Brighton and Hove City Council

Brighton and Hove City Council is the local authority of the city of Brighton and Hove. It is a unitary authority, having the powers of a non-metropolitan county and district council combined. It provides a full range of local government services including Council Tax billing, libraries, social services, processing planning applications, waste collection and disposal, and it is a local education authority.

Brighton and Hove City Council
Arms of Brighton and Hove City Council
Coat of arms
Brighton and Hove City Council logo
Corporate Logo
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 1997
Preceded byEast Sussex County Council
Leadership
Mayor of Brighton & Hove
Cllr Alexandra Phillips
since 22nd May 2019
Leader of the council
Cllr Daniel Yates, Labour
since 23rd April 2018
Leader of the opposition
Cllr Steve Bell CBE, Conservative
Convenor of the Green Group
Cllr Phelim MacCafferty, Green
Chief Executive
Geoffrey Raw
Structure
Seats54 councillors
Brighton and Hove City Council composition
Political groups
Administration
     Labour (20)
Other parties
     Green (19)
     Conservative (14)
     Independent (1)[1]
Joint committees
Greater Brighton City Board
Length of term
4 years
Elections
First past the post, multi-member
Last election
2 May 2019
Next election
May 2023
Meeting place
Brighton Town Hall
Hove Town Hall
Website
www.brighton-hove.gov.uk

Powers and functions

The local authority derives its powers and functions from the Local Government Act 1972 and subsequent legislation. For the purposes of local government, Brighton and Hove is within a non-metropolitan area of England. As a unitary authority, Brighton and Hove City Council has the powers and functions of both a non-metropolitan county and district council combined. In its capacity as a district council it is a billing authority collecting Council Tax and business rates, it processes local planning applications, it is responsible for housing, waste collection and environmental health. In its capacity as a county council it is a local education authority, responsible for social services, libraries and waste disposal.

Political control

Since the first election to the council in 1996 political control of the council has been held by the following parties:[2]

Party in control Party in minority lead
Labour 1996–2003
No overall control 2003–present Labour 2003–2007
Conservative 2007–2011
Green 2011–2015
Labour 2015–present *

The Green led council from 2011-2015 was the first of its kind in the United Kingdom.[3]

Councillors and wards

When Brighton Borough Council and Hove Borough Council merged in 1996 the wards were carried over from the respective councils who had both been under East Sussex County Council.

There were originally 26 Wards each with three councillors totally 78 councillors in the newly created Brighton and Hove Borough Council: Brunswick and Adelaide, Goldsmid, Hangleton, Hanover, Hollingbury, Kings Cliff, Marine, Moulsecoomb, Nevill, North Portslade, Patcham, Portslade South, Preston, Queens Park, Regency, Rottingdean, Seven Dials, St. Peters, Stanford, Stanmer, Tenantry, Vallance, Westbourne, Westdene, Wish, Woodingdean

Wardsold(names)
Ward of Brighton and Hove Borough Council 1996 - 2003

The 2001 boundary review [4][5][6] reduced the wards to 21 Wards with a mix of two or three councillors each totalling 54 councillors for the then city council. These boundary were used in the 2003 election for the first time with the following wards: Brunswick and Adelaide, Central Hove, East Brighton, Goldsmid, Hangleton and Knoll, Hanover and Elm Grove, Hollingbury and Stanmer (which then became Hollingdean and Stanmer in 2007), Stanford (which became Hove Park in 2007), Moulsecoomb and Bevendean, North Portslade, Patcham, Preston Park, Queen's Park, Regency, Rottingdean Coastal, South Portslade, St Peter's and North Laine, Westbourne, Wish, Withdean, Woodingdean.

Brighton and Hove City Council election 2003 map
Results of the 2003 elections with new ward boundaries

List of Brighton and Hove City Councillors by ward:[7]

Councillor Party Ward Elected Notes
Phelim Mac Cafferty Green Party of England and Wales Brunswick & Adelaide 2011 Convener of the Green Group
Hannah Clare Green Party of England and Wales Brunswick & Adelaide 2019 Deputy convenor of the Green group
Clare Moonan Labour and Co-operative Central Hove 2015
Gary Wilkinson Labour and Co-operative Central Hove 2019
Gill Williams Labour and Co-operative East Brighton 2019
Nichole Brennan Labour and Co-operative East Brighton 2019
Nancy Platts Labour and Co-operative East Brighton 2018 Lead Member for Economic Development and Social Value
John Allcock Labour and Co-operative Goldsmid 2019
Marianna Ebel Green Party of England and Wales Goldsmid 2019
Jackie O'Quinn Labour and Co-operative Goldsmid 2015 Chair of the Licensing Committee
Dawn Barnett Conservative Party Hangleton & Knoll 2007
Tony Janio Conservative Party Hangleton & Knoll 2007
Nick Lewry Conservative Party Hangleton & Knoll 2015
David Gibson Green Party of England and Wales Hanover & Elm Grove 2015
Elaine Hills Green Party of England and Wales Hanover & Elm Grove 2019
Steph Powell Green Party of England and Wales Hanover & Elm Grove 2019
Tracey Hill Labour and Co-operative Hollingdean & Stanmer 2015
Theresa Fowler Labour and Co-operative Hollingdean & Stanmer 2019
Martin Osborne Green Party of England and Wales Hollingdean & Stanmer 2019
Samer Bagaeen Conservative Party Hove Park 2019
Vanessa Brown Conservative Party Hove Park 2003
Amanda Grinshaw Labour and Co-operative Moulsecoomb & Bevendean 2019
Kate Knight Labour and Co-operative Moulsecoomb & Bevendean 2019
Daniel Yates Labour and Co-operative Moulsecoomb & Bevendean 2015 Leader of the Labour & Co-operative Group
Chair of the Policy, Resources and Growth Committee
Peter Atkinson Labour and Co-operative North Portslade 2015
Anne Pissaridou Labour and Co-operative North Portslade 2019
Carol Theobald Conservative Party Patcham 2003
Alistair McNair Conservative Party Patcham 2019
Lee Wares Conservative Party Patcham 2015 Deputy Leader of the Conservative Group
Amy Heley Green Party of England and Wales Preston Park 2019
Siriol Hugh-Jones Green Party of England and Wales Preston Park 2019
Leo Littman Green Party of England and Wales Preston Park 2011
Clare Rainey Green Party of England and Wales Queen's Park 2019
Amanda Evans Labour and Co-operative Queen's Park 2019
Nick Childs Labour and Co-operative Queen's Park 2019
Tom Druitt Green Party of England and Wales Regency 2015
Alex Phillips Green Party of England and Wales Regency 2009 Deputy Mayor
Bridget Helen Fishleigh Independent Rottingdean Coastal 2019
Mary Mears Conservative Party Rottingdean Coastal 2003 Deputy leader of the Conservative group
Joe Miller Conservative Party Rottingdean Coastal 2015 Chair of Audit & Standards Committee
Les Hamilton Labour and Co-operative South Portslade 2003 Deputy Chair of the Policy, Resources & Growth Committee
Alan Robins Labour and Co-operative South Portslade 2015 Chair of the Economic Development & Culture Committee
Lizzie Deane Green Party of England and Wales St Peter's & North Laine 2010 Deputy Convener of the Green Group
Sue Shanks Green Party of England and Wales St Peter's & North Laine 2019
Pete West Green Party of England and Wales St Peter's & North Laine 1996
Carmen Appich Labour and Co-operative Westbourne 2019
Chris Henry Labour and Co-operative Westbourne 2019
Robert Nemeth Conservative Party Wish 2015
Garry Peltzer Dunn Conservative Party Wish 2003
Sarah Nield Green Party of England and Wales Withdean 2019
Steve Davis Green Party of England and Wales Withdean 2019
Jamie Lloyd Green Party of England and Wales Withdean 2019
Steve Bell Conservative Party Woodingdean 2015 Leader of the Conservative Group
Dee Simson Conservative Party Woodingdean 2003 Mayor

Future structure

In October 2017, it was announced that the city council was to merge with Brighton and Hove Clinical Commissioning Group to form a Health and Social Care Integration Board: the merge, commencing in April 2018 and culminating in a full merger a year later, is intended to prevent the duplication of work and streamline provision of health and social care within the city.[8]

References

  1. ^ https://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/politics/two-brighton-and-hove-councillors-join-the-independent-group-1-8823801
  2. ^ "Brighton & Hove". BBC News Online. Retrieved 8 October 2009.
  3. ^ "Go Green for first Green-led council in UK". www.greenparty.org.uk. Retrieved 2016-12-20.
  4. ^ legislation.gov.uk - The City of Brighton and Hove (Electoral Changes) Order 2001. Retrieved on 4 October 2015.
  5. ^ "Your Local Councillors". Brighton & Hove City Council. Archived from the original on 30 January 2009. Retrieved 8 October 2009.
  6. ^ "Councillors & Meetings". Brighton & Hove City Council. Archived from the original on 25 August 2009. Retrieved 8 October 2009.
  7. ^ https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/council-and-democracy/councillors-and-committees
  8. ^ le Duc, Frank (12 October 2017). "Brighton and Hove council to merge with NHS commissioning body". Brighton and Hove News.
2011 Brighton and Hove City Council election

Elections to Brighton and Hove City Council were held on 5 May 2011, in line with other local elections in the United Kingdom. The whole council, a unitary authority, was up for election with 54 councillors elected from 21 wards.

The Green Party made significant gains, overtaking the Conservatives to become the largest party with 23 seats, the largest Green group on any council. The Greens gained seats at the expense of all three other parties, taking the only ward previously in Liberal Democrat hands. The Conservatives lost not only to the Greens but to Labour Co-op candidates in different parts of the city.The Greens, Conservatives and Labour Co-op fielded candidates for every seat on the council. The Liberal Democrats contested all but one ward. The UK Independence Party, European Citizens Party and Trade Unionists and Socialists Against Cuts also fielded candidates. In addition, there were six independents standing, including re-standing councillor and former Liberal Democrat David Watkins.Following the election the Labour Co-operative group rejected the possibility of forming a coalition with the Green Party, who then went on to form the first ever Green council administration in the UK, as a minority administration. As of 2018, it is the most recent local authority election in which the Green Party of England and Wales won the most votes and seats.

Following the election, the composition of the council was as follows:

Green: 23

Conservative: 18

Labour: 13

2015 Brighton and Hove City Council election

The 2015 Brighton and Hove City Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect members of Brighton and Hove City Council in England. This is on the same day as the general election and other local elections.

The election saw the Green party lose their minority control of the council. The party had gained control of the council from the Conservative party following the previous election, with the party elected on a promise to resist cuts from central government. During the administration however the council was faced with cuts of up to £80 million.Other issues faced by the party included internal disputes, which had seen several attempts to remove Green party leader (and leader of Brighton & Hove Council), Jason Kitcat. In one prominent incident the Green administration faced a strike by the city's binmen, following changes to their allowances. The strike, undertaken during the summer, saw refuse go uncollected. The Green administration split over the strike, with several Green councillors (alongside Brighton Pavilion MP Caroline Lucas), including Kitcat's deputy, siding with the binmen.

2019 Brighton and Hove City Council election

Elections to Brighton and Hove City Council election took place on 2 May 2019, electing all 54 members of the council, alongside other local elections in England and Northern Ireland.The Labour Party lost 3 seats compared to the last election in 2015 but recovered its place as the largest party on the council, having seen its numbers reduced from 23 to 19 over the four years following 2015, while the strength of the Conservative group had been increased by one member in 2019, as a Labour councillor had changed allegiance shortly before the election. In addition to Labour and the Conservatives, the Green Party, which was in minority control from 2011 to 2015, fielded candidates for every seat on the council at this election.

Other parties contesting were the Liberal Democrats, the Women's Equality Party (for the first time in the city, with two candidates) and United Kingdom Independence Party, together with a number of independent candidates.

Baldwin v Brighton City Council

Baldwin v Brighton and Hove City Council [2007] IRLR 232 is a UK labour law case, concerning gender discrimination and the implied term of mutual trust and confidence.

Benfield Hill

Benfield Hill is an 11.8-hectare (29-acre) Local Nature Reserve on the northern outskirts of Hove in East Sussex. It is owned and managed by Brighton and Hove City Council.This area of grassland and scrub is on south and east facing slopes. There are many glow-worms.

Brighton and Hove City Council elections

Brighton and Hove City Council is a unitary authority in East Sussex, England. It was created as Brighton and Hove Borough Council on 1 April 1997 replacing Brighton and Hove Borough Councils. It was granted city status in 2001.

King Alfred leisure centre

The King Alfred Leisure Centre, owned by Brighton and Hove City Council and operated by Freedom Leisure, is the largest wet and dry sport centre in the city of Brighton and Hove and is situated on Hove sea front.

Kings House, Hove

Kings House is a Grade II listed building in Hove that is currently used as offices by Brighton and Hove City Council. It is situated in Grand Avenue.

Ladies Mile, Brighton

Ladies Mile is a 13.6-hectare (34-acre) Local Nature Reserve on the northern outskirts of Brighton in East Sussex. It is owned and managed by Brighton and Hove City Council.This grassland site has extensive areas of horseshoe vetch and kidney vetch. There are also areas of scrub and a wood at the southern end.There is access from Ladies Mile Road.

Libraries in Brighton and Hove

The English coastal city of Brighton and Hove has a long and varied history of libraries going back over 250 years. Subscription libraries were among the earliest buildings in the resort of Brighton, which developed in the late 18th century; by the 1780s these facilities, which were more like social clubs than conventional book-borrowing venues, were at the heart of the town's social scene. The Brighton Literary Society, its successor the Brighton Royal Literary and Scientific Institution and its rival the Sussex Scientific Institution between them established a "very fine collection" of publications by the mid-19th century, and these books were donated to the town when a public library was founded in 1871. Neighbouring Hove, originally a separate village, established its own public library in 1890.

Public libraries in the city are run by the Royal Pavilion, Museums and Libraries department of Brighton and Hove City Council. Branch libraries operate in the outlying villages and suburbs of Coldean, Hangleton, Hollingbury, Mile Oak, Moulsecoomb, Patcham, Portslade, Rottingdean, Saltdean, Westdene, Whitehawk and Woodingdean. The Brighton and Hove Toy Library is at the Whitehawk Library, rebuilt and reopened in 2011. The city council also operated a mobile library until 2013. Library membership is not limited to residents of the city, and gives borrowing rights at libraries throughout the city. Free internet access was introduced in 2001.Nationally, libraries have experienced declining usage and funding cuts in recent decades, but Brighton and Hove's libraries have seen significant investment in the 21st century. Jubilee Library in central Brighton was opened in March 2005 to replace outdated split-site facilities nearby, which included a separate music library. It is England's sixth busiest: about 1 million people visited in 2009. New branch libraries have been built in the Coldean, Mile Oak, Whitehawk and Woodingdean suburbs, either as standalone buildings or as part of other community facilities.

Pepper Pot, Brighton

The Pepper Pot, also known as the Pepperpot, the Pepper Box or simply The Tower, is a listed building in the Queen's Park area of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Designed and built in 1830 by architect Charles Barry in the grounds of a villa built for the owner of Queen's Park, it survived the villa's demolition and is now one of its only surviving remnants. Its original purpose is unknown—several possible explanations have been given for its construction—and it has had a wide variety of uses in the 20th century. It is now owned by Brighton and Hove City Council, and is protected as a Grade II listed building.

Preston Barracks

Preston Barracks was a military installation in Lewes Road, Preston, Brighton.

Preston Park, Brighton

Preston Park is a park near Preston Village in the city of Brighton and Hove, East Sussex, England. It is located in Preston Park ward to the north of the centre of Brighton, and served by the nearby Preston Park railway station. Preston Park is also one of the wards of Brighton and Hove City Council. The population as of the 2011 census was 14,911.

Whitehawk Hill

Whitehawk Hill is a 50.3-hectare (124-acre) Local Nature Reserve in Brighton in East Sussex. It is owned and managed by Brighton and Hove City Council. Part of it is Whitehawk Camp, a Neolithic causewayed enclosure which is a Scheduled Monument.This is species-rich chalk grassland which has views over Brighton and the sea, together with the Isle of Wight on clear days. There are colonies of chalkhill blue butterflies.On the Whitehawk Hill there is a 45 meter high radio mast.

Wild Park

Wild Park is a 239.8-hectare (593-acre) Local Nature Reserve in Brighton in East Sussex. It is owned and managed by Brighton and Hove City Council. It includes Hollingbury Castle, an Iron Age hillfort which is a Scheduled Monument, and Hollingbury Park golf course.

The park has views over Brighton. Species-rich chalk grassland is managed by sheep grazing. There is also extensive woodland with a network of footpaths, large areas of scrub and a dew pond.

Withdean and Westdene Woods

Withdean and Westdene Woods is a 7.9-hectare (20-acre) Local Nature Reserve in four separate areas in Brighton in East Sussex. Most of the site is owned and managed by Brighton and Hove City Council. Withdean Woods is a 1-hectare (2.5-acre) nature reserve managed by the Sussex Wildlife Trust.Many of the mature trees on this site were destroyed by the Great Storm of 1987, but it still has a range of mammals including foxes, badgers and common pipistrelle bats, while there are birds such as great spotted woodpecker and firecrests.

Districts
Councils
Local elections
Local authorities in East Sussex
County council and unitary
District councils
Topics
Events
Culture
Politics
Transport
Media
Sport
Buildings
Parks
Areas

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.