British Fantasy Award

The British Fantasy Awards are awarded annually by the British Fantasy Society (BFS), first in 1976. Prior to that they were known as The August Derleth Fantasy Awards (see August Derleth Award). First awarded in 1972 (The Knight of Swords by Michael Moorcock) only for novels, the number of award categories increased and in 1976 the BFS renamed them collectively the British Fantasy Awards. The current award categories are Best Fantasy Novel (the Robert Holdstock Award), Best Horror Novel (the August Derleth Award), Best Novella, Best Short Story, Best Independent Press, Best Artist, Best Anthology, Best Collection, Best Comic/Graphic Novel, Best Non-Fiction, and Best Newcomer (the Sydney J. Bounds Award), while the Karl Edward Wagner Award for "important contribution to the genre or the Society" is given at the discretion of the BFS committee.[1] The membership of the BFS vote to determine the shortlists of the awards, the winners being decided by juries.

Nominees and winners

1999

August Derleth Award (Best Novel)

Anthology

Artist

  • Bob Covington

Collection

Short Story

Small Press

  • Andy Cox, The Third Alternative

Special Award

2000

August Derleth Award (Best Novel)

Anthology

Artist

Collection

Short Story

Small Press

  • Darren Floyd, Razorblade Press

Special Award

2004

The 2004 awards were presented at FantasyCon XXVIII held in 2004 at the Quality Hotel, Bentley, Walsall.[3]

August Derleth Award (Best Novel)

Short Fiction

Collection

Anthology

Small Press

Artist

  • Les Edwards (winner)
  • Dave Bezzina
  • Deirdre Counihan
  • Bob Covington
  • Dominic Harman

Special Award

2005

The 2005 awards were presented at FantasyCon 2005, held 30 September–2 October 2005 at the Quality Hotel, Bentley Walsall.[3]

August Derleth Fantasy Award (Best Novel)

Best Novella

Best Short Story

Best Collection

  • Out of His Mind, Stephen Gallagher (PS Publishing) (winner)
  • Somnambulists, Allen Ashley (Elastic Press)
  • Darker Ages, Paul Finch (Sarob Press)
  • Things That Never Happen, M. John Harrison (Gollancz)
  • Trujillo and Other Stories, Lucius Shepard (PS Publishing)

Best Anthology

Best Small Press

  • Elastic Press (Andrew Hook) (winner)
  • The Alien Online (ed. Ariel)
  • Pendragon Press (ed. Christopher Teague)
  • Postscripts (Peter Crowther)
  • PS Publishing (Peter Crowther)
  • Scheherazade (ed. Elizabeth Counihan)
  • The Third Alternative (ed. Andy Cox)
  • Telos Publications (David J. Howe & Stephen James Walker)

Best Artist

  • Les Edwards / Edward Miller (winner)
  • John Coulthart
  • Allen Koszowski
  • Richard Marchand
  • David Magitis
  • Ian Simmons

Special Award

2006

The 2006 awards were presented at FantasyCon 2006 held 22–24 September 2006 at Britannia Hotel, Nottingham.[3]

August Derleth Fantasy Award (Best Novel)

Best Novella

  • The Mask Behind the Face, Stuart Young

Best Short Story

Best Collection

Best Anthology

  • The Elastic Book of Numbers, Allen Ashley

Best Small Press

  • PS Publishing, Peter Crowther

Best Artist

Special Award

2007

The 2007 awards were presented at FantasyCon XXXI held 21–23 September 2007 at Britannia Hotel, Nottingham.[3][4]

August Derleth Fantasy Award (Best Novel)

  • Dusk, Tim Lebbon (Spectra) (winner)
  • Breeding Ground, Sarah Pinborough, (Leisure Books)
  • Bridge of Dreams, Chaz Brenchley, (Ace Books)
  • Jack of Ravens: Kingdom of the Serpent, Book 1, Mark Chadbourn, (Gollancz)
  • Nova Swing, M. John Harrison, (Gollancz)
  • The Devil You Know, Mike Carey, (Orbit Books)
  • The Face of Twilight, Mark Samuels, (PS Publishing)
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora, Scott Lynch, (Gollancz)
  • The Unblemished, Conrad Williams, (Earthling Publications)

Best Novella

  • Kid, Paul Finch (Choices, Pendragon Press) (winner)
  • The Memory of Joy, Eric Brown, (Choices, Pendragon Press)
  • She Loves Monsters, Simon Clark, (Necessary Evil Press)
  • The Wife's Djinn, Ian McDonald (Asimov's Science Fiction, July 2006)
  • Rough Cut, Gary McMahon (Pendragon Press)

Best Short Story

  • "Whisper Lane", Mark Chadbourn (BFS: A Celebration, the British Fantasy Society) (winner)
  • "The Little Drummer Boy", Marion Arnott (Extended Play: The Elastic Book of Music, Elastic Press)
  • "Puca Muc", Steve Lockley & Paul Lewis (Shrouded by Darkness, Telos Publishing)
  • "The Disappeared", Sarah Singleton, (Time Pieces, NewCon Press)
  • "31/10", Stephen Volk (Dark Corners, Gray Friar Press)
  • "The Veteran", Conrad Williams (Postscripts #6, PS Publishing)

Best Collection

  • Fragile Things, Neil Gaiman (Headline) (winner)
  • Lost, The District, and Other Stories, Joel Lane (Night Shade Books)
  • The Man From the Club Diogenes, Kim Newman (Monkeybrain)
  • And Other Tales Unbecoming of Horror, Mike O'Driscoll (Elastic Press)
  • The Ephémère, Neil Williamson (Elastic Press)

Best Anthology

  • Extended Play: The Elastic Book of Music, Gary Couzens (Elastic Press) (winner)
  • The Year's Best Fantasy & Horror: 19th Annual Collection, Ellen Datlow, Kelly Link & Gavin J. Grant (Wed Martin's Press)
  • Shrouded by Darkness: Tales of Terror, Alison LR Davies (Telos Publishing)
  • The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 17, Stephen Jones (Robinson Publishing)
  • Choices, Christopher Teague, (Pendragon Press)

Best Small Press

  • PS Publishing, Peter Crowther (winner)
  • TTA Press, Andy Cox
  • Elastic Press, Andrew Hook
  • Telos Publishing, David J. Howe & Stephen James Walker
  • Pendragon Press, Christopher Teague

Best Artist

  • Vincent Chong (winner)
  • Les Edwards / Edward Miller
  • Dean Harkness
  • John Picacio

Best Non-Fiction

  • The Days of the Dodo, Allen Ashley (Dodo Press)
  • Films and the Hellraiser: Their Legacy, Paul Kane (Macfarland & Co.)
  • Cinema Macabre, Mark Morris (PS Publishing)
  • Into the Unknown: The Life of Fantastic Nigel Kneale, Andy Murray (Headpress)
  • James Tiptree Jr.: The Double Life of Alice B. Sheldon, Julie Phillips (Wed Martin's Press)

Best Newcomer

Special Award

2008

The 2008 awards were presented at FantasyCon 2008 held at Britannia Hotel, Nottingham.[3]

August Derleth Fantasy Award (Best Novel)

Best Novella

  • The Scalding Rooms, Conrad Williams (PS Publishing)

Best Short Story

  • "My Stone Desire", Joel Lane (Black Static #1, TTA Press)

Best Anthology

Best Collection

Best Newcomer

Special Award

Best Non-Fiction

Best Artist

  • Vincent Chong

Best Small Press

  • PS Publishing, Peter Crowther

2009

The 2009 awards were presented at FantasyCon 2009 held at Britannia Hotel, Nottingham.[3]

August Derleth Fantasy Award (Best Novel)

Best Novella

Best Short Fiction

  • "Do You See", Sarah Pinborough from Myth-Understandings, ed. by Ian Whates (Newcon Press)

Best Collection

  • Bull Running for Girls, Allyson Bird (Screaming Dreams)

Best Anthology

  • The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 19, ed. Stephen Jones (Constable & Robinson)

PS Publishing Best Small Press

  • Elastic Press (Andrew Hook)

Best Non-Fiction

  • Basil Copper: A Life in Books, Basil Copper ed. Stephen Jones (PS Publishing)

Best Magazine/Periodical

  • Postscripts, ed. Peter Crowther and Nick Gevers (PS Publishing)

Best Artist

  • Vincent Chong

Best Comic/Graphic Novel

Best Television

Best Film

Sydney J. Bounds Award (Best Newcomer)

Karl Edward Wagner Award (Special Award)

2010

The 2010 awards were presented at FantasyCon 2010 held 17–19 September 2010.[3]

August Derleth Fantasy Award (Best Novel)

  • One, Conrad Williams (Virgin Horror)

Best Novella

Best Short Fiction

Best Collection

Best Anthology

  • The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 20, ed. Stephen Jones (Constable & Robinson)

PS Publishing Best Small Press

Best Non-Fiction

Best Magazine/Periodical

  • Murky Depths, edited and published by Terry Martin

Best Artist

  • Vincent Chong, for work including covers for The Witnesses Are Gone (PS Publishing) and The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 20 (Constable & Robinson)

Best Comic/Graphic Novel

  • Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?, Neil Gaiman and Andy Kubert (DC Comics/Titan Books) (winner)

Best Television

Best Film

Sydney J. Bounds Award (Best Newcomer)

  • Kari Sperring for Living With Ghosts (DAW)

Karl Edward Wagner Award (Special Award)

2011

Karl Edward Wagner Special Award

Best Novel

  • No award. (Winner announced as Demon Dance by Sam Stone (House Of Murky Depths), but Stone returned the award.)[5]

Best Novella

Best Short Story

  • "Fool's Gold" by Sam Stone, from The Bitten Word, Ed. Ian Whates (Newcon Press)

Best Anthology

  • Back From The Dead: The Legacy of the Pan Book Of Horror Stories, Johnny Mains (Ed.) (Noose & Gibbet)

Best Collection

Best Non-Fiction

Best Artist

  • Vincent Chong

Best Comic/Graphic Novel

Best Magazine/Periodical

  • Black Static, Andy Cox (Ed.) (TTA Press)

Best Small Press

Best Film

  • Inception

Best Television

  • Sherlock

Sydney J. Bounds Award For Best Newcomer

  • Robert Jackson Bennet, for Mr Shivers (Orbit)

2012

August Derleth Award for best horror novel

Robert Holdstock Award for best fantasy novel

Best novella

Best short fiction

Best anthology

Best collection

Best screenplay

Best magazine/periodical

  • Black Static edited by Andy Cox and TTA Press

Best comic/graphic novel

PS Publishing Independent Press Award

Best artist

  • Daniele Serra

Best non-fiction

2013

August Derleth Award for best horror novel

Robert Holdstock Award for best fantasy novel

Best novella

  • The Nine Deaths of Dr. Valentine by John Llewellyn Probert

Best short story

  • Shark! Shark! by Ray Cluley

Best anthology

Best collection

  • Remember Why You Fear Me: The Best Dark Fiction of Robert Shearman by Robert Shearman

Best screenplay

Best magazine/periodical

Best comic/graphic novel

PS Publishing Independent Press Award

Best artist

  • Sean Phillips

Best non-fiction

  • Pornokitsch by Anne C. Perry and Jared Shurin

The Karl Edward Wagner Award

The Sydney J. Bounds Award for Best Newcomer

  • Hair Side, Flesh Side by Helen Marshall

2014

August Derleth Award for best horror novel

Robert Holdstock Award for best fantasy novel

Best novella

Best short story

  • Signs of the Times by Carole Johnstone

Best anthology

Best collection

Best film/television episode

Best magazine/periodical

  • Clarkesworld edited by Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace and Kate Baker

Best comic/graphic novel

PS Publishing Independent Press Award

  • The Alchemy Press, Peter Coleborn

Best artist

  • Joey Hi-Fi

Best non-fiction

  • Speculative Fiction 2012 edited by Justin Landon and Jared Shurin

The Karl Edward Wagner Award

The Sydney J. Bounds Award for Best Newcomer

2015

The 2015 winners were presented on Oct 25, 2015 at FantasyCon 2015 in Nottingham.[6]

August Derleth Award for best horror novel

Robert Holdstock Award for best fantasy novel

Best novella

  • "Newspaper Heart" by Stephen Volk (in The Spectral Book of Horror Stories)

Best short story

  • "A Woman’s Place" by Emma Newman (in Two Hundred and Twenty-One Baker Streets)

Best anthology

  • Lightspeed: Women Destroy Science Fiction Special Issue, edited by Christie Yant

Best collection

Best film/television episode

Best magazine/periodical

  • Holdfast Magazine, edited by Laurel Sills & Lucy Smee

Best comic/graphic novel

Best Independent Press

  • Fox Spirit Books

Best artist

  • Karla Ortiz

Best non-fiction

  • Letters to Arkham: The Letters of Ramsey Campbell and August Derleth, 1961-1971, edited by S. T. Joshi

The Karl Edward Wagner Award

The Sydney J. Bounds Award for Best Newcomer

  • The Three by Sarah Lotz

2016

The 2016 BFAs were awarded on 25 September 2016, at the FantasyCon 2016, "FantasyCon by the Sea", in the Grand Hotel, Scarborough.

Best anthology

  • The Doll Collection, ed. Ellen Datlow (winner)
  • African Monsters, ed. Margrét Helgadóttir and Jo Thomas
  • Aickman's Heirs, ed. Simon Strantzas
  • Best British Horror 2015, ed. Johnny Mains
  • The 2nd Spectral Book of Horror Stories, ed. Mark Morris

Best artist

  • Julie Dillon (winner)
  • Ben Baldwin
  • Vincent Chong
  • Evelinn Enoksen
  • Sarah Anne Langton
  • Jeffrey Alan Love

Best collection

  • Ghost Summer: Stories, Tananarive Due (winner)
  • Monsters, Paul Kane
  • Probably Monsters, Ray Cluley
  • Scar City, Joel Lane
  • Skein and Bone, V.H. Leslie
  • The Stars Seem So Far Away, Margrét Helgadóttir

Best comic/graphic novel

Best fantasy novel (the Robert Holdstock Award)

Best film/television production

Best horror novel (the August Derleth Award)

Best independent press

  • Angry Robot (Marc Gascoigne) (winner)
  • The Alchemy Press (Peter Coleborn and Jan Edwards)
  • Fox Spirit Books (Adele Wearing)
  • Newcon Press (Ian Whates)

Best magazine/periodical

Best newcomer (the Sydney J. Bounds Award)

Best non-fiction

  • Letters to Tiptree, ed. Alexandra Pierce and Alisa Krasnostein (winner)
  • The Art of Horror: An Illustrated History, ed. Stephen Jones
  • Fantasy-Faction, ed. Marc Aplin and Jennie Ivins
  • Ginger Nuts of Horror, ed. Jim Mcleod
  • King for a Year, ed. Mark West
  • Matrilines, Kari Sperring

Best novella

Best short fiction

  • Fabulous Beasts, Priya Sharma (winner)
  • The Blue Room, V.H. Leslie
  • Dirt Land, Ralph Robert Moore
  • Hippocampus, Adam Nevill
  • Strange Creation, Frances Kay
  • When The Moon Man Knocks, Cate Gardner

BFS Special Award (the Karl Edward Wagner Award)

  • the FantasyCon Redcloaks, Past and Present

2017

Anthology: People of Colour Destroy Science Fiction ed. (Lightspeed Magazine), Nalo Hopkinson & Kristine Ong Muslim

Artist: Daniele Serra

Collection: Some Will Not Sleep (Ritual Limited), Adam L G Nevill

Comic/graphic novel: Monstress, Vol 1: Awakening (Image Comics), Marjorie Liu & Sana Takeda

Fantasy novel (the Robert Holdstock Award): The Tiger and the Wolf (Pan Macmillan), Adrian Tchaikovsky

Film/television production: Arrival (Paramount Pictures), Denis Villeneuve, Eric Heisserer & Ted Chiang

Horror novel (the August Derleth Award): Disappearance at Devil's Rock (Titan Books), Paul Tremblay

Independent press: Grimbold Books

Magazine/periodical: Tor.com

Newcomer (the Sydney J. Bounds Award): Erica L Satifka, Stay Crazy (Apex Book Company)

Non-fiction: The Geek Feminist Revolution (Tor Books), Kameron Huxley

Novella: The Ballad of Black Tom (Tor.com Publishing), Victor LaValle

Short fiction: “White Rabbit” (Black Static 50 – Jan/Feb 2016), Georgina Bruce

The Special Award (the Karl Edward Wagner Award): Jan Edwards

2018

The 2018 awards were presented on 21 October 2018 at FantasyCon 2018, held at the Queen Hotel, Chester.[7][8]

Best Anthology

  • New Fears, ed. Mark Morris (Titan Books)
  • 2084, ed. George Sandison (Unsung Stories)
  • Dark Satanic Mills: Great British Horror Book 2, ed. Steve Shaw (Black Shuck Books)
  • Imposter Syndrome, ed. James Everington & Dan Howarth (Dark Minds Press)
  • Pacific Monsters, ed. Margret Helgadottir (Fox Spirit)

Best Artist

  • Jeffrey Alan Love
  • Ben Baldwin
  • Victo Ngai
  • Daniele Sera
  • Sophie E Tallis
  • Sana Takeda

Best Audio

  • Anansi Boys (by Neil Gaiman, adapted by Dirk Maggs for BBC Radio 4)
  • Brave New Words podcast (Ed Fortune and Starburst Magazine)
  • Breaking the Glass Slipper podcast (Lucy Hounsom, Charlotte Bond & Megan Leigh)
  • Ivory Towers (by Richard H Brooks, directed by Karim Kronfli for 11th Hour Audio Productions)
  • PseudoPod podcast (Alasdair Stuart and Escape Artists)
  • Tea & Jeopardy podcast (Emma & Peter Newman)

Best Collection

  • Strange Weather, by Joe Hill (Gollancz)
  • Norse Mythology, by Neil Gaiman (Bloomsbury)
  • Tanith by Choice, by Tanith Lee (Newcon Press)
  • Tender: Stories, by Sofia Samatar (Small Beer Press)
  • You Will Grow Into Them, by Malcolm Devlin (Unsung Stories)

Best Comic / Graphic Novel

  • Monstress, Vol. 2, by Marjorie Liu & Sana Takeda (Image)
  • Bitch Planet Vol 2: President Bitch, by Kelly Sue DeConnick, Taki Soma & Valentine de Landro (Image)
  • Grim & Bold, by Joshua Cornah (Kristell Ink)
  • Tomorrow, by Jack Lothian & Garry Mac (BHP Comics)
  • The Wicked + The Divine Vol 5: Imperial Phase Part 1, by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie (Image)

Best Fantasy Novel (the Robert Holdstock Award)

Best Film / Television Production

Best Horror Novel (the August Derleth Award)

  • The Changeling, by Victor LaValle (Canongate)
  • Behind Her Eyes, by Sarah Pinborough (Harper Collins)
  • The Boy on the Bridge, by MR Carey (Orbit)
  • The Crow Garden, by Alison Littlewood (Jo Fletcher Books)
  • Relics, by Tim Lebbon (Titan Books)

Best Independent Press

  • Unsung Stories
  • Fox Spirit
  • Grimbold Books
  • Newcon Press
  • Salt Publishing

Best Magazine / Periodical

  • Shoreline of Infinity, ed. Noel Chidwick
  • Black Static, ed. Andy Cox (TTA Press)
  • Gingernuts of Horror, ed. Jim Mcleod
  • Grimdark Magazine, ed. Adrian Collins
  • Interzone, ed. Andy Cox (TTA Press)

Best Newcomer (the Sydney J Bounds Award)

Best Non-Fiction

  • Gender Identity and Sexuality in Science Fiction and Fantasy, ed. FT Barbini (Luna Press)
  • Gingernuts of Horror, ed. Jim Mcleod
  • Luminescent Threads, ed. Alexandra Pierce & Mimi Mondal (12th Planet Press)
  • No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters, by Ursula K Le Guin (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
  • Paperbacks from Hell: The Twisted History of 70s and 80s Horror Fiction, by Grady Hendrix (Quirk)
  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, by Maura McHugh (Electric Dreamhouse Press)

Best Novella

  • Passing Strange, by Ellen Klages (Tor.com)
  • Brother's Ruin, by Emma Newman (Tor.com)
  • Cottingley, by Alison Littlewood (Newcon Press)
  • The Murders of Molly Southbourne, by Tade Thompson (Tor.com)
  • Naming the Bones, by Laura Mauro (Dark Minds Press)
  • A Pocketful of Crows, by Joanne Harris (Gollancz)

Best Short Story

  • Looking for Laika, by Laura Mauro (in Interzone #273) (TTA Press)
  • The Anniversary, by Ruth EJ Booth (in Black Static #61) (TTA Press)
  • Four Abstracts, by Nina Allan (in New Fears) (Titan Books)
  • Illumination, by Joanne Hall (in Book of Dragons) (Kristell Ink)
  • The Little Gift, by Stephen Volk (PS Publishing)
  • Shepherd's Business, by Stephen Gallagher (in New Fears) (Titan Books)

Award controversy of 2011

In 2011, British writer Sam Stone won the British Fantasy Award but returned it three days later after editor and anthologist Stephen Jones posted a blog entry pointing out that three of the winning entries (and many of the shortlisted works) were published by Telos Publishing, a company owned by David Howe. At the time, Howe was also chair of the British Fantasy Society, British Fantasy Award coordinator, and partner of Stone.[5][9][10]

References

  1. ^ British Fantasy Awards Constitution, http://www.britishfantasysociety.org/the-british-fantasy-awards-constitution-ii/
  2. ^ "1999 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-07-22.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Edwards, Jan. "The British Fantasy Awards: a Short History". (with additions from) David Sutton. Archived from the original on 10 November 2016. Retrieved 20 June 2011.
  4. ^ Pechanec, Jan (22 August 2007). "CENY: nominace na British Fantasy Awards 2007" (in Czech). Sarden. Retrieved 20 June 2011.
  5. ^ a b Barnett, David (6 October 2011). "British Fantasy Award winner returns prize". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 October 2011.
  6. ^ "Locus Online News » 2015 British Fantasy Awards Winners". www.locusmag.com. Retrieved 2015-11-02.
  7. ^ "British Fantasy Society, British Fantasy Awards 2018". The British Fantasy Society. 6 July 2018. Retrieved 22 October 2018.
  8. ^ British Fantasy Society [@BritFantasySoc] (21 October 2018). "Hello Twitter, members of the BFS and other interested parties!" (Tweet). Retrieved 22 October 2018 – via Twitter.
  9. ^ Jones, Stephen (1 November 2011). "Putting The "Con" Into FantasyCon". Archived from the original on 7 October 2011. Retrieved 7 November 2011.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  10. ^ Paul, David (9 October 2011). "A literary spat turns ugly as the winner of award is... organiser's live-in lover". Daily Express. Retrieved 9 October 2011.

External links

Among Others

Among Others is a 2011 fantasy novel written by Welsh-Canadian writer Jo Walton, published originally by Tor Books. It is published in the UK by Corsair (Constable & Robinson). It won the 2012 Nebula Award for Best Novel, the Hugo Award for Best Novel and the British Fantasy Award, and was a nominee for the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel.

Bag of Bones

Bag of Bones is a 1998 novel by American writer Stephen King. It focuses on an author who suffers severe writer's block and delusions at an isolated lake house four years after the death of his wife. It won the Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel in 1998, and the British Fantasy Award for Best Novel in 1999. The book re-uses many basic plot elements of Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, which is directly referenced several times in the book's opening pages; however, the relation of these elements (including a wife who is dead as the book opens, her posthumous effect on future romance, a drowning, and house haunted by the memories of previous inhabitants) to the plot and characters is markedly different. When the paperback edition of Bag of Bones was published by Pocket Books on June 1, 1999 (ISBN 978-0671024239), it included a new author's note at the end of the book, in which Stephen King describes his initial three-book deal with Scribner (Bag of Bones, On Writing, and a collection of short stories titled One Headlight, which later became Everything's Eventual), and devotes most of the piece describing the origins of the then-forthcoming Hearts in Atlantis.

Black Static

Black Static, formerly The 3rd Alternative, is a British horror magazine edited by Andy Cox. The magazine has won the British Fantasy Award for "Best Magazine" while individual stories have won other awards. In addition, numerous stories published in Black Static/The 3rd Alternative have been reprinted in collections of the year's best fiction.

Black Static is published by TTA Press alongside sister publications Crimewave, which takes a similarly idiosyncratic approach to crime fiction, and the long-running science fiction magazine Interzone.

Cujo

Cujo () is a 1981 psychological horror novel by American writer Stephen King, about a rabid dog. The novel won the British Fantasy Award in 1982, and was made into a film in 1983.

Dennis Etchison

Dennis William Etchison (born March 30, 1943) is an American writer and editor of fantasy and horror fiction. Etchison refers to his own work as "rather dark, depressing, almost pathologically inward fiction about the individual in relation to the world". Stephen King has called Dennis Etchison "one hell of a fiction writer" and he has been called "the most original living horror writer in America" (The Viking-Penguin Encyclopedia of Horror and the Supernatural). While he has achieved some acclaim as a novelist, it is his work in the short story format that is especially well-regarded by critics and genre fans. He was President of Horror Writers Association from 1992 to 1994. He is a multi-award winner, having won the British Fantasy Award three times for fiction, and the World Fantasy Award for anthologies he edited.

Dying of the Light

Dying of the Light is American author George R. R. Martin's first novel, published in 1977 by Simon & Schuster. Martin's original title for this science fiction novel was After the Festival; its title was changed before its first hardcover publication. The novel was nominated for both the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1978, and the British Fantasy Award in 1979.Dying of the Light is set in the same fictional "Thousand Worlds" universe as several of Martin's other works, including Sandkings, Nightflyers, A Song for Lya, "The Way of Cross and Dragon" and the stories collected in Tuf Voyaging.

Firestarter (novel)

Firestarter is a science fiction-horror thriller novel by Stephen King, first published in September 1980. In July and August 1980, two excerpts from the novel were published in Omni. In 1981, Firestarter was nominated as Best Novel for the British Fantasy Award, Locus Poll Award, and Balrog Award. In 1984, it was adapted into a film.

The book is dedicated to author Shirley Jackson: "In Memory of Shirley Jackson, who never needed to raise her voice."

Full Dark, No Stars

Full Dark, No Stars, published in November 2010, is a collection of four novellas by American author Stephen King, all dealing with the theme of retribution. One of the novellas, 1922, is set in Hemingford Home, Nebraska, which is the home of Mother Abagail from King's epic novel The Stand (1978), the town adult Ben Hanscom moves to in It (1986), and the setting of the short story "The Last Rung on the Ladder" (1978). The collection won the 2010 Bram Stoker Award for Best Collection and was nominated for the 2011 British Fantasy Award for Best Collection. Also, 1922 was nominated for the 2011 British Fantasy Award for Best Novella.

Graham Joyce

Graham Joyce (22 October 1954 – 9 September 2014) was a British writer of speculative fiction and the recipient of numerous awards, including the O. Henry Award and the World Fantasy Award, for both his novels and short stories.

Hogfather

Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and a 1997 British Fantasy Award nominee. It was first released in 1996 and published by Victor Gollancz. It came in 137th place in The Big Read, a BBC survey of the most loved British books of all time, making it one of fifteen books by Pratchett in the Top 200.The book focuses on the absence of the Hogfather, a mythical creature akin to Father Christmas, who grants children's wishes on Hogswatchnight (December 32) and brings them presents. While Death attempts to fill in for the Hogfather, his granddaughter Susan Sto Helit tries to find and rescue the Hogfather.

Hrolf Kraki's Saga (novel)

Hrolf Kraki's Saga is a fantasy novel by American writer Poul Anderson. It was first published by Ballantine Books as the sixty-second volume of the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in October, 1973, and has been reprinted a number of times since. The novel was nominated for the British Fantasy Award in 1973.The novel is a retelling of the story of the legendary 6th century Danish king Hrolf Kraki, pulling together and reconciling narrative strands from such diverse traditional sources as the Danish historical chronicle Chronicon Lethrense, Saxo Grammaticus's Gesta Danorum, Icelandic sagas Hrólfs saga kraka, the Skjöldunga saga and the Ynglinga saga, Norse mythological poems Skáldskaparmál and Gróttasöngr, and Anglo-Saxon poems Beowulf and Widsith.

Joel Lane

Joel Lane (1963 – 26 November 2013) was a British novelist, short story writer, poet, critic and anthology editor. He received the World Fantasy Award in 2013 and the British Fantasy Award twice.

John Coulthart

John Coulthart (born 15 March 1962) is a British graphic artist, illustrator, author and designer who has produced book covers and illustrations, CD covers and posters. He is also the author of the critically acclaimed Lovecraft-inspired book The Haunter of the Dark: And Other Grotesque Visions which contains a collaboration with Alan Moore entitled The Great Old Ones that is unique to this book and also has an introduction by Alan Moore.He has been updating a daily blog entitled cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms since February 2006 and also uses Twitter.

He was nominated for a British Fantasy Award, for Best Artist, in 2005. In 2012 he won the Artist of the Year award at the World Fantasy Awards.

List of awards and nominations received by Stephen King

Stephen King is an American author of contemporary horror, supernatural fiction, suspense, science fiction, crime fiction, and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies, many of which have been adapted into feature films, miniseries, television shows, and comic books. King has published 54 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman and six non-fiction books. He has written nearly 200 short stories, most of which have been collected in book collections.

King has received multiple awards and nominations for his work, including multiple Bram Stoker Awards, World Fantasy Awards, and British Fantasy Society Awards as well as the National Medal of Arts, Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and the O. Henry Award. He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his entire oeuvre, such as the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement (2004), the Canadian Booksellers Association Lifetime Achievement Award (2007), and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America (2007).

Mike Chinn

Mike Chinn is a horror, fantasy and comics writer from Birmingham, England.

Chinn has been nominated for the British Fantasy Award for Best Collection and Best Short Story.

He created the Anglerre fantasy series and Robot Kid science fiction books for the Starblazer comic, published by D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd. Starblazer has been resurrected as a licensed role-playing game from Cubicle 7 Entertainment, entitled Starblazer Adventures. Chinn has contributed to the RPG supplement Legends of Anglerre, based on the Anglerre world and characters that he created for Starblazer.

In 1998, Midlands-based, British Fantasy Award winning publisher The Alchemy Press published their first paperback: six short stories featuring Chinn's pulp adventure heroes, Damian Paladin and adventuress Leigh Oswin, The Paladin Mandates (which was itself short listed in the 1999 British Fantasy Awards, Best Collection and Best Short Story categories. In 2017, Pro Se Productions published further adventures of Paladin and Leigh in Walkers in Shadow.

He has edited four anthologies for The Alchemy Press: Swords Against the Millennium and three volumes of The Alchemy Press Book of Pulp Heroes.

On the Far Side of the Cadillac Desert with Dead Folks

"On the Far Side of the Cadillac Desert with Dead Folks" is a 1989 zombie apocalypse novella written by American author Joe R. Lansdale. It was also adapted to a comic book series (3 issues) and a graphic novel On the Far Side With Dead Folks by Avatar Press with artwork by Timothy Truman. The novella won the 1989 Bram Stoker Award in the Long Fiction category and won the British Fantasy Award for best short story.

Paul Finch

Paul Finch is an English author and scriptwriter. He began his writing career on the British television programme The Bill. His early scripts were for children's animation. He has written over 300 short stories which have appeared in magazines, such as the All Hallows, the magazine of the Ghost Story Society and Black Static. He also edits anthologies of Horror stories with the overall title of Terror Tales. He has written variously for the books and other spin-offs from Doctor Who. He is the author of the ongoing series of DS Mark Heck Heckenberg novels.

Ramsey Campbell

Ramsey Campbell (born 4 January 1946 in Liverpool) is an English horror fiction writer, editor and critic who has been writing for well over fifty years. He is the author of over 30 novels and hundreds of short stories, many of them widely considered classics in the field. Three of his novels have been filmed, all for non-English-speaking markets.

Since he first came to prominence in the mid-1960s, critics have cited Campbell as one of the leading writers in his field: T. E. D. Klein has written that "Campbell reigns supreme in the field today", and Robert Hadji has described him as "perhaps the finest living exponent of the British weird fiction tradition", while S. T. Joshi stated, "future generations will regard him as the leading horror writer of our generation, every bit the equal of Lovecraft or Blackwood."

Stephen King bibliography

The following is a complete list of books published by Stephen King, an American author of contemporary horror, suspense, science fiction, and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies, and many of them have been adapted into feature films, television movies and comic books. King has published 59 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman, and five non-fiction books. He has written over 200 short stories, most of which have been compiled in book collections. Many of his stories are set in his home state of Maine.

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