Brimstone Creek

Brimstone Creek is a river in Schoharie County and Montogomery County in New York. It begins east of the Village of Sharon Springs and flows mostly in a northwest direction before flowing into Canajoharie Creek north-northwest of the Village of Ames.

Brimstone Creek
BrimstoneCreekNY
Brimstone Creek west of the Village of Ames. Budd Hill is in the background.
Brimstone Creek is located in New York Adirondack Park
Brimstone Creek
Location of the mouth within New York
Brimstone Creek is located in the United States
Brimstone Creek
Brimstone Creek (the United States)
Location
CountryUnited States
StateNew York
RegionCentral New York Region
CountiesSchoharie, Montgomery
TownsSharon, Canajoharie
Physical characteristics
Source 
 ⁃ locationEast of Sharon Springs
 ⁃ coordinates42°47′47″N 74°34′19″W / 42.7963889°N 74.5719444°W
MouthCanajoharie Creek
 ⁃ location
North-northwest of Ames
 ⁃ coordinates
42°50′48″N 74°36′28″W / 42.8467403°N 74.6076415°WCoordinates: 42°50′48″N 74°36′28″W / 42.8467403°N 74.6076415°W[1]
 ⁃ elevation
676 ft (206 m)
Basin size14.9 sq mi (39 km2)[2]

References

  1. ^ "Brimstone Creek". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2018-05-23.
  2. ^ "USGS 0134909505 BRIMSTONE CREEK AT MOUTH AT AMES NY". waterdata.usgs.gov. waterdata.usgs.gov. May 23, 2019. Retrieved 23 May 2019. data
Canajoharie Creek

The Canajoharie Creek () is a river that flows into the Mohawk River in the Village of Canajoharie in the U.S. State of New York. The name "Canajoharie" is said to be a Mohawk language term meaning "the pot that washes itself," referring to the "Canajoharie Boiling Pot," a 20 feet (6.1 m) wide and 10 feet (3.0 m) deep pothole in the Canajoharie Creek, just south of the Village of Canajoharie. Bowmans Creek is one main tributary that enters the creek east of the Hamlet of Sprout Brook. The other main tributary is Brimstone Creek which enters the creek north-northwest of the Village of Ames.

Cohoes Falls

Cohoes Falls [Kahon:ios, Mohawk for "Canoe Falls"] is a waterfall on the Mohawk River shared by the city of Cohoes and the town of Waterford, New York, United States. Discovered by the indigenous people, the falls were called Ga-ha-oose or Ga-ho'n'-yoos by the Mohawks, which is believed to mean "The Place of the Falling Canoe." Cohoes historian Arthur Masten wrote in his 1880 history that the phrase might mean "Potholes in the River," referring to the potholes that appear in the riverbed when it is dry. In the oral tradition of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), the Cohoes Falls are the site where The Great Peacemaker, performed a feat of supernatural strength, convincing the Mohawk people to become the founders of the Iroquois League of Nations or Confederacy. Some historians believe the Mohawks launched the Confederacy as early as 1142 CE, though other experts report dates ranging from 1450-1650.

Celebrated by 18th-century travelers in letters and journals, the Cohoes Falls, also called The Great Falls of the Mohawk, were regarded as the second-most beautiful cataract in New York State after Niagara. In 1804, the national poet of Ireland, Thomas Moore, visited Cohoes and wrote a paean to the waterfall's beauty: "Lines Written at the Cohos, or Falls of the Mohawk River."

In 1831, town leaders built a dam across the Mohawk River to harness the power of the falls to fuel the turbines of the city's burgeoning textile industry. Over the next several decades, the predominant company, Harmony Mills, became the largest manufacturer of cotton in the United States, thanks to its control of local water rights. When all the mills closed in the wake of the Great Depression, city leaders neglected the potential of the falls for tourism. They leased the flow rights to a series of power companies, including Niagara Mohawk and Orion Power.

The Erie Canal was planned to overcome the navigational barrier of the Cohoes Falls. The original "Clinton's Ditch", the Erie Canal of 1825, was built through the city of Cohoes. The later Enlarged Canal was realigned, yet still went through the City of Cohoes. The Barge Canal, which opened in 1918, bypasses Cohoes and runs though the Village of Waterford via the Waterford Flight of Locks.

The Cohoes Falls is 90 feet (28 m) high and 1,000 feet (305 m) wide. Its flow is most impressive in springtime, sometimes running at 90,000 cubic feet (2,500 m3) of water per second, but as the season changes, there is less water for the falls because so much of the flow is diverted at the Crescent Dam to the Barge Canal through Lock 6. Most of the water is still diverted for power generation; some is diverted for the Cohoes water supply. During the summer, the falls are virtually dry, revealing shale rock formations that have their own distinctive beauty. The 87-year average flow of the Mohawk River at Cohoes is 34,638 cubic feet per second, but this includes water diverted to the power plant and Erie Canal locks.

East River

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City. The waterway, which is actually not a river despite its name, connects Upper New York Bay on its south end to Long Island Sound on its north end. It separates the borough of Queens on Long Island from the Bronx on the North American mainland, and also divides Manhattan from Queens and Brooklyn, which are also on Long Island. Because of its connection to Long Island Sound, it was once also known as the Sound River. The tidal strait changes its direction of flow frequently, and is subject to strong fluctuations in its current, which are accentuated by its narrowness and variety of depths. The waterway is navigable for its entire length of 16 miles (26 km), and was historically the center of maritime activities in the city, although that is no longer the case.

Liard River

The Liard River of the North American boreal forest flows through Yukon, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories, Canada. Rising in the Saint Cyr Range of the Pelly Mountains in southeastern Yukon, it flows 1,115 kilometres (693 mi) southeast through British Columbia, marking the northern end of the Rocky Mountains and then curving northeast back into Yukon and Northwest Territories, draining into the Mackenzie River at Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories. The river drains approximately 277,100 square kilometres (107,000 sq mi) of boreal forest and muskeg.

The Palisades (Hudson River)

The Palisades, also called the New Jersey Palisades or the Hudson River Palisades, are a line of steep cliffs along the west side of the lower Hudson River in Northeastern New Jersey and Southeastern New York in the United States. The cliffs stretch north from Jersey City about 20 miles (32 km) to near Nyack, New York, and visible at Haverstraw, New York. They rise nearly vertically from near the edge of the river, and are about 300 feet (90 m) high at Weehawken, increasing gradually to 540 feet (160 m) high near their northern terminus. North of Fort Lee, the Palisades are part of Palisades Interstate Park and are a National Natural Landmark.The Palisades are among the most dramatic geologic features in the vicinity of New York City, forming a canyon of the Hudson north of the George Washington Bridge, as well as providing a vista of the Manhattan skyline. They sit in the Newark Basin, a rift basin located mostly in New Jersey.

Palisade is derived from the same root as the word pale, ultimately from the Latin word palus, meaning stake. A "palisade" is, in general, a defensive fence or wall made up of wooden stakes or tree trunks. The Lenape called the cliffs "rocks that look like rows of trees", a phrase that became "Weehawken", the name of a town in New Jersey that sits at the top of the cliffs across from Midtown Manhattan.

Hudson River watershed
Tributaries
Lakes
Towns
Landmarks

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