Brian Lumley

Brian Lumley (born 2 December 1937) is an English author of horror fiction. He came to prominence in the 1970s writing in the Cthulhu Mythos created by American writer H.P. Lovecraft but featuring the new character Titus Crow, and went on to greater fame in the 1980s with the best-selling Necroscope series, initially centered on character Harry Keogh who can communicate with the spirits of the dead.

Brian Lumley
Brian Lumley
Born2 December 1937 (age 81)
County Durham, England
Occupationnovelist, Writer
Period1971–present
GenreHorror, science fiction
Website
brianlumley.com

Biography

Born in County Durham, he joined the British Army's Royal Military Police and wrote stories in his spare time before retiring with the rank of Warrant Officer Class 1 in 1980[1] and becoming a professional writer.

In the 1970s he added to H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos cycle of stories, including several tales and a novel featuring the character Titus Crow. Several of his early books were published by Arkham House. Other stories pastiched Lovecraft's Dream Cycle but featured Lumley's original characters David Hero and Eldin the Wanderer. Lumley once explained the difference between his Cthulhu Mythos characters and Lovecraft's: "My guys fight back. Also, they like to have a laugh along the way."[2]

Later works included the Necroscope series of novels, which produced spin-off series such as the Vampire World Trilogy, The Lost Years parts 1 and 2, and the E-Branch trilogy. The central protagonist of the earlier Necroscope novels appears in the anthology Harry Keogh and Other Weird Heroes. The latest entry in the Necroscope saga is The Mobius Murders.[1]

Lumley served as president of the Horror Writers Association from 1996 to 1997. On 28 March 2010 Lumley was awarded Lifetime Achievement Award of the Horror Writers Association.[3] He also received a World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2010.[4]

Inspiration

Lumley's list of his favourite horror stories—"not complete by any means and by no means in order of preference"—includes M. R. James' "Count Magnus", Robert E. Howard's "The Black Stone", Robert W. Chambers' "The Yellow Sign" from The King in Yellow, William Hope Hodgson's "The Voice in the Night", and H. P. Lovecraft's "The Haunter of the Dark" and "The Colour Out of Space".[5]

Bibliography

This is a list of Lumley's more notable novels and short story collections. This list of novels and short stories is not exhaustive. Lumley has had many pieces published in periodicals and other publications, sometimes as works in progress or partial works, under his own name and jointly with other writers.

Title Series Year Pages Type Notes
Necroscope Necroscope Saga 1986 512 novel
Necroscope II: Wamphyri! Necroscope Saga 1988 496 novel US Title: Necroscope II: Vamphyri!
Necroscope III: The Source Necroscope Saga 1989 528 novel
Necroscope IV: Deadspeak Necroscope Saga 1990 560 novel
Necroscope V: Deadspawn Necroscope Saga 1991 592 novel
Vampire World 1: Blood Brothers Necroscope Saga 1992 752 novel US Title Blood Brothers
Vampire World 2: The Last Aerie Necroscope Saga 1993 768 novel US Title The Last Aerie
Vampire World 3: Bloodwars Necroscope Saga 1994 784 novel US Title Bloodwars
Necroscope: The Lost Years Volume 1 Necroscope Saga 1995 483 novel US Title Necroscope: The Lost Years
Necroscope: The Lost Years Volume 2 Necroscope Saga 1996 468 novel US Title Necroscope: Resurgence, The Lost Years Volume Two
E-Branch 1: Invaders Necroscope Saga 1998 560 novel US Title Necroscope: Invaders
Necroscope: Defilers, E-Branch Volume 2 Necroscope Saga 1999 672 novel
Necroscope: Avengers, E-Branch Volume 3 Necroscope Saga 2000 576 novel
Harry Keogh: Necroscope and Other Weird Heroes! Necroscope Saga 2003 320 collection
Necroscope: The Touch Necroscope Saga 2006 672 novel
Necroscope: Harry and the Pirates Necroscope Saga 2009 416 collection UK Title Necroscope: The Lost Years Harry and the Pirates
Necroscope: The Plague-Bearer Necroscope Saga 2010 184 novella
Necroscope: The Möbius Murders Necroscope Saga 2013 176 novella
Psychomech Psychomech Trilogy 1984 351 novel
Psychosphere Psychomech Trilogy 1984 272 novel
Psychamok Psychomech Trilogy 1985 445 novel
The Burrowers Beneath Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1974 novel Part of the Titus Crow series
The Transition of Titus Crow Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1975 novel Part of the Titus Crow series
The Clock of Dreams Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1978 novel Part of the Titus Crow series
Spawn of the Winds Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1978 novel Part of the Titus Crow series
In the Moons of Borea Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1979 novel Part of the Titus Crow series
Elysia Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1989 novel Book ties together & concludes Titus Crow, Dreamlands and Primal Land series
Hero of Dreams Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1986 novel Part of the Dreamlands series
Ship of Dreams Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1986 novel Part of the Dreamlands series
Mad Moon of Dreams Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1987 novel Part of the Dreamlands series
Iced on Aran Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1992 collection Part of the Dreamlands series
House of Cthulhu Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1991 collection Part of the Primal Land series
Tarra Khash: Hrossak! Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1991 novel Part of the Primal Land series
Sorcery in Shad Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1991 novel Part of the Primal Land series
Beneath the Moors Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1974 novella
Khai of Ancient Khem 1980 novel Khai of Khem in recent editions
Demogorgon 1987 345 novel
The House of Doors 1990 novel
The House of Doors: The Second Visit 1998 novel US title: Maze of Worlds
The Fly-By-Nights 2011 novel
The Caller of the Black 1971 collection
The Horror at Oakdeene and Others 1977 collection
The House of Cthulhu and Others 1984 collection
Fruiting Bodies and Other Fungi 1993 collection
Dagon's Bell and Other Discords 1994 collection
Return of the Deep Ones and Other Mythos Tales Cthulhu Cycle Deities 1994 collection
The Second Wish and Other Exhalations 1995 collection
A Coven of Vampires 1998 collection
The Whisperer and Other Voices 2001 collection
Brian Lumley's Freaks 2004 collection
Screaming Science Fiction: Horrors from Out of Space 2006 collection
The Taint and other Novellas: Best Mythos Tales Number 1 Cthulhu Cycle Deities 2008 collection
Haggopian and Other Tales: Best Mythos Tales Number 1 Cthulhu Cycle Deities 2008 collection
The Nonesuch and Others 2009 collection
The Subterranean Press edition
  • Necroscope (novel)
  • Brian Lumley's Freaks
    • Introduction
    • In the Glow Zone
    • Mother Love
    • Problem Child
    • The Ugly Act
    • Somebody Calling
  • A Coven of Vampires (1998)
    • What Dark God?
    • Back Row
    • The Strange Years
    • The Kiss of the Lamia
    • Recognition
    • The Thief Immortal
    • Necros
    • The Thing from the Blasted Heath
    • Uzzi
    • Haggopian
    • The Picknickers
    • Zack Phalanx is Vlad the Impaler
    • The House of the Temple
  • Screaming Science Fiction: Horrors from Out of Space
    • "Snarker's Son"
    • "The Man Who Felt Pain"
    • "The Strange Years"
    • "No Way Home"
    • "The Man Who Saw No Spiders"
    • "Deja Viewer"
    • "Feasibility Study"
    • "Gaddy's Gloves"
    • "The Big 'C'"
  • The Taint and other novellas: Best Mythos Tales, Volume One (2007)
    • "Introduction"
    • The Horror at Oakdeene
    • Born of the Winds
    • The Fairground Horror
    • The Taint
    • Rising with Surtsey
    • Lord of the Worms
    • The House of the Temple
  • Haggopian and other stories (2008)
    • Introduction
    • The Caller of the Black
    • Haggopian
    • Cement Surroundings
    • The House of Cthulhu
    • The Night Sea-Maid Went Down
    • Name and Number
    • Recognition
    • Curse of the Golden Guardians
    • Aunt Hester
    • The Kiss of Bugg-Shash
    • De Marigny's Clock
    • Mylakhrion the Immortal
    • The Sister City
    • What Dark God?
    • The Statement of Henry Worthy
    • Dagon's Bell
    • The Thing from the Blasted Heath
    • Dylath Leen
    • The Mirror of Nitocris
    • The Second Wish
    • The Hymn
    • Synchronicity or Something
    • The Black Recalled
    • The Sorcerer's Dream
  • The Nonesuch and Others (2009)
    • Introduction
    • "The Thin People"
    • "Stilts"
    • The Nonesuch
  • The Fly-by-Nights (2011)

References

  1. ^ "Brian Lumley's website". Brianlumley.com. 2 December 1937. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  2. ^ Brian Lumley, "Mail-Call of Cthulhu", Black Forbidden Things, p. 194.
  3. ^ Scott, Sifu (29 March 2010). "Horror Writers Association Presents 2009 Stoker Winners". Dreadcentral.com. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  4. ^ World Fantasy Convention (2010). "2010 World Fantasy Award Winners & Nominees". Archived from the original on 27 October 2012. Retrieved 4 February 2011.
  5. ^ "An Interview with Brian Lumley", Robert M. Price, Nightscapes No. 5.

http://www.brianlumley.net

Further reading

  • Leigh Blackmore. Brian Lumley: A New Bibliography. Sydney: Dark Press, 1994. San Bernardino, CA: Borgo Press, 1987.
  • Brian Lumley and Stanley Wiater (eds). The Brian Lumley Companion. NY: Books, 2002.

External links

A Coven of Vampires

A Coven of Vampires is a collection of horror short stories by author Brian Lumley. The stories all concern vampires. It was released in 1998 by Fedogan & Bremer in an edition of 1,100 copies, of which 100 were numbered and signed by the author, and illustrator. Most of the stories originally appeared in a number of different anthologies and collections or in the magazines Terror Australis, Fantasy Tales, Weirdbook, Fear!, Fantasy and Science Fiction and Kadath.

Beneath the Moors

Beneath the Moors is a fantasy horror novel by author Brian Lumley. It was published by Arkham House in 1974 in an edition of 3,842 copies. It was Lumley's second book published by Arkham House. The novel is part of the Cthulhu Mythos.

Blood Brothers (Lumley novel)

Blood Brothers is the sixth book in the Necroscope series by British writer Brian Lumley, and the first book in the Vampire World Trilogy. It was released in 1992.

Brian Lumley deities

The Brian Lumley deities are supernatural entities created for the Cthulhu Mythos universe of shared fiction by British horror writer Brian Lumley.

Chthonian (Cthulhu Mythos)

Chthonians ( from Greek: chthon, "earth") are worm-like creatures in the Cthulhu Mythos. Chthonian, as a name for the species, is the creation of English horror writer Brian Lumley and was first featured in his short story "Cement Surroundings" (1969)—though the creature never made a direct appearance. The Chthonians had a more prominent role in Lumley's novel The Burrowers Beneath (1974), whose title is taken from one of the stories said to have been written by Robert Blake in Lovecraft's "The Haunter of the Dark."

Kuranes

Kuranes (also King Kuranes) is a fictional character in H. P. Lovecraft's Dream Cycle. He was introduced in the short story "Celephaïs" (1922) and also appeared in The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath (1926).

Kuranes was a great dreamer and made frequent visits to the Dreamlands. In the waking world, he was of landed gentry in Cornwall, but as his fortunes declined he retreated into fantasy and drug use, eventually dying impoverished and homeless. In his dreams, he created the city of Celephaïs, the valley of Ooth-Nargai, in which Celephaïs was situated, and presumably the cloud city of Serannian, which was connected with Celephaïs. After he died he became the king and chief god of Celephaïs. He didn't care for the pomp and grandeur of Dreamland court life, and preferred to live most of the time in a nearby area he created to resemble the house and land in Cornwall where he had lived as a boy.

He is the only dreamer who has gone to the outermost void "where no dreams reach", that is the court of Azathoth, and survived with both life and sanity intact.

Kuranes has also appeared in Lovecraftian pastiches by authors such as Brian Lumley. Lumley's characters David Hero and Eldin the Wanderer eventually become agents for Kuranes.

List of speculative poets

This is a list of speculative poets. People on this list should have articles of their own, and should meet the Wikipedia notability guidelines for their poetry. Please place names on the list only if there is a real and existing article on the poet.

Men of Leng

The Men of Leng are a fictional race in the writings of H. P. Lovecraft.Leng are the primitive, satyr-like inhabitants of the Plateau of Leng in the Dreamlands. They are mentioned throughout Lovecraft's Dream Cycle, especially in the novella The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath (1926).

The Men of Leng appear in The Clock of Dreams and Mad Moon of Dreams, by Brian Lumley.

The ruined city of Sarkomand was their former capital.

The Men of Leng are included in the Pathfinder RPG, where they are known as the Denizens of Leng, a race of creatures who sail across the planes of existence in great black ships, trading strange, flawless rubies and exotic goods from the Realm of Dreams for mortal slaves, to be taken back to Leng for unknown reasons.

Necroscope

Necroscope is the title of a series of horror novels by British author Brian Lumley.The term necroscope, as defined in the series, describes someone who can communicate with the dead (coined Deadspeak later in the series). Unlike necromancers, who here extract the knowledge they seek by brutal eviscerations of corpses, a necroscope can communicate with them as equals: peacefully and without any physical interference.

The abilities of a necroscope are defined as a type of ESP.

Necroscope (novel)

Necroscope is the first book in the Necroscope series by British writer Brian Lumley. It was released in 1986.

The Caller of the Black

The Caller of the Black is a collection of stories by British writer Brian Lumley. It was released in 1971 and was the author's first collection of stories published by Arkham House. It was published in an edition of 3,606 copies. Many of the stories are of the Cthulhu Mythos.

The Horror at Oakdeene and Others

The Horror at Oakdeene and Others is a collection of stories by author Brian Lumley. It was released in 1977 and was the author's third book published by Arkham House. It was published in an edition of 4,162 copies. Many of the stories are of the Cthulhu Mythos.

The Last Aerie

Necroscope is the seventh book in the Necroscope series by British writer Brian Lumley, and the second in the Vampire World Trilogy. It was released in 1993.

Titus Crow

Titus Crow is the main character in the eponymous series of horror fiction books by Brian Lumley. The books are based on H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos.

Weird Tales (anthology series)

Weird Tales was a series of paperback anthologies, a revival of the classic fantasy and horror magazine of the same title, published by Zebra Books from 1980 to 1983 under the editorship of Lin Carter. It was issued more or less annually, though the first two volumes were issued simultaneously and there was a year’s gap between the third and fourth. It was preceded and succeeded by versions of the title in standard magazine form.

Each volume featured thirteen or fourteen novelettes, short stories and poems, including both new works by various fantasy authors and reprints from authors associated with the original Weird Tales, together with an editorial and introductory notes to the individual pieces by the editor. Authors whose works were featured included Robert Aickman, James Anderson, Robert H. Barlow, Robert Bloch, Hannes Bok, Ray Bradbury, Joseph Payne Brennan, Diane and John Brizzolara, Ramsey Campbell, Mary Elizabeth Counselman, August Derleth, Nictzin Dyalhis, Lloyd Arthur Eshbach, Robert E. Howard, Carl Jacobi, David H. Keller, Marc Laidlaw, Tanith Lee, Frank Belknap Long, Jr., H. P. Lovecraft, Robert A. W. Lowndes, Brian Lumley, Gary Myers, R. Faraday Nelson, Frank Owen, Gerald W. Page, Seabury Quinn, Anthony M. Rud, Charles Sheffield, Clark Ashton Smith, Stuart H. Stock, Steve Rasnic Tem, Evangeline Walton, Donald Wandrei, and Manly Wade Wellman, as well as Carter himself.

Carter habitually padded out the volumes he edited with a few his own works, whether written singly or in collaboration (the latter generally "posthumous collaborations" with Clark Ashton Smith in which he wrote stories on the basis of unused titles or story ideas from Smith’s notebooks).

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