Bright giant

The luminosity class II in the Yerkes spectral classification is given to bright giants. These are stars which straddle the boundary between ordinary giants and supergiants, based on the appearance of their spectra.[1]

HR-diag-no-text-2

Example bright giants

Well known stars which are classified as bright giants include:

See also

References

  1. ^ Abt, Helmut A. (1957). "Line Broadening in High-Luminosity Stars. I. Bright Giants". Astrophysical Journal. 126: 503. Bibcode:1957ApJ...126..503A. doi:10.1086/146423.
19 Aurigae

19 Aurigae is a single star located approximately 3,600 light years away from the Sun in the northern constellation Auriga. It is visible to the naked eye as a faint, white-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 5.05. The star is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of 4.3 km/s.This is an evolved A-type bright giant star with a stellar classification of A5 II+. It is a variable star of unknown type that ranges in magnitude from 5.03 down to 5.09. This star is an estimated 36 million years old with a projected rotational velocity of 8 km/s. It has 8 times the mass of the Sun and about 15 times the Sun's radius. 19 Aurigae is radiating 7,057 times the total luminosity of the Sun from its photosphere at an effective temperature of 8,300 K.

20 Puppis

20 Puppis (20 Pup) is a class G5II (yellow bright giant) star in the constellation Puppis. Its apparent magnitude is 4.99 and it is approximately 870 light years away based on parallax.

21 Sagittarii

21 Sagittarii (21 Sgr) is a class K2II (orange bright giant) star in the constellation Sagittarius. Its apparent magnitude is 4.81 and it is approximately 410 light years away based on parallax.It has one companion, B, at separation 1.7" and magnitude 7.43, with type reported as A5.

24 Scorpii

24 Scorpii (24 Sco) is a class G7.5II (yellow bright giant) star in the constellation Ophiuchus. Its apparent magnitude is 4.91 and it is approximately 412 light years away based on parallax.

43 Sagittarii

43 Sagittarii (43 Sgr) is a class G8II-III (yellow bright giant) star in the constellation Sagittarius. Its apparent magnitude is 4.88 and it is approximately 482 light years away based on parallax.

56 Orionis

56 Orionis is a class K1.5IIb (orange bright giant) star in the constellation Orion. Its apparent magnitude is 4.76 and it is approximately 1260 light years away based on parallax.It has one reported companion, B, with magnitude 13.5 and separation 42.9".

63 Cygni

63 Cygni is a single star in the northern constellation of Cygnus, located around 1,030 light years away from Sun. It is visible to the naked eye as an orange-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.56. 63 Cyg is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −26 km/s.This is an evolved star showing a stellar spectrum with mixed traits between a bright giant and supergiant. It has been chosen as a spectral standard for the class of K4 Ib–IIa.For reasons that are not yet clear, 63 Cygni is displaying very long period (982 days) and low-amplitude (742 m/s) variations in radial velocity. The star has expanded to 35 times the Sun's radius and is radiating 4,397 times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of 4,204 K.

Epsilon Scuti

Epsilon Scuti, Latinized from ε Scuti, is a probable astrometric binary

star system in the constellation Scutum. It is faintly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +4.88. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 6.06 mas as seen from Earth, it is located approximately 540 light years from the Sun. It is moving closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −9.8 km/s.

Epsilon Scuti was a latter designation of 3 Aquilae.The visible component is a yellow-hued bright giant with a G-type bright giant It is radiating 403 times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of 4,500 K. Epsilon Scuti has at least three faint visual companions, two 14th magnitude stars, B and D, separated from the primary by 13.6 and 15.4 arcseconds respectively, and the 13th magnitude C, which is 38 arcseconds away.

HD 110073

HD 110073 (Bayer designation l Cen / l Centauri) is a star in the constellation Centaurus. It is a blue-white B-type bright giant with an apparent magnitude of +4.63 and is approximately 365 light years from Earth.

This is a single-lined spectroscopic binary star system that belongs to the Pleiades group.

HD 116243

HD 116243, also known by the Bayer designation m Centauri (m Cen), is a star in the constellation Centaurus.

m Centauri is a yellow G-type bright giant with an apparent magnitude of +4.52. It is approximately 260 light years from Earth.

HD 167818

HD 167818 is a class K3II (orange bright giant) star in the constellation Sagittarius. Its apparent magnitude is 4.66 and it is approximately 760 light years away based on parallax.

HD 203857

HD 203857 is a late type K giant star in the constellation Cygnus, located nearly 920 light years away from the Sun. The star is thought to form a visual binary system with the F-type bright giant BDS 10966 A, though it's likely they are actually not gravitationally bound. The star likely hosts an extrasolar planet, though yet unconfirmed.

HD 20468

HD 20468 is a class K2II (orange bright giant) star in the constellation Perseus. Its apparent magnitude is 4.82 and it is approximately 1180 light years away based on parallax.

HD 33203

HD 33203 is double star in the northern constellation of Auriga. It includes a bright giant star with a stellar classification of B2II. The two components have an angular separation of 1.617″ along a position angle of 222.1°.

HD 57197

M Puppis (M Pup, HR 2789, HD 57197) is a blue giant or bright giant star (spectral type B8II/III) in the constellation Puppis. Its apparent magnitude is 5.84, which means it is visible with the naked eye under optimal conditions. It is approximately 590 light years away based on parallax.

HD 64440

HD 64440, also known as a Puppis, is a spectroscopic binary star in the constellation Puppis. Its apparent magnitude is 3.71. Located around 108 parsecs (350 ly) distant, the primary is a bright giant of spectral type K1.5II and the secondary is an early A-type star. They orbit with a period just under 7 years and eccentricity 0.38.

HD 76728

HD 76728, also called c Carinae (c Car), is a star in the constellation Carina. It is a blue-white B-type bright giant with an apparent magnitude of +3.84 and is approximately 312 light years from Earth. This star has five times the radius of the Sun.

HR 2554

HR 2554, also known as V415 Carinae and A Carinae, is an eclipsing spectroscopic binary of the Algol type in the constellation of Carina whose apparent visual magnitude varies by 0.06 magnitudes and is approximately 4.39 at maximum brightness. Its primary is a G-type bright giant star and its secondary is an A-type main sequence star. It is approximately 553 light years from Earth.

X Sagittarii

X Sagittarii is a bright giant Cepheid variable star in the constellation Sagittarius.

This variable star changes in apparent magnitude from 4.90 to 4.20 magnitude with a period of 7.01 days. Its change in brightness is accompanied by a change in spectral classification, from G2 to F5. It is approximately 990 light years away based on parallax.

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