Brig Owens

Brigman P. Owens (born February 16, 1943) is a former American football safety in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Washington Redskins. He played college football at the University of Cincinnati.

Brig Owens
No. 23
Position:Safety
Personal information
Born:February 16, 1943 (age 76)
Linden, Texas
Career information
High school:Fullerton Union
(Fullerton, California)
College:Cincinnati
NFL Draft:1965 / Round: 7 / Pick: 89
(by the Dallas Cowboys)
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:158
Interceptions:36
Touchdowns:8
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Owens attended Fullerton Union High School, where he played as a quarterback. After graduation he moved on to Fullerton Junior College, where he was named the starting quarterback and led the team to its first ever bowl game, the 1961 Orange Bowl Show. In his second season, he received junior college All-American honors.[1]

In 1963, he transferred to the University of Cincinnati, where he was named the starting quarterback. He posted 974 passing yards, 7 passing touchdowns, 556 rushing yards (led the team) and 6 rushing touchdowns (led the team), while ranking twelfth in the nation in total offense. He also served as a placekicker and punter.

In his last year, he led the team to a 10-1 record, which were the most wins in school history. He posted 790 passing yards, 6 passing touchdowns, 658 rushing yards and 6 rushing touchdowns. He was a passer, runner, and punter, finishing his college career with a 16-5 record, 2 Missouri Valley Conference titles, 1,764 passing yards, 13 passing touchdowns, 1,214 rushing yards and 12 rushing touchdowns.[2]

In 1979, he was inducted into the University of Cincinnati Athletics Hall of Fame. In 1982, he was inducted into the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame. In 2005, he was inducted into the Fullerton College Athletics Hall of Fame.[3]

Professional career

Dallas Cowboys

Owens was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the seventh round (89th overall) of the 1965 NFL draft, who converted him into a safety. He spent most of the year on the team's taxi squad. On August 30, 1966, he was traded along with Jake Kupp and Mitch Johnson, to the Washington Redskins in exchange for Jim Steffen and a fifth round draft choice (#119-Willie Parker).[4]

Washington Redskins

In 1970, he was named the starter at strong safety.[5] He remained with the Redskins until he retired after the 1977 season. He played a significant role in leading the 1972 squad to Super Bowl VII and had a good performance in the game, recording a key interception from Miami Dolphins quarterback Bob Griese in the end zone during the second half.

One of his more memorable performances occurred on a 1966 regular season game against the New York Giants, where he scored two defensive touchdowns: a 62-yard interception return and a 62-yard fumble return. Washington ended up winning the game 72–41. To this day it is the highest scoring game in NFL history.

Owens holds the record for most interception return yards in Redskins history (686) and is second all-time for the Redskins in career interceptions (36). Three of his interceptions were returned for touchdowns. He also recovered ten fumbles, returning them for 143 yards and two touchdowns.

He was inducted into the Redskins' Ring of Fame.

Personal life

After the NFL, Owens finished law school and went to work with the National Football League Players Association, serving as the assistant executive director. He also owned his own business, a commercial real estate development company which also represented professional athletes.[6]

Owens is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity.[7] Married to Patricia since 1965, the couple has two daughters, Robin and Tracy.

References

  1. ^ "Brig Owens Fullerton College Hall of Fame bio" (PDF). Retrieved September 10, 2017.
  2. ^ "Brig Owens Cincinnati Hall of Fame bio". Retrieved September 10, 2017.
  3. ^ "Hornet Tradition". Retrieved September 10, 2017.
  4. ^ "Steffen Traded, Joe Bellino Cut". Retrieved April 30, 2017.
  5. ^ "Washington's Brig Owens Now Happy With Defense". Retrieved September 10, 2017.
  6. ^ "60 Heroes: Brig Owens Continues to Push Union Forward". Retrieved September 10, 2017.
  7. ^ "Archived Document". Archived from the original on 2006-09-05. Retrieved 2006-10-24.

External links

1964 Cincinnati Bearcats football team

The 1964 Cincinnati Bearcats football team represented the University of Cincinnati in the Missouri Valley Conference (MVC) during the 1964 college football season. In their fourth season under head coach Chuck Studley, the Bearcats compiled an 8–2 record (3–0 against conference opponents), won the MVC championship, and outscored opponents by a total of 211 to 99.The team's statistical leaders included team captain Brig Owens with 790 passing yards, Al Nelson with 973 rushing yards and 78 points scored, and Errol Prisby with 367 receiving yards. Nelson broke the Cincinnati single-season rushing record of 959 yards set by Roger Stephens in 1947.

1966 Washington Redskins season

The 1966 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 35th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 30th in Washington, D.C..The Washington Redskins attempted to make Vince Lombardi their new head coach, but Lombardi refused their offer and the Redskins had to settle for Otto Graham. They finished with a 7–7 record, fifth place in the eight-team Eastern Conference.

In Week Twelve, the Redskins set an NFL record for most points by one team in a regular season game, scoring 72 points against the Giants. (Incidentally, this was one point less than the all-time record, the 73 scored by Chicago in the 1940 NFL Championship Game, in which the Redskins surrendered 11 touchdowns and were shut out.)

1968 Washington Redskins season

The 1968 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 32nd in Washington, D.C.. The team finished 5-9, failing to improve on their 5-6-3 record from 1967.

1969 Washington Redskins season

The 1969 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 38th season in the National Football League. The team improved on their 5–9 record from 1968, by hiring legendary Green Bay Packers head coach Vince Lombardi. Sam Huff (a future member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame) came out of retirement specifically to play for Lombardi and finished with a record of 7–5–2.

1970 Washington Redskins season

The 1970 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 39th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 34th in Washington, D.C.. Second-year head coach Vince Lombardi was diagnosed with terminal cancer in late June and died on September 3; offensive line coach Bill Austin stepped in as interim head coach in mid-July.Austin had been an NFL head coach for three seasons with the Pittsburgh Steelers (1966–68) and was starting his eighth year as an assistant coach under Lombardi (1959–64, 1969–70). Also, Austin's final four seasons as a player on the offensive line with the New York Giants (1954–57) were with Lombardi as offensive coordinator.

The Redskins finished at 6–8 in 1970, fourth in the NFC East, but with a five-game losing streak in the second half of the season. The last loss was a 34–0 shutout at rival Dallas on December 6, and Washington fell to a 4–8 record and four games behind the Cowboys.It was the 25th consecutive season that the Redskins did not advance to the playoffs. Austin's contract was not renewed, and he was succeeded by George Allen in January 1971. Austin returned to Redskins in 1973 as the offensive line coach under Allen for five seasons.

1971 Washington Redskins season

The 1971 Washington Redskins was the team's 40th in the National Football League, and their 35th in Washington, D.C.. The 1971 was the first with the Redskins for coach George Allen, who had been the head coach of the Los Angeles Rams for the previous five seasons.

Coming into the 1971 season, the team had not made it to the post-season for 26 seasons. The Redskins had had only four winning seasons since their last playoff berth in 1945, the most recent a 7-5-2 campaign in 1969 under Vince Lombardi, who died of colon cancer in September 1970.Allen was Washington's fourth coach in as many seasons. Lombardi succeeded Otto Graham, and Bill Austin took over when Lombardi fell mortally ill.

Despite a broken left ankle suffered by leading receiver Charley Taylor in their week six loss to the Kansas City Chiefs which forced him to miss the remainder of the season, the Redskins went 9–4–1, good for second place in the NFC East, and a wild card berth, where they would ultimately fall to San Francisco, 24–20.

1972 Washington Redskins season

The 1972 Washington Redskins season was the team's 41st season, and 36th in Washington, D.C. The Redskins were trying to build on the success of the previous season, in which they had made the postseason for the first time in 26 seasons.

Head coach George Allen, in just his second season with the team, took the Redskins to their first Super Bowl. The team, who had missed the postseason in the entirety of the 1950s and 1960s, won their first postseason game since 1943, and appeared in their first league championship game since 1945.

The NFC Champion Redskins would ultimately lose a very close Super Bowl VII, 14–7, to the undefeated Miami Dolphins.

The 1972 season was the first in which the team wore their current logo, which features a Native American head in profile within a gold circle. It remains the team's primary logo.

1973 Washington Redskins season

The 1973 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 42nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 37th in Washington, D.C..The team failed to improve on their 11–3 record from 1972, and finished 10-4

1974 Washington Redskins season

The 1974 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 38th in Washington, D.C.. the team matched on their 10–4 record from 1973. It's also notable for being Deacon Jones' first and only season with the Redskins; as well as being his final year in the NFL.

1975 Washington Redskins season

The 1975 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 44th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 39th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 10–4 record from 1974 and finsished 8-6.

1976 Washington Redskins season

The 1976 Washington Redskins season was the franchise’s 45th overall and 40th in Washington, D.C. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 8–6 record from 1975, which they did, finishing 10-4, second in the NFC East behind the Dallas Cowboys. They would be eliminated from the NFL playoffs by the Minnesota Vikings. This was the first season as a Redskin for Hall of Fame running back John Riggins, signed as a free agent after spending the first five seasons of his career with the New York Jets. This was also the last season in which the Redskins would make the playoffs under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen.

1977 Washington Redskins season

The 1977 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 46th season overall, and would be the last under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 10–4 record from 1976, but they would finish 9-5 and fail to qualify for postseason play.

Fullerton Union High School

Fullerton Union High School is a public high school located in the Orange County, California city of Fullerton, United States operated by the Fullerton Joint Union High School District.

Jake Kupp

Jacob Ralph Kupp (born March 12, 1941) is a former American football guard in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, Atlanta Falcons and New Orleans Saints. He played college football at the University of Washington.

Jim Steffen

James William Steffen (May 1, 1936 - April 23, 2015) was an American football defensive back who played in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions and the Washington Redskins. He played college football at the University of California, Los Angeles and was drafted in the thirteenth round of the 1959 NFL Draft. James Steffen attended Tustin High School and graduated in 1954.

Linden, Texas

Linden is a city in Cass County, Texas, United States. The population was 1,988 at the 2010 census, down from 2,256 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Cass County.

List of Cincinnati Bearcats in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Cincinnati Bearcats football players in the NFL Draft.

Mitch Johnson

Mitchell Allen Johnson (born March 1, 1942) is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, Los Angeles Rams and Cleveland Browns. He played college football at UCLA.

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