Bristol County, Rhode Island

Bristol County is a county located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the population was 49,875,[1] making it the least populous county in Rhode Island. In terms of land area it is the third smallest county in the United States, at only 25 square miles (65 km2). The county was created in 1747 when it was separated from Bristol County, Massachusetts.[2] Bristol County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Bristol County, Rhode Island
County
Bristol RI Old Courthouse
Bristol County Courthouse in Bristol
Map of Rhode Island highlighting Bristol County

Location within the U.S. state of Rhode Island
Map of the United States highlighting Rhode Island

Rhode Island's location within the U.S.
Founded1747
SeatBristol
Largest townBristol
Area
 • Total45 sq mi (117 km2)
 • Land24 sq mi (62 km2)
 • Water21 sq mi (54 km2), 46%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)48,649
 • Density2,064/sq mi (797/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4

History

The county was formed by the transfer of part of Bristol County, Massachusetts, to the state of Rhode Island, and was the subject of a long-running border dispute.[3]

The original county was part of the Plymouth Colony and named after its "shire town" (county seat), what is now Bristol, Rhode Island. The new Rhode Island county was formed in 1746 with the full modern territory of Bristol, Barrington, and Warren.[4]

See Bristol County, Massachusetts for later land transfers between Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 45 square miles (120 km2), of which 24 square miles (62 km2) is land and 21 square miles (54 km2) (46%) is water.[5] It is the smallest county in Rhode Island. In land area only (water area omitted), it is the third-smallest county in the United States, following Kalawao County, Hawaii and New York County, New York (Manhattan), if independent cities of Virginia are not counted as counties. The highest point in the county is Mount Hope, in Bristol, which stands 217 feet (66 m) above sea level.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17903,211
18003,80118.4%
18105,07233.4%
18205,63711.1%
18305,446−3.4%
18406,47618.9%
18508,51431.5%
18608,9074.6%
18709,4215.8%
188011,39420.9%
189011,4280.3%
190013,14415.0%
191017,60233.9%
192023,11331.3%
193025,0898.5%
194025,5481.8%
195029,07913.8%
196037,14627.7%
197045,93723.7%
198046,9422.2%
199048,8594.1%
200050,6483.7%
201049,875−1.5%
Est. 201848,649[6]−2.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2018[1]

2000 census

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 50,648 people, 19,033 households, and 13,361 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,052 people per square mile (792/km²). There were 19,881 housing units at an average density of 805 per square mile (311/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.81% White, 0.69% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 1% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. 1.13% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 24.7% were of Portuguese, 18.6% Italian, 12.4% Irish, 10.5% English and 5.9% French ancestry. 85.4% spoke English, 10.4% Portuguese and 1.3% Spanish as their first language. The United States Census Bureau reported Bristol County as being one of two counties in the United States with a plurality of people of Portuguese ancestry[12] (the other being contiguous Bristol County, Massachusetts).

There were 19,033 households out of which 31.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.30% were married couples living together, 9.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.80% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.90% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 16.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,737, and the median income for a family was $63,114. Males had a median income of $41,902 versus $28,985 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,503. About 4.40% of families and 6.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.20% of those under age 18 and 9.60% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 49,875 people, 19,150 households, and 12,750 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 2,064.0 inhabitants per square mile (796.9/km2). There were 20,850 housing units at an average density of 862.8 per square mile (333.1/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 95.7% white, 1.4% Asian, 0.8% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.0% of the population.[13] The largest ancestry groups were:

  • Portugal 24.8% Portuguese
  • Republic of Ireland 22.2% Irish
  • Italy 21.0% Italian
  • England 14.5% English
  • France 9.8% French
  • Germany 8.1% German
  • Canada 4.4% French Canadian
  • Poland 4.3% Polish
  • Scotland 2.9% Scottish
  • United States 2.7% American
  • Sweden 2.4% Swedish
  • Northern Ireland 2.0% Scotch-Irish
  • Greece 1.5% Greek
  • Russia 1.4% Russian

[15]

Of the 19,150 households, 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.4% were non-families, and 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.99. The median age was 42.9 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $68,333 and the median income for a family was $87,781. Males had a median income of $59,725 versus $44,060 for females. The per capita income for the county was $35,588. About 3.5% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.2% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Communities

Map of Bristol County Rhode Island With Municipal Labels
Map of Bristol County, Rhode Island showing cities, towns, and CDPs

The following towns are located in Bristol County:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  2. ^ "Rhode Island: Individual County Chronologies". Pennsylvania Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  3. ^ "The Border is Where? Part II". The Rhode Islander: A depository of opinion, information, and pictures of the Ocean State. blogspot.com. 2007. Retrieved April 3, 2007.
  4. ^ History of Bristol County, Massachusetts with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Part 1 edited by Duane Hamilton Hurd. J.W. Lewis and Co., 1883. [1]. p. 1.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 14, 2015.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ Census 2000 Brief - Ancestry
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-06-09.

Coordinates: 41°42′N 71°17′W / 41.70°N 71.28°W

Barrington, Rhode Island

Barrington is a suburban, residential town in Bristol County, Rhode Island located approximately 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Providence. It was founded by Congregationalist separatists from Swansea, Massachusetts and incorporated in 1717.Barrington was ceded to Rhode Island and merged into Warren in 1747, though it was later made into a separate town by the Rhode Island legislature. It was a sparsely developed, agricultural community until the arrival of brickmaking companies in the 1850s, which employed large numbers of French-Canadians and Italians. The construction of a railroad to Providence in 1855 further contributed to suburban development, attracting residents of neighboring urban areas and contributing to the development of manufacturing industries. The post-World War II baby boom increased suburbanization trends, resulting in a large population increase.

Schools were constructed throughout the 1950s to accommodate this population. Three Barrington schools are National Blue Ribbon Schools, and its high school was ranked No. 189 in the United States by Newsweek in 2019. Money noted the appeal of Barrington's high test scores and relative affordability, naming it one of the best places to live in the United States.

Historical sites provide examples of architectural and suburban development during various stages of the town's history, including the Allen-West House, Barrington Civic Center Historic District, and O'Bannon Mill. Nine sites in Barrington are listed under the National Register of Historic Places.

As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 16,310.

Barrington High School (Rhode Island)

Barrington High School (formerly known as West Barrington Senior High School) is a public high school located in Barrington, a town in Bristol County, Rhode Island. Barrington High School is the singular high school of the Barrington Public Schools district, enrolling 1028 students in grades 9-12. Barrington High School's school colors are blue and gold, and its mascot is the Eagle.

During the early 1950s, Barrington's population began to grow as a result of the increasing availability of the automobile and the baby boom. Barrington High School was the first of many public schools constructed during this period to accommodate the now larger populace.

Barrington High School has been noted for academic success; U.S. News and World Report ranked Barrington as the best high school in Rhode Island. In its 2014 list of "America's Top High Schools", Newsweek ranked Barrington High School as No. 200 out of an analysis of 500 schools across the United States.

Barrington River (Rhode Island)

The Barrington River is a tidal extension of Runnins River in the U.S. states of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. It flows approximately 6 km (4 mi). There are no dams along the river's length.

Blithewold Mansion, Gardens and Arboretum

The Blithewold Mansion, Gardens and Arboretum is an arboretum of 13 hectares (32 acres), located at 101 Ferry Road, Bristol, Rhode Island, midway between Newport and Providence, Rhode Island, on Bristol Harbor with views over Narragansett Bay. It includes a mansion, with a 4 hectares (9.9 acres) lawn and over 300 species of woody plants in its arboretum and gardens, including both native and exotic species.

The Mansion and its grounds were established in the 1890s by Augustus and Bessie Van Wickle as their summer retreat. Augustus Van Wickle was from Hazleton, Pennsylvania, with a fortune in the coal-mining business and a donor of the Van Wickle gates at Brown University. Today's grounds are primarily the design of John DeWolf, and date between 1896 and 1913. The property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.Blithwold's grounds include species from North America, Europe, China and Japan. Specimen trees include magnolia (Magnolia spp.), linden (Tilia spp.), Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), Black Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica), Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides), Franklinia (Franklinia alatamaha), Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), various oaks (Quercus spp.) and beeches (Fagus spp.). Other notable trees include a weeping Pagoda Tree (Styphnolobium japonicum 'Pendula'), Hiba (Thujopsis dolobrata), Katsura (Cercidiphyllum japonicum), and Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica). The grounds also include English Yews (Taxus baccata) and Eastern Junipers (Juniperus virginiana), as well as what is claimed to be the largest Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) on the East Coast, planted in 1911, and currently about 100 feet (30 m) tall.

Blithewold's Bamboo Grove covers an area nearly the size of a tennis court, and is planted with Phyllostachys aureosulcata, the Yellow-groove bamboo, which grows to 10 metres (33 ft) tall.

Blithewold has maintained contacts with the Arnold Arboretum ever since 1926, when staff botanists visited Blithewold to see the Chinese toon tree (Toona sinensis) in flower for what was believed to be the first time in the United States.

Bristol, Rhode Island

Bristol is a town in Bristol County, Rhode Island, as well as the county seat. It is a deep-water seaport named after Bristol, England.

The population of Bristol was 22,954 at the 2010 census. Major industries include boat building and related marine industries, manufacturing, and tourism. The town's school system is united with neighboring Warren, Rhode Island. Prominent communities include Luso-Americans (Portuguese-Americans), mostly Azorean, and Italian-Americans.

Bristol Ferry Light

Bristol Ferry Light is a historic lighthouse in Bristol, Rhode Island, United States. It is located on the shores of Narragansett Bay at Bristol Point, the northern land point of Mount Hope Bay at the base of the Mount Hope Bridge.

The two-story square brick lighthouse was built in 1855, along with an attached 1 1/2 story brick keeper's house. Its use was discontinued in 1927 with the construction of the Mount Hope Bridge, and a replacement automated beacon across Ferry Road. Prior to the construction of the bridge, a ferry operated between Bristol and Aquidneck Island, and the light assisted the ferry service. The Bristol Ferry Lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988, at which time it was a private residence.

Kickamuit River

The Kickamuit River is a river in the U.S. states of Massachusetts and Rhode Island flowing approximately 7.9 miles (12.7 km).

Mount Hope Bridge

The Mount Hope Bridge is a two-lane suspension bridge spanning the Mount Hope Bay in eastern Rhode Island at one of the narrowest gaps in Narragansett Bay. The bridge connects the Rhode Island towns of Portsmouth and Bristol and is part of Route 114. Its towers are 285 feet (87 m) tall, the length of the main span is 1,200 feet (366 m), and it offers 135 feet (41 m) of clearance over high water. The total length of the bridge is 6,130 feet (1,868 m).

National Register of Historic Places listings in Barrington, Rhode Island

This is a list of Registered Historic Places in Barrington, Rhode Island, which has been transferred from and is an integral part of National Register of Historic Places listings in Bristol County, Rhode Island

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 10, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Bristol, Rhode Island

List of Registered Historic Places in Bristol, Rhode Island, which has been transferred from and is an integral part of National Register of Historic Places listings in Bristol County, Rhode Island

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 10, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Bristol County, Rhode Island

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Bristol County, Rhode Island.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Bristol County, Rhode Island, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 24 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 1 National Historic Landmark.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 10, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Warren, Rhode Island

List of Registered Historic Places in Warren, Rhode Island, which has been transferred from and is an integral part of National Register of Historic Places listings in Bristol County, Rhode Island

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 10, 2019.

Nayatt Point Light

Nayatt Point Light is a historic lighthouse in Barrington, Rhode Island.

The current light was built of brick in 1856 and contains an 1828 keeper's house. The lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Palmer River (Massachusetts–Rhode Island)

The Palmer River is a river in the U.S. states of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. It flows approximately 17 km (11 mi).

Rhode Island's 1st congressional district

Rhode Island's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. It includes all of Bristol and Newport counties, along with parts of Providence County, including most of the city of Providence.

The district is currently represented by Democrat David Cicilline. In 2010, it was the least populous congressional district in the country.

Roger Williams University

Roger Williams University (RWU) is a private liberal arts university in Bristol, Rhode Island. Founded in 1956, it was named for theologian and Rhode Island cofounder Roger Williams. The school enrolls over 5,000 students and employs over 480 academic staff.

Spar Island (Rhode Island)

Spar Island is a small sandbar in Mount Hope Bay in eastern Rhode Island. The island is more or less a sand bar, and is made up entirely of an intertidal zone. A small portion is visible at high tide, expanding by about 4 times that size at low tide.

Warren, Rhode Island

Warren is a town in Bristol County, Rhode Island. The population was 10,611 at the 2010 census.

Warren River

The Warren River is a tidal extension of the Palmer River in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. It flows approximately 6.5 km (4 mi). There are no dams along the river's length.

Places adjacent to Bristol County, Rhode Island
Municipalities and communities of Bristol County, Rhode Island, United States
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