Bristol City Council

Bristol City Council is the local authority of Bristol, England. The council is a unitary authority, and is unusual in the United Kingdom in that its executive function is controlled by a directly elected mayor of Bristol. Bristol has 35 wards, electing a total of 70 councillors.[3]

Bristol City Council
Executive mayor elected every four years
Full council election every 4 years.[1] Formerly a third elected three years out of four until 2016.
Bristol City Council logo
Council logo
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 1974
Leadership
Marvin Rees, Labour
since 7 May 2016
Cllr Cleo Lake, Green Party
since 23 May 2017
Structure
Seats1 executive mayor
70 councillors
UK Bristol City Council 2016
Council political groups
     Labour (36)
     Conservative (15)
     Green (11)
     Liberal Democrat (7)
     Independent (1)
Elections
Plurality-at-large
Supplementary vote
Council last election
5 May 2016 (all councillors)
Mayor last election
5 May 2016
Council next election
2020 (all councillors)[2]
Mayor next election
2020
Motto
Virtute et Industria (By Virtue and Industry)
Meeting place
Bristol Council House - geograph.org.uk - 197619
City Hall, College Green, Bristol
Website
www.bristol.gov.uk

History

The council was formed by the Local Government Act 1972. It was first elected in 1973, a year before formally coming into its powers and prior to the creation of the non-metropolitan district of Bristol on 1 April 1974.

It was envisaged through the Local Government Act 1972 that Bristol as a non-metropolitan district council would share power with the Avon County Council. This arrangement lasted until 1996 when Avon County Council was abolished and Bristol City Council gained responsibility for services that had been provided by the county council.

Political composition

Mayor

The mayor of Bristol following the 2016 mayoral election is Marvin Rees for the Labour Party. Rees had previously ran in the first Bristol mayoral election, coming second place to the independent George Ferguson.

Councillors

Following the 2016 local elections the Labour Party secured an overall majority, gaining the council from no overall control, the first time that Labour has overall control of Bristol City Council since 2003.

Party Councillors
Labour 36
Conservative 15
Green 11
Liberal Democrats 7
Independent 1

Current councillors

Ward Party Councillor
Ashley Green Jude English
Labour Mike Davies
Labour Carole Johnson
Avonmouth & Lawrence Weston Labour Donald Alexander
Conservative Matt Melias
Labour Jo Sergeant
Bedminster Labour Celia Phipps
Labour Mark Bradshaw
Bishopston & Ashley Down Labour Tom Brook
Green Eleanor Combley
Bishopsworth Conservative Richard Eddy
Conservative Kevin Quarterly
Brislington East Conservative Tony Carey
Labour Mike Langley
Brislington West Labour Harriet Bradley
Liberal Democrats Jos Clark
Bristol Central Labour Kye Dudd
Labour Paul Smith
Clifton Green Paula O'Rourke
Green Jerome Thomas
Clifton Down Green Carla Denyer
Green Clive Stevens
Cotham Green Cleo Lake
Liberal Democrats Anthony Negus
Easton Labour Ruth Pickersgill
Labour Afzal Shah
Eastville Independent Sultan Khan
Labour Mhairi Threlfall
Filwood Labour Chris Jackson
Labour Jeff Lovell
Frome Vale Conservative Lesley Alexander
Labour Nicola Bowden-Jones
Hartcliffe & Withywood Labour Mark Brain
Labour Helen Holland
Labour Paul Goggin
Henbury & Brentry Conservative Chris Windows
Conservative Mark Weston
Hengrove & Whitchurch Park Liberal Democrats Tim Kent
Liberal Democrats Harriet Clough
Labour Barry Clark
Hillfields Labour Craig Cheney
Labour Anna Keen
Horfield Conservative Claire Hiscott
Labour Olly Mead
Hotwells & Harbourside Liberal Democrats Mark Wright
Knowle Liberal Democrats Chris Davies
Liberal Democrats Gary Hopkins
Lawrence Hill Labour Marg Hickman
Labour Hibaq Jama
Lockleaze Labour Gill Kirk
Labour Estella Tincknell
Redland Green Martin Fodor
Green Fi Hance
Southmead Labour Brenda Massey
Labour Helen Godwin
Southville Green Charlie Bolton
Green Stephen Clarke
St George Central Labour Nicola Beech
Labour Steve Pearce
St George Troopers Hill Labour Fabian Breckels
St George West Labour Asher Craig
Stockwood Conservative Steve Jones
Conservative Graham Morris
Stoke Bishop Conservative Peter Abraham
Conservative John Goulandris
Westbury-on-Trym & Henleaze Conservative Steve Smith
Conservative Geoff Gollop
Conservative Liz Radford
Windmill Hill Labour Jon Wellington
Labour Lucy Whittle

See also

References

  1. ^ Bristol City Council
  2. ^ Bristol City Council
  3. ^ Bristol City Council
1986 Bristol City Council election

The 1986 Bristol City Council election took place on 8 May 1986 to elect members of Bristol City Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. One third of seats in the 1986 Council Elections in the English city of Bristol were up for election. The election in Brislington West was a by-election. There was a small swing away from the Conservatives and Labour regained a majority on the Council, which they kept until 2003.

1990 Bristol City Council election

The 1990 Bristol City Council election took place on 3 May 1990 to elect members of Bristol City Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. One third of seats were up for election. There were by-elections in Brislington East and Easton. As Easton also had an election in the usual schedule, 2 seats were elected in that ward. There was a significant swing against the Liberal Democrats, largely as a result of the post-merger chaos that the party suffered.

1994 Bristol City Council election

The 1994 Bristol City Council election took place on 5 May 1994 to elect members of Bristol City Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. One third of seats were up for election. The Bristol Party was formed by Bristol Rovers fans to campaign for a new stadium for the club. There was a general swing from the Conservatives and Greens to the Liberal Democrats, reflecting the beginning of the Conservative decline nationally and also the Liberal Democrat recovery after the merger troubles.

1995 Bristol City Council election

The 1995 Bristol City Council election took place on 4 May 1995 with all seats being up for election, in preparation for Bristol City Council becoming a Unitary Authority following the abolition of Avon County Council. The same ward boundaries were used, however these are elections to a new authority and cannot be considered gains or losses compared to previously held seats.

The election saw national issues, such as the unpopularity of the national Conservative government and the state of the economy, being the major issues in the election. The Conservative candidates branded themselves as 'Bristol Conservatives', which was seen as an attempt to distance themselves from the national government. The Labour Party was expected to win a large majority but they were criticised by the Conservatives for cutting money from the Scouts while giving money to a lesbian/bisexual women's group.Labour easily gained a majority and as predicted before the election the Liberal Democrats became the second largest party on the council driving the Conservatives down to third as compared to the previous district council.

1998 Bristol City Council election

Elections to the Bristol City Council were held on 7 May 1998 as part of the 1998 United Kingdom local elections. 22 wards were contested.

1999 Bristol City Council election

The 1999 Bristol City Council election took place on 6 May 1999, on the same day as other local elections. All seats were up for election due to boundary changes, with each ward electing 2 councillors. The total number of seats on the council increased by 2 due to the creation of a new ward: Clifton East.Despite losing seats to both the Liberal Democrats and the Conservatives, the Labour Party maintained control of the council with a slim overall majority.

2002 Bristol City Council election

The 2002 Bristol City Council election took place on 2 May 2002, on the same day as other local elections. Despite suffering some losses, the Labour Party managed to retain a slim majority.

2003 Bristol City Council election

The 2003 Bristol City Council election took place on 1 May 2003, on the same day as other local elections in the UK. The Labour Party made a number of losses, mainly to the Liberal Democrats, and lost overall control of the council. Loses included Council leader Diane Bunyan, who lost her Windmill Hill seat to the Liberal Democrats. This year also saw elections contested by the new Bristolian Party, founded by the local 'scandal sheet' The Bristolian, though they failed to win any seats.

2006 Bristol City Council election

The 2006 Bristol City Council election took place on 4 May 2006, on the same day as other local elections. The Labour Party continued to lose seats, but the Liberal Democrats failed to gain enough to form an overall majority. This election saw the first election of a Green Councillor to Bristol City Council – the first time four parties had been represented since the Council’s creation.

2007 Bristol City Council election

The 2007 Bristol City Council election took place on 3 May 2007, on the same day as other local elections. The Liberal Democrats lost 2 seats to Labour, but remained the largest party on the Council. No party gained overall control.

2011 Bristol City Council election

The 2011 Bristol City Council elections were held on Thursday 5 May 2011, for 24 seats, that being one third of the total number of councillors. The Liberal Democrats, who had won overall control of the council in 2009 and increased their majority in 2010, experienced a drop in support and lost 5 seats; 4 to the Labour Party and 1 to the Green Party, which gained its second ever council seat in Bristol. This meant that the Lib Dems no longer had a majority on the council. However, they continued to run the council, relying on opposition groups to vote through any proposal.

2013 Bristol City Council election

Elections for one third (23 seats) of Bristol City Council were held on 2 May 2013 as part of the 2013 United Kingdom local elections. No party gained overall control.

The Liberal Democrats, who had been the largest party on the council, lost 10 seats and conceded largest party status to Labour. The Green Party also gained 2 new seats, whilst Independents for Bristol gained their first seat on the Council.

2014 Bristol City Council election

The 2014 Bristol City Council election took place on 22 May 2014 to elect members of Bristol City Council in England, as part of the United Kingdom 2014 Local Elections.214,544 people were eligible to vote in the elections, of which 58,907 turned out to do so. Consequently, overall turnout was 27.5%.

2015 Bristol City Council election

The 2015 Bristol City Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect members of Bristol City Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

In March 2015, the only Independent Councillor on Bristol City Council joined the Conservatives. This meant that the Conservatives increased their number of seats from the previous Council despite making no gains in the May election.

Bristol City Council elections

Bristol is a unitary authority and ceremonial county in England. Until 1 April 1996 it was a non-metropolitan district in Avon. Since 2012 it has also had a directly elected mayor.

Mayor of Bristol

The Mayor of Bristol is the head of Bristol City Council. The Mayor is an elected politician who, along with the 70 members of Bristol City Council, is responsible for the strategic government of the city of Bristol, England. The role was created after a local referendum held on 3 May 2012, which followed the passage of the Localism Act 2011. 41,032 voted for an elected mayor and 35,880 voted against, with a turnout of 24%. An election for the new post was held on 15 November 2012.The current Mayor is Marvin Rees, elected on 5 May 2016.

The post of Lord Mayor of Bristol is a separate office, elected each May by city councillors and taking office on 29 September for a one-year period. The Lord Mayor chairs Council meetings and performs ceremonial functions in the city.

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