held its inaugural meeting at the Liverpool Gymnasium, Myrtle Street, Liverpool in November 1865. It promoted an annual series of sporting events across Britain, with the aim of encouraging participation in Physical Education through Olympian festivals. The NOA came about mainly through the efforts of John Hulley of Liverpool (Chairman), Dr. William Penny Brookes (of Much Wenlock) and E G Ravenstein (president of the German Gymnastic Society of London).[3] It took the existing Olympian Games of Much Wenlock as its example, thus the NOA Games "were open to all comers" and not just the products of Britain's public schools.

After the NOA closed in 1883 its motto and ethos were inherited by the National Physical Recreation Society (NPRS) which was founded in 1885. From 1902 the President and Treasurer of the NPRS were members of the Olympic "Comité Britannique" and the NPRS was a founding body of the British Olympic Association in 1905.[4]

See also

Further reading

  • Llewellyn, Matthew P. Rule Britannia: Nationalism, Identity and the Modern Olympic Games (Routledge 2012)

References

  1. ^ "Sir Hugh Robertson Elected As Chairman Of The British Olympic Association". British Olympic Association. 24 November 2016. Retrieved 24 February 2017.
  2. ^ "Annamarie Phelps CBE has become Vice-Chair of the British Olympic Association". British Olympic Association. 23 February 2017. Retrieved 24 February 2017.
  3. ^ The Liverpool Mercury, 7 November 1865
  4. ^ National Olympian Association, The John Hulley Memorial Fund

External links

British Judo Association

The British Judo Association (BJA) is the governing body for the Olympic Sport of Judo in the United Kingdom. In 2015 there were 776,756 members.The BJA represents the United Kingdom internationally and is a member of the International Judo Federation, the European Judo Union, the Judo Confederation of the European Union, the British Olympic Association, the Central Council of Physical Recreation, and the Commonwealth Judo Association. It is recognised by the United Kingdom Sports Council, Sport England, Sport Wales, the Sports Council for Northern Ireland, Sport Scotland, and the British Olympic Association.

Clive Woodward

Sir Clive Ronald Woodward (born 6 January 1956) is an English former rugby union player and coach. He was coach of the England team from 1997 to 2004, managing them to victory in the 2003 Rugby World Cup. He also coached the 2005 British and Irish Lions tour to New Zealand, losing the test series 3-0 . He is currently a pundit for ITV Sport, working on their coverage of the Six Nations and Rugby World Cup.

Colin Moynihan, 4th Baron Moynihan

Colin Berkeley Moynihan, 4th Baron Moynihan (born 13 September 1955) is a British Olympic coxswain, businessman, Conservative politician, and sports administrator. Lord Moynihan served as chairman of the British Olympic Association (BOA) from 2005 to 2012.

Great Britain at the 1928 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, Netherlands. British athletes won only three gold medals (down from nine in 1924), and twenty medals overall, finishing eleventh. 232 competitors, 201 men and 31 women, took part in 84 events in 14 sports.

Great Britain at the 1932 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California, United States. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games. 108 competitors, 90 men and 18 women, took part in 50 events in 10 sports. British athletes won four gold medals (up from three in 1928), and sixteen medals overall, finishing eighth.

Great Britain at the 1936 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. 208 competitors, 171 men and 37 women, took part in 91 events in 17 sports. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games.

Great Britain at the 1948 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed as the host nation for the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. It was the second time that the United Kingdom had hosted the Summer Olympic Games, equalling the record of France and the United States to that point. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games. 404 competitors, 335 men and 68 women, took part in 139 events in 21 sports.

Great Britain at the 1952 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. 257 competitors, 213 men and 44 women, took part in 127 events in 18 sports. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games. Indeed, it is the only country to have won at least one gold medal at every Summer Olympic Games: in 1952, they achieved their only gold medal during the last event of the last day of competition in Helsinki. Along with 1904 and 1996, this is Great Britain's lowest gold medal count.

Great Britain at the 1956 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games. 189 competitors, 163 men and 26 women, took part in 108 events in 17 sports.The Melbourne Games saw an improvement on Great Britain and Northern Ireland's performance at the two preceding Games. British athletes won six gold medals (up from just one in 1952). Overall, they won twenty-four medals, finishing eighth.

Great Britain at the 1960 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy. 253 competitors, 206 men and 47 women, took part in 130 events in 17 sports. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games.

The Rome Games continued Great Britain and Northern Ireland's disappointing run in the Olympics, with British athletes picking up only two gold medals (down from six in 1956). Overall, they won twenty medals, finishing twelfth.

Great Britain at the 1964 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan. 204 competitors, 160 men and 44 women, took part in 124 events in 17 sports. British athletes have competed and won at least one gold medal in every Summer Olympic Games. Future Liberal Democrat leader Menzies Campbell represented Britain at the 200m.

Great Britain at the 1968 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, Mexico. 225 competitors, 175 men and 50 women, took part in 133 events in 16 sports. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games.

Great Britain at the 1976 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 242 competitors, 176 men and 66 women, took part in 148 events in 17 sports. British athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games.

Great Britain at the 2008 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China. The United Kingdom was represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), and the team of selected athletes was officially known as Team GB. Britain is one of only five NOCs to have competed in every modern Summer Olympic Games since 1896. The delegation of 547 people included 311 competitors – 168 men, 143 women – and 236 officials. The team was made up of athletes from the whole United Kingdom including Northern Ireland (whose people may elect to hold Irish citizenship and are able to be selected to represent either Great Britain or Ireland at the Olympics). Additionally some British overseas territories compete separately from Britain in Olympic competition.

Great Britain's medal performance at the 2008 Summer Olympics was its best in a century; only its performance at the 1908 Summer Olympics, which Britain hosted in London, resulted in more gold medals being awarded. The total medal count, 47, is also the fourth highest Great Britain has ever achieved, with only the 1908, 2012 and 2016 Games resulting in more medals. Following retests of doping samples in 2016 in connection with the Russian doping scandal, 4 further medals, all bronze, are expected to be awarded in athletics, retrospectively bringing the total gained to 51. As of the 26th July 2018, the award of the bronze medals to the Men's and Women's 4 x 400 metres relay teams and the upgrade of Goldie Sayers to bronze in the Women's Javelin, confirmed by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), brought the official medal total to 50, after which the confirmation of Kelly Sotherton receiving her reallocated bronze medal in the Women's Heptathlon took the total number of medals won to 51.

Great Britain finished 4th overall in the medal tables, a target previously set by UK Sport, the public body responsible for distributing funding to elite sport, for the 2012 Games. UK Sport considered whether to target 3rd place in the 2012 Games, which was hosted by the United Kingdom in London.Cyclist Chris Hoy became the first British athlete in 100 years to win three gold medals at a single Olympic Games.

Because London was to be host city of the 2012 Summer Olympics, a British segment was performed during the closing ceremony.

Great Britain at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Great Britain, represented by the British Olympic Association (BOA), is scheduled to compete at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo from 24 July to 9 August 2020. British athletes have appeared in every Summer Olympic Games of the modern era, alongside Australia, France, Greece, and Switzerland, though Great Britain is the only country to have won at least one gold medal at all of them.

London Olympics

London hosted the Olympic Games in 1908, 1948 and 2012. The 2012 Summer Olympics made London the first city to have hosted the modern Games of three Olympiads. London is the only city in the United Kingdom to have ever hosted the Olympics; the United States is the only country to have hosted Summer Olympics on more occasions than the UK. Also, London is the only city to have bid more than once and still hold a 100% record.

British participation in Olympic events, both as a competitor and as a host, is the responsibility of the British Olympic Association.

London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

The London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) was the organisation responsible for overseeing the planning and development of the 2012 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. It was jointly established by the UK Government's Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Mayor of London and the British Olympic Association and was structured as a private company limited by guarantee. LOCOG worked closely with the publicly funded Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA), which is responsible for the planning and construction of new venues and infrastructure.

The organising committee, which was not responsible for building permanent venues, reported spent £2.38 billion since winning the bid in 2005 and generated £2.41 billion. On 30 May 2013 it handed back to the government, Britain's Olympic committee and other beneficiaries a surplus of £30 million from the 2012 Games. The British Olympic Association received £5.3 million, the British Paralympic Association £2.6 million, and £20 million was returned to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Polo at the 1908 Summer Olympics

At the 1908 Summer Olympics, a polo tournament was contested. It was the second time the sport had been featured at the Olympics, with 1900 being its first appearance.

The venue was the Hurlingham Polo Grounds in London. The Hurlingham Club presented a Challenge Cup to the winner of the tournament, which consisted of three teams. All three teams represented the British Olympic Association, with two from England and one from Ireland. The two English teams played each first, with the winner playing against the Irish team. Roehampton won both games, taking the gold medal, while the other two teams did not face each other to break the tie for second place.

Team GB

Team GB is the brand name used since 1999 by the British Olympic Association (BOA) for their Great Britain and Northern Ireland Olympic team. The brand was developed after the 1996 Summer Olympics, and is now a trademark of the BOA. It is meant to unify the team as one body, irrespective of each member athlete's particular sport. It forms part of a marketing strategy, where its brevity is seen as beneficial. The brand is seen as controversial by some, for focusing on Great Britain, at the expense of Northern Ireland, with critics suggesting it be changed to Team UK, something the BOA has so far rejected.

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