Brian Gutekunst

Brian Willis Gutekunst is an American football executive who is currently the general manager for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL).[1]

Brian Gutekunst
Green Bay Packers
Position:General manager
Personal information
Born:July 19, 1973 (age 45)
Raleigh, North Carolina
Career information
College:Wisconsin-La Crosse
Career history
As executive:
As administrator:

Biography

Gutekunst was born on July 19, 1973, in Raleigh, North Carolina.[2] His father, John Gutekunst, was the head coach of the Minnesota Golden Gophers football team. Gutekunst attended the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. During his time there, he played on the football team before suffering a career-ending shoulder injury. Afterwards, he served as an assistant coach with the team, including during their 1995 National Championship season. He is married to Jen Gutekunst. They have had four children together.

Scouting career

Gutekunst spent most of the 1998 NFL season with the Kansas City Chiefs as a scouting assistant. He then joined the Packers as a college scout for the East Coast of the United States. Gutekunst assumed his position in 2012. He was promoted to director of player personnel on March 21, 2016. On January 7, 2018 the Green Bay Packers promoted Gutekunst to become their new general manager to replace Ted Thompson.

References

  1. ^ Wesseling, Chris. "Packers hiring Brian Gutekunst as general manager". NFL.com. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  2. ^ "Brian Gutekunst". Green Bay Packers. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
2018 Green Bay Packers season

The 2018 season was the Green Bay Packers' 98th season in the National Football League, their 100th overall and their 13th and final season under head coach Mike McCarthy. After missing the playoffs for the first time since 2008 and losing quarterback Aaron Rodgers to injury, the Packers were aiming to improve their 7–9 record from last season but finished with a 6–9–1 record.

For the first time since 2007, Jordy Nelson did not play for the Packers as he signed with the Oakland Raiders via free agency during the offseason.

On January 7, 2018, Brian Gutekunst was named the new general manager, after Ted Thompson took over as the senior advisor to football operations.On December 2, 2018, after a 4–7–1 start, Mike McCarthy was fired hours after the Packer's Week 13 loss to the Arizona Cardinals and Joe Philbin was named as the interim head coach. After a loss to the Chicago Bears in week 15, the Packers were eliminated from the postseason. This was the first time the Packers missed the postseason back to back years since 2005 to 2006, which were also the first two seasons of the Aaron Rodgers era and the beginning of the Rodgers/McCarthy era. This was also the first time the Packers suffered from back to back losing seasons since 1990 to 1991.

2018 NFL season

The 2018 NFL season was the 99th season of the National Football League (NFL). The season began on September 6, 2018, with the NFL Kickoff Game with the defending Super Bowl LII champion Philadelphia Eagles defeating the Atlanta Falcons 18–12. The season concluded with Super Bowl LIII, the league's championship game, on February 3, 2019, at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia between NFC Champions Los Angeles Rams and AFC Champions New England Patriots. The Patriots defeated the Rams 13–3 for their sixth Super Bowl championship and their third in their last five seasons.

2019 Green Bay Packers season

The 2019 season will be the Green Bay Packers' upcoming 99th season in the National Football League, their 101st overall and their first under new head coach Matt LaFleur. After suffering back-to-back losing seasons in for the first time since 1990–91 and missing the playoffs back-to-back seasons for the first time since 2005–06, the Packers will look to improve on their 6–9–1 record from last year, and attempt to return to the playoffs for the first time since 2016.

Bart Starr

Bryan Bartlett "Bart" Starr (born January 9, 1934) is a former professional American football player and coach. He played quarterback for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 1956 through 1971. Starr is the only quarterback in NFL history to lead a team to three consecutive league championships (1965–1967). Starr trails only New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady for total NFL championships, with five. Starr led his team to victories in the first two Super Bowls: I and II. As the Packers' head coach, he was less successful, compiling a 52–76–3 (.408) record from 1975 through 1983.

Starr was named the Most Valuable Player of the first two Super Bowls and during his career earned four Pro Bowl selections. He won the league MVP award in 1966. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the Packers Hall of Fame in 1977.

Starr has the highest postseason passer rating (104.8) of any quarterback in NFL history and a postseason record of 9–1. His career completion percentage of 57.4 was an NFL best when he retired in 1972. Starr also held the Packers' franchise record for games played (196) for 32 years, through the 2003 season.Starr played college football at the University of Alabama and was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the 17th round of the 1956 NFL draft (200th overall).

Cole Madison

Cole Madison (born December 20, 1994) is an American football guard for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Washington State, and was drafted by the Packers in the fifth round of the 2018 NFL Draft.

Curly Lambeau

Earl Louis "Curly" Lambeau (April 9, 1898 – June 1, 1965) was a professional American football player and coach in the National Football League (NFL). Lambeau, along with his friend and fellow Green Bay, Wisconsin native George Whitney Calhoun, founded the Green Bay Packers in 1919. From 1919 to 1929, Lambeau served as a player-coach and maintained de facto control on the day-to-day operations of the team. As a player, Lambeau lined up as a halfback, which in the early years of the NFL was the premier position. He was the team's primary runner and passer, accounting for 35 touchdowns (eight as a rusher, three as a receiver, and 24 as a passer) in 77 games. He won his only NFL championship as a player in 1929.

From 1919 to 1949, Lambeau was the head coach and general manager of the Packers. He led his team to over 200 wins and six NFL championships, including three straight from 1929 to 1931. He shares the distinction with rival George Halas of the Chicago Bears and later, Bill Belichick of the New England Patriots of coaching his team to the most NFL championships. Lambeau also coached eight players who went on to be elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. With players such as quarterback Arnie Herber and split end Don Hutson, his teams revolutionized the use of the passing game in football. After a falling out with the Packers Board of Directors, Lambeau left the Packers to coach the Chicago Cardinals for two seasons and then Washington Redskins for two more. He retired from the NFL in 1953.

For his accomplishments, Lambeau has been widely recognized and honored. He was named to the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team as one of the top halfbacks in the league's first decade of existence. He was an inaugural inductee to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963 and the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1970 in recognition for his role as founder, player, and coach of the Packers. Shortly after his death in 1965, the Packers home stadium, which is still in use today, was renamed to Lambeau Field in his honor.

Dan Devine

Daniel John Devine (December 22, 1924 – May 9, 2002) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Arizona State University from 1955 to 1957, the University of Missouri from 1958 to 1970, and the University of Notre Dame from 1975 to 1980, compiling a career college football mark of 173–56–9. Devine was also the head coach of the National Football League's Green Bay Packers from 1971 to 1974, tallying a mark of 25–27–4. His 1977 Notre Dame team won a national championship after beating Texas in the Cotton Bowl. Devine was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1985.

Eliot Wolf

Eliot Wolf is the assistant general manager of the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL).

Gene Ronzani

Eugene A. "Gene" Ronzani (March 28, 1909 – September 12, 1975) was a professional football player and coach in the National Football League. He was the second head coach of the Green Bay Packers, from 1950 to 1953, and resigned with two games remaining in the 1953 season.

A three-sport athlete at Marquette University, Ronzani earned nine varsity letters in college and was a backfield player in the NFL with the Chicago Bears for six seasons in the 1930s and two more in the mid-1940s.

Green Bay Packers

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The Packers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. It is the third-oldest franchise in the NFL, dating back to 1919, and is the only non-profit, community-owned major league professional sports team based in the United States. Home games have been played at Lambeau Field since 1957.

The Packers are the last of the "small town teams" which were common in the NFL during the league's early days of the 1920s and '30s. Founded in 1919 by Earl "Curly" Lambeau and George Whitney Calhoun, the franchise traces its lineage to other semi-professional teams in Green Bay dating back to 1896. Between 1919 and 1920, the Packers competed against other semi-pro clubs from around Wisconsin and the Midwest, before joining the American Professional Football Association (APFA), the forerunner of today's NFL, in 1921. Although Green Bay is by far the smallest major league professional sports market in North America, Forbes ranked the Packers as the world's 26th most valuable sports franchise in 2016, with a value of $2.35 billion.The Packers have won 13 league championships, the most in NFL history, with nine pre–Super Bowl NFL titles and four Super Bowl victories. The Packers won the first two Super Bowls in 1967 and 1968 and were the only NFL team to defeat the American Football League (AFL) prior to the AFL–NFL merger. The Vince Lombardi Trophy is named after the Packers' coach of the same name, who guided them to their first two Super Bowls. Their two subsequent Super Bowl wins came in 1996 and 2010.The Packers are long-standing adversaries of the Chicago Bears, Minnesota Vikings, and Detroit Lions, who today comprise the NFL's NFC North division, and were formerly members of the NFC Central Division. They have played over 100 games against each of those teams through history, and have a winning overall record against all of them, a distinction only shared with the Kansas City Chiefs and Dallas Cowboys. The Bears–Packers rivalry is one of the oldest in NFL history, dating back to 1921.

John Gutekunst

John Gutekunst (born April 13, 1944) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the inside linebackers coach for North Carolina A&T State University. He served as the head football coach at the University of Minnesota from 1985 to 1991, compiling a record of 29–37–2. Gutekunst came to Minnesota in 1984 as an assistant coach and took over as interim head coach in 1985 for the Independence Bowl after Lou Holtz left the team to become the head coach at Notre Dame. Gutekunst was promoted to head coach before the next season. He has also served as an assistant coach at Duke University, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Wake Forest University, Rutgers University, the University of Rhode Island, the University of South Carolina, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and East Carolina University. He joined the East Carolina staff in October 2009, taking over for Rock Roggeman, who left on indefinite medical leave. Gutekunst is an alumnus of Duke University, where he played football and baseball.

His son, Brian Gutekunst, is general manager of the Green Bay Packers.

John Kuhn

John Allen Kuhn (born September 9, 1982) is a former American football fullback. After playing college football for Shippensburg University, he was signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers as an undrafted free agent in 2005. Kuhn earned a Super Bowl ring as a member of the Steelers in Super Bowl XL. He earned a second ring with the Green Bay Packers, against his former team, five years later in Super Bowl XLV. He was named to three Pro Bowls, all as a Packer.

List of people from Raleigh, North Carolina

This is a list of people from Raleigh, North Carolina.

Mike Sherman

Michael Francis Sherman (born December 19, 1954) is an American gridiron football coach and former player who is currently the head coach of the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League (CFL). He was the head coach of the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 2000 to 2005. Sherman led the Packers to five consecutive winning seasons from 2000–04 and three divisional titles in 2002, 2003, and 2004. He was also the head football coach at Texas A&M University from 2008 to 2011. He has also been a coach in the NFL for the Seattle Seahawks, Houston Texans and Miami Dolphins. Before he started coaching in the NFL, he served as an assistant coach at five different colleges, including Texas A&M, where he coached the offensive line for seven seasons. He is one of only a few coaches that has been a head coach at the high school, college, CFL and NFL level.

Phil Bengtson

John Phillip Bengtson (July 17, 1913 – December 18, 1994) was an American football player and coach. He was a longtime assistant coach in college football and the National Football League (NFL), chiefly remembered as the successor to Vince Lombardi as head coach of the Green Bay Packers in 1968.

Ron Wolf

Ron Wolf (born December 30, 1938) is the former American football general manager (GM) of the National Football League's Green Bay Packers. Wolf is widely credited with bringing success to a Packers franchise that had rarely won during the two decades prior to Wolf joining the organization. He also played a significant role in personnel operations with the Oakland and Los Angeles Raiders from 1963 to 1975 and again from 1978 to 1990. He joined Green Bay's front office in November 1991 from a personnel director's job with the New York Jets. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in August 2015.

Ted Thompson

Ted Thompson (born January 17, 1953) is an American football executive for the Green Bay Packers and former player. He was the general manager of the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 2005 to 2017. He was named to the post on January 14, 2005, by former Packers president and CEO Bob Harlan. Thompson took over the general manager duties from Mike Sherman, who had been serving as both head coach and general manager. Prior to becoming the Packers' general manager, Thompson served with the Seattle Seahawks as their vice president of operations from 2000 to 2004. Thompson had previously worked for the Packers organization from 1992 to 1999, serving as their assistant director of pro personnel in 1992, their director of pro personnel from 1993 to 1997, and their director of player personnel from 1997 to 1999. Thompson also had a 10-year playing career in the NFL as a linebacker and special teams player with the Houston Oilers from 1975 to 1984.

Tom Braatz

Thomas Myron Braatz (May 12, 1933 - October 30, 2018) was a former American football linebacker in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins, Los Angeles Rams, and Dallas Cowboys. He also is a former general manager of the Atlanta Falcons and Green Bay Packers. He played college football at Marquette University.

Verne Lewellen

Verne Clark Lewellen (September 29, 1901 – April 16, 1980) was an American football player and executive.

A four-sport high school athlete, Lewellen stayed in Lincoln to attend Nebraska University, where he captained and quarterbacked the Cornhuskers to a 14-7 defeat of a Notre Dame squad in 1923. Also a pitcher, the Pittsburgh Pirates were ready to sign him until an injury from a train wreck affected his pitching arm. Jim Crowley - who played against Lewellen in the 1923 Nebraska-Notre Dame matchup - recommended Lewellen to Packer coach Curly Lambeau.He played most of his nine-year career with the Green Bay Packers. Lewellen played in 102 games for the Packers from 1924 to 1932 (in 1927, the team "lent" him to the New York Yankees for three end-of-season games) and earned all-league first team honors from 1926-29. Completing a law degree from Nebraska University during his professional football career, he ran successfully for Brown County (WI) District Attorney in 1928 against Packer teammate LaVern Dilweg and was re-elected in 1930. He lost the seat in the 1932 election and practiced law until his retirement.In 1950, he joined the Packers as a member of the executive committee, served as the Packers' general manager from 1954 through 1958 and business manager from 1961 to 1967.He was elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1967 and the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1970.

The Professional Football Researchers Association named Lewellen to the PRFA Hall of Very Good Class of 2009

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