Brian Gottfried

Brian Edward Gottfried (born January 27, 1952) is a retired American tennis player who won 25 singles titles and 54 doubles titles during his professional career. The right-hander was the runner-up at the 1977 French Open and achieved a career-high singles ranking on the ATP tour on June 19, 1977, when he became World No. 3.

Brian Gottfried
Country (sports) United States
ResidencePonte Vedra Beach, FL
BornJanuary 27, 1952 (age 67)
Baltimore, MD
Height6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Turned pro1972
Retired1984
PlaysRight-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize money$2,782,514
Singles
Career record683–325 (67.76%)
Career titles25
Highest rankingNo. 3 (19 June 1977)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open3R (1980)
French OpenF (1977)
WimbledonSF (1980)
US OpenQF (1977, 1978)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsSF (1977, 1978)
WCT FinalsSF (1981)
Doubles
Career record603–246
Career titles54
Highest rankingNo. 2 (12 December 1976)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenQF (1980)
French OpenW (1975, 1977)
WimbledonW (1976)
US OpenF (1977)

Tennis career

Junior and college

Gottfried was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and is Jewish.[1][2] He began playing tennis at the age of 5, after receiving a racquet as a gift.[3] In all, Gottfried won 14 national junior titles.[4] As a teen Gottfried attended Baylor School[5] in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Piper High School in Sunrise, Florida.[6] In 1970, as a freshman at Trinity University in Texas, he won the USTA boys 18s singles championship, as well as the doubles championship with Alexander Mayer.[7] He was an All-American in 1971 and 1972.

Professional career

Gottfried began his professional tennis career in 1972.[3] He won five tournaments in 1976 and was runner-up at the French Open. Newsweek described him as the "best male tennis player in the world at the moment" in April 1977[3], while World Tennis and Tennis Magazine ranked him as N°4 in their 1977's year-end rankings.[8][9] He won the Italian Open doubles championship in four consecutive years (1974–77). He won the men's doubles at the French Open in 1975 and 1977. In 1976, he won the men's doubles title at Wimbledon. He ended his career tied for 22nd in open era singles titles leaders, and tied for 12th in doubles.[3]

Arthur Ashe liked to recall how Gottfried missed his daily practice session to get married, but atoned by doubling his practice time the next day.[3][10]

Gottfried retired as the player with the greatest number of tour match victories among players who had never won a grand slam. He held this record for 32 years, eventually being succeeded by David Ferrer.

Grand Slam finals

Singles: 1 (1 runner-up)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1977 French Open Clay Argentina Guillermo Vilas 0–6, 3–6, 0–6

Doubles: 7 (3 titles, 4 runners-up)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1975 French Open Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia John Alexander
Australia Phil Dent
6–4, 2–6, 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 1976 French Open Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Fred McNair
United States Sherwood Stewart
6–7, 3–6, 1–6
Winner 1976 Wimbledon Grass Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
3–6, 6–3, 8–6, 2–6, 7–5
Winner 1977 French Open Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Poland Wojtek Fibak
Czechoslovakia Jan Kodeš
7–6, 4–6, 6–3, 6–4
Runner-up 1977 US Open Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
4–6, 0–6
Runner-up 1979 Wimbledon Grass Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Peter Fleming
United States John McEnroe
6–4, 4–6, 2–6, 2–6
Runner-up 1980 French Open Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Victor Amaya
United States Hank Pfister
6–1, 4–6, 4–6, 3–6

Grand Prix, WCT, and Grand Slam finals

Singles (25 titles, 26 runner-ups)

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 1973 Johannesburg WCT, South Africa Hard Chile Jaime Fillol Walkover
Winner 2. 1973 Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. Hard United States Arthur Ashe 6–1, 6–3
Runner-up 1. 1973 Fort Worth, Texas, U.S. Hard United States Eddie Dibbs 5–7, 2–6, 4–6
Runner-up 2. 1973 Christchurch, New Zealand Grass Australia Fred Stolle 6–7, 4–6, 1–6
Winner 3. 1974 Paris Indoor, France Hard (i) United States Eddie Dibbs 6–3, 5–7, 8–6, 6–0
Runner-up 3. 1974 London Carpet United States Jimmy Connors 2–6, 6–7
Winner 4. 1975 Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. Carpet Australia Allan Stone 3–6, 6–2, 6–3
Winner 5. 1975 Dayton, Ohio, U.S. Carpet Australia Geoff Masters 6–4, 4–6, 6–4
Runner-up 4. 1975 Denver WCT, U.S. Carpet United States Jimmy Connors 3–6, 4–6
Winner 6. 1975 Melbourne, Australia Carpet United States Harold Solomon 6–2, 7–6, 6–1
Runner-up 5. 1975 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard United States Harold Solomon 3–6, 2–6, 7–5, 2–6
Runner-up 6. 1976 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet United States Arthur Ashe 2–6, 4–6
Winner 7. 1976 Los Angeles Carpet United States Arthur Ashe 6–2, 6–2
Runner-up 7. 1976 San Francisco, U.S. Carpet United States Roscoe Tanner 6–4, 5–7, 1–6
Runner-up 8. 1976 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard United States Harold Solomon 2–6, 7–6, 3–6, 4–6
Winner 8. 1977 Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. Carpet Argentina Guillermo Vilas 6–3, 7–6
Winner 9. 1977 Palm Springs, California, U.S. Hard Argentina Guillermo Vilas 2–6, 6–1, 6–3
Runner-up 9. 1977 Memphis, Tennessee, U.S. Carpet Sweden Björn Borg 4–6, 3–6, 6–4, 5–7
Winner 10. 1977 Washington Indoor, U.S. Carpet United States Robert Lutz 6–1, 6–2
Winner 11. 1977 La Costa, California, U.S. Hard United States Marty Riessen 6–3, 6–2
Runner-up 10. 1977 Los Angeles Carpet United States Stan Smith 4–6, 6–2, 3–6
Runner-up 11. 1977 Denver, Colorado, U.S. Carpet Sweden Björn Borg 5–7, 2–6
Runner-up 12. 1977 French Open, Paris Clay Argentina Guillermo Vilas 0–6, 3–6, 0–6
Runner-up 13. 1977 Washington, D.C. Clay Argentina Guillermo Vilas 4–6, 5–7
Runner-up 14. 1977 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard Argentina Guillermo Vilas 2–6, 1–6
Runner-up 15. 1977 Los Angeles Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez 5–7, 6–3, 4–6
Runner-up 16. 1977 San Francisco, U.S. Carpet United States Butch Walts 6–4, 3–6, 5–7
Runner-up 17. 1977 Maui, Hawaii, U.S. Hard United States Jimmy Connors 2–6, 0–6
Winner 12. 1977 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) Poland Wojtek Fibak 6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 18. 1977 Paris Indoor, France Hard (i) Italy Corrado Barazzutti 6–7, 6–7, 7–6, 6–3, 4–6
Winner 13. 1978 Washington Indoor, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez 7–5, 7–6
Winner 14. 1978 Dayton, Ohio, U.S. Carpet United States Eddie Dibbs 2–6, 6–4, 7–6
Winner 15. 1978 Houston WCT, U.S. Clay Romania Ilie Năstase 3–6, 6–2, 6–1
Runner-up 19. 1978 Los Angeles Carpet United States Arthur Ashe 2–6, 4–6
Runner-up 20. 1979 Rancho Mirage, California, U.S. Hard United States Roscoe Tanner 4–6, 2–6
Runner-up 21. 1979 Washington Indoor, U.S. Carpet United States Roscoe Tanner 4–6, 4–6
Winner 16. 1979 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Clay United States Eddie Dibbs 6–3, 6–0
Winner 17. 1979 Basel, Switzerland Hard (i) South Africa Johan Kriek 7–5, 6–1, 4–6, 6–3
Winner 18. 1980 Surbiton, United Kingdom Grass United States Sandy Mayer 6–3, 6–3
Winner 19. 1980 Washington, D.C. Clay Argentina José Luis Clerc 7–5, 4–6, 6–4
Winner 20. 1980 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) United States Trey Waltke 6–2, 6–4, 6–3
Winner 21. 1980 Paris Indoor, France Carpet Italy Adriano Panatta 4–6, 6–3, 6–1, 7–6
Runner-up 22. 1981 Brussels, Belgium Carpet United States Jimmy Connors 2–6, 4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 23. 1981 Queen's Club Championships, London Grass United States John McEnroe 6–7, 5–7
Winner 22. 1981 Stowe, Vermont, U.S. Hard United States Tony Graham 6–3, 6–3
Runner-up 24. 1981 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) Czechoslovakia Ivan Lendl 6–1, 0–6, 1–6, 2–6
Winner 23. 1982 Tampa, Florida, U.S. Hard United States Mike Estep 6–7, 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 25. 1982 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States Jimmy Connors 5–7, 0–6
Winner 24. 1982 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) United States Bill Scanlon 6–1, 6–4, 6–0
Runner-up 26. 1982 Wembley, United Kingdom Carpet United States John McEnroe 3–6, 2–6, 4–6
Winner 25. 1983 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) United States Mel Purcell 6–2, 6–3, 7–5

Doubles (54 titles, 41 runner-ups)

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 1973 Philadelphia WCT, U.S. Carpet United States Dick Stockton Australia Roy Emerson
Australia Rod Laver
4–6, 6–3, 6–4
Winner 2. 1973 Las Vegas, U.S. Hard United States Dick Stockton Australia Ken Rosewall
Australia Fred Stolle
6–7, 6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 1. 1973 Cincinnati, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia John Alexander
Australia Phil Dent
6–1, 6–7, 6–7
Winner 3. 1973 Fort Worth, U.S. Hard United States Dick Stockton Australia Owen Davidson
Australia John Newcombe
7–6, 6–4
Runner-up 2. 1973 Hong Kong Hard United States Paul Gerken Australia Colin Dibley
Australia Rod Laver
3–6, 7–5, 15–17
Runner-up 3. 1974 Atlanta WCT, U.S. Clay United States Dick Stockton United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
3–6, 6–3, 6–7
Runner-up 4. 1974 Orlando WCT, U.S. Hard United States Dick Stockton Australia Owen Davidson
Australia John Newcombe
6–7, 3–6
Runner-up 5. 1974 Hamburg, Germany Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez West Germany Jürgen Fassbender
West Germany Hans-Jürgen Pohmann
3–6, 4–6, 4–6
Winner 4. 1974 Rome, Italy Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Spain Juan Gisbert Sr.
Romania Ilie Năstase
6–3, 6–2, 6–3
Runner-up 6. 1974 Chicago, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Tom Gorman
United States Marty Riessen
6–4, 3–6, 5–7
Winner 5. 1974 South Orange, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez India Anand Amritraj
India Vijay Amritraj
7–6, 6–7, 7–6
Runner-up 7. 1974 Los Angeles, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 8. 1974 Madrid, Spain Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez France Patrice Dominguez
Spain Antonio Muñoz
1–6, 3–6
Runner-up 9. 1974 Tehran, Iran Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Spain Manuel Orantes
Argentina Guillermo Vilas
6–7, 6–2, 2–6
Runner-up 10. 1974 Paris Indoor, France Hard (i) Mexico Raúl Ramírez France Patrice Dominguez
France François Jauffret
5–7, 4–6
Runner-up 11. 1974 London, England Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Jimmy Connors
Romania Ilie Năstase
6–3, 6–7, 3–6
Winner 6. 1975 Philadelphia WCT, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Dick Stockton
United States Erik Van Dillen
3–6, 6–3, 7–6
Runner-up 12. 1975 Dayton Indoor, U.S. Carpet United States Paul Gerken Australia Ray Ruffels
Australia Allan Stone
6–7, 5–7
Winner 7. 1975 St. Petersburg WCT, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Charlie Pasarell
United States Roscoe Tanner
6–4, 6–4
Winner 8. 1975 La Costa WCT, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Charlie Pasarell
United States Roscoe Tanner
7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 13. 1975 São Paulo WCT, Brazil Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
7–6, 6–7, 6–7
Runner-up 14. 1975 Caracas WCT, Venezuela Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
5–7, 6–4, 2–6
Winner 9. 1975 Orlando WCT, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Colin Dibley
Australia Ray Ruffels
6–4, 6–4
Winner 10. 1975 World Doubles WCT, Mexico Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United Kingdom Mark Cox
South Africa Cliff Drysdale
7–6, 6–7, 6–2, 7–6
Winner 11. 1975 Dallas WCT, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
7–5, 6–3, 4–6, 2–6, 7–5
Winner 12. 1975 Rome, Italy Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Jimmy Connors
Romania Ilie Năstase
6–4, 7–6, 2–6, 6–1
Winner 13. 1975 French Open, Paris Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia John Alexander
Australia Phil Dent
6–4, 2–6, 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 15. 1975 Washington, D.C., U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
5–7, 6–2, 1–6
Winner 14. 1975 Boston, U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States John Andrews
United States Mike Estep
4–6, 6–3, 7–6
Runner-up 16. 1975 Melbourne Indoor, Australia Grass Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
4–6, 0–6
Winner 15. 1975 Sydney Indoor, Australia Hard (i) Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
6–4, 6–2
Winner 16. 1975 Perth, Australia Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
2–6, 6–4, 6–4, 6–0
Winner 17. 1975 Tokyo, Japan Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Spain Juan Gisbert Sr.
Spain Manuel Orantes
7–6, 6–4
Winner 18. 1976 Monterrey WCT, Mexico Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
6–2, 4–6, 6–3
Winner 19. 1976 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Arthur Ashe
Netherlands Tom Okker
6–4, 7–5
Winner 20. 1976 St. Louis WCT, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia John Alexander
Australia Phil Dent
6–4, 6–2
Winner 21. 1976 México City WCT, México Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Egypt Ismail El Shafei
New Zealand Brian Fairlie
6–4, 7–6
Winner 22. 1976 Jackson WCT, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
7–5, 4–6, 6–0
Winner 23. 1976 Caracas WCT, Venezuela Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Jeff Borowiak
Romania Ilie Năstase
7–5, 6–4
Winner 24. 1976 Rome, Italy Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Geoff Masters
Australia John Newcombe
7–6, 5–7, 6–3, 3–6, 6–3
Runner-up 17. 1976 French Open, Paris Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Fred McNair
United States Sherwood Stewart
6–7, 3–6, 1–6
Winner 25. 1976 Wimbledon, London Grass Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
3–6, 6–3, 8–6, 2–6, 7–5
Winner 26. 1976 Washington, D.C., U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Arthur Ashe
United States Jimmy Connors
6–3, 6–3
Winner 27. 1976 North Conway, U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Argentina Ricardo Cano
Paraguay Victor Pecci
6–3, 6–0
Winner 28. 1976 Indianapolis, U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Fred McNair
United States Sherwood Stewart
6–2, 6–2
Winner 29. 1976 Woodlands Doubles, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Phil Dent
Australia Allan Stone
6–1, 6–4, 5–7, 7–6
Runner-up 18. 1976 San Francisco, U.S. Carpet South Africa Bob Hewitt United States Dick Stockton
United States Roscoe Tanner
3–6, 4–6
Winner 30. 1976 Barcelona, Spain Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
7–6, 6–4
Runner-up 19. 1976 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
4–6, 0–4, ret.
Runner-up 20. 1976 Wembley, England Carpet Poland Wojtek Fibak United States Stan Smith
United States Roscoe Tanner
6–7, 3–6
Winner 31. 1976 Johannesburg WCT, South Africa Hard United States Sherwood Stewart Spain Juan Gisbert Sr.
United States Stan Smith
1–6, 6–1, 6–2, 7–6
Winner 32. 1977 Miami, U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Paul Kronk
Australia Cliff Letcher
7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 21. 1977 Washington Indoor, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
3–6, 5–7
Winner 33. 1977 Rome, Italy Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Fred McNair
United States Sherwood Stewart
6–7, 7–6, 7–5
Winner 34. 1977 French Open, Paris Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Poland Wojtek Fibak
Czechoslovakia Jan Kodeš
7–6, 4–6, 6–3, 6–4
Winner 35. 1977 North Conway, U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Fred McNair
United States Sherwood Stewart
7–5, 6–3
Runner-up 22. 1977 U.S. Open, New York Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
4–6, 0–6
Runner-up 23. 1977 Maui, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
6–7, 4–6
Winner 36. 1977 Paris Indoor, France Hard (i) Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Jeff Borowiak
United Kingdom Roger Taylor
6–2, 6–0
Runner-up 24. 1977 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) Mexico Raúl Ramírez Poland Wojtek Fibak
Netherlands Tom Okker
3–6, 3–6
Runner-up 25. 1977 Wembley, England Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Sandy Mayer
South Africa Frew McMillan
3–6, 6–7
Winner 37. 1978 Memphis, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Phil Dent
Australia John Newcombe
3–6, 7–6, 6–2
Winner 38. 1978 Dayton, U.S. Carpet Australia Geoff Masters United States Hank Pfister
United States Butch Walts
6–3, 6–4
Winner 39. 1979 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet United States John McEnroe Romania Ion Ţiriac
Argentina Guillermo Vilas
6–4, 6–3
Runner-up 26. 1979 Wimbledon, London Grass Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Peter Fleming
United States John McEnroe
6–4, 4–6, 2–6, 2–6
Runner-up 27. 1979 Washington, U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Marty Riessen
United States Sherwood Stewart
6–2, 3–6, 4–6
Winner 40. 1979 Columbus, U.S. Clay United States Robert Lutz United States Tim Gullikson
United States Tom Gullikson
4–6, 6–3, 7–6
Winner 41. 1979 Cincinnati, U.S. Hard Romania Ilie Năstase United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
1–6, 6–3, 7–6
Runner-up 28. 1979 Basel, Switzerland Hard (i) Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 29. 1979 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
4–6, 6–3, 1–6
Winner 42. 1980 Masters Doubles WCT, London Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez Poland Wojtek Fibak
Netherlands Tom Okker
3–6, 6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
Runner-up 30. 1980 Baltimore WCT, U.S. Carpet South Africa Frew McMillan United States Tim Gullikson
United States Marty Riessen
6–2, 3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 31. 1980 Philadelphia, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Peter Fleming
United States John McEnroe
3–6, 6–7
Runner-up 32. 1980 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet South Africa Frew McMillan United States Fritz Buehning
South Africa Johan Kriek
6–3, 3–6, 6–7
Winner 43. 1980 Memphis, U.S. Carpet United States John McEnroe Australia Rod Frawley
Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd
6–3, 6–7, 7–6
Runner-up 33. 1980 French Open, Paris Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Victor Amaya
United States Hank Pfister
6–1, 4–6, 4–6, 3–6
Winner 44. 1980 North Conway, U.S. Clay United States Jimmy Connors South Africa Kevin Curren
United States Steve Denton
7–6, 6–2
Winner 45. 1980 Columbus, U.S. Hard United States Sandy Mayer United States Peter Fleming
United States Eliot Teltscher
6–4, 6–2
Winner 46. 1980 Sawgrass Doubles, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
7–6, 6–4, 2–6, 7–6
Runner-up 34. 1980 Paris Indoor, France Carpet South Africa Raymond Moore Italy Paolo Bertolucci
Italy Adriano Panatta
4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 35. 1980 Sydney Outdoor, Australia Grass United States Vitas Gerulaitis Australia Peter McNamara
Australia Paul McNamee
2–6, 4–6
Runner-up 36. 1981 Philadelphia, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Marty Riessen
United States Sherwood Stewart
2–6, 2–6
Runner-up 37. 1981 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States Tim Gullikson
South Africa Bernard Mitton
6–3, 2–6, 3–6
Winner 47. 1981 Milan, Italy Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez United States John McEnroe
United States Peter Rennert
7–6, 6–3
Runner-up 38. 1981 Stowe, U.S. Hard United States Robert Lutz South Africa Johan Kriek
United States Larry Stefanki
6–2, 1–6, 2–6
Winner 48. 1982 La Quinta, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez United Kingdom John Lloyd
United States Dick Stockton
6–4, 3–6, 6–2
Runner-up 39. 1982 Tampa, U.S. Hard United States Hank Pfister United States Tim Gullikson
United States Tom Gullikson
2–6, 3–6
Winner 49. 1982 Sawgrass Doubles, U.S. Clay Mexico Raúl Ramírez Australia Mark Edmondson
Australia Kim Warwick
W/O
Winner 50. 1982 Paris Indoor, France Hard (i) United States Bruce Manson United States Jay Lapidus
United States Richard Meyer
6–4, 6–2
Winner 51. 1982 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard South Africa Frew McMillan Israel Shlomo Glickstein
Zimbabwe Andrew Pattison
6–2, 6–2
Runner-up 40. 1983 Masters Doubles WCT, London Carpet Mexico Raúl Ramírez Switzerland Heinz Günthardt
Hungary Balázs Taróczy
3–6, 5–7, 6–7
Winner 52. 1983 La Quinta, U.S. Hard Mexico Raúl Ramírez South Africa Tian Viljoen
South Africa Danie Visser
6–3, 6–3
Runner-up 41. 1983 Hamburg, Germany Clay Australia Mark Edmondson Switzerland Heinz Günthardt
Hungary Balázs Taróczy
6–7, 6–4, 4–6
Winner 53. 1983 London/Queen's Club, England Grass Australia Paul McNamee South Africa Kevin Curren
United States Steve Denton
6–4, 6–3
Winner 54. 1984 North Conway, U.S. Clay Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd Brazil Cassio Motta
United States Blaine Willenborg
6–4, 6–2

Davis Cup

Gottfried was 7–7 in Davis Cup play for the US between 1975 and 1982[11] and won it twice (in 1978 and 1982).

Halls of Fame & awards

Gottfried won the 1974 and 1975 ATP Doubles Team of the Year Award with partner Raúl Ramírez.

He won the 1976 ATP Most Improved Player Award.[12]

He won the ATP Sportsmanship award in 1984.[3]

Gottfried was inducted into the Intercollegiate Tennis Association's Intercollegiate Tennis Hall of Fame in 1990.[13]

Gottfried, who is Jewish, was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.[4]

Life after playing career

Gottfried now lives in Ponte Vedra, Florida.[3] In 2007 Gottfried joined the coaching staff at the Harold Solomon Tennis Institute in Fort Lauderdale.

In 2010, Gottfried coached with the Bollettieri Tennis Program at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida.

He was elected to the ATP Player Council in 2012 as an alumni representative.[14][15]

In 2015, he joined the coaching staff at the Bolles School[16]

His younger brother, Larry was also a tennis player.

See also

References

  1. ^ Jewish Post 12 March 1982 — Hoosier State Chronicles: Indiana's Digital Historic Newspaper Program
  2. ^ Futterman, Matthew (2017-04-18). Players: How Sports Became a Business. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 9781476716961.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Gottfried, Brian". Jews in Sports. Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  4. ^ a b "Brian Gottfried". International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  5. ^ Detail - Baylor School
  6. ^ Thuma, Cynthia (2007). Sport Lauderdale: Big Names and Big Games : a Sports Enthusiast's Guide to Broward County, Florida. History Press. p. 70. ISBN 9781596291454.
  7. ^ "USTA Boys 18 & 16: Past Winners". Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  8. ^ Jornal do Brasil - Búsqueda en el archivo de Google Noticias
  9. ^ LLC, New York Media (1984-04-23). New York Magazine. New York Media, LLC. In 1977, he was named by Tennis Magazine to a number four world ranking, one notch above Gerulaitis
  10. ^ "Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis Players – Brian Gottfried". Atptennis.com. Retrieved April 30, 2010.
  11. ^ "Players". daviscup.com. Retrieved April 30, 2010.
  12. ^ "Tennis - ATP World Tour - Tennis Players – Brian Gottfried". ATP World Tour. Retrieved April 30, 2010.
  13. ^ "Halls of Fame". www.itatennis.com. Intercollegiate Tennis Association.
  14. ^ "ATP Structure". ATP. Retrieved 25 June 2013.
  15. ^ "ATP ANNOUNCES NEW PLAYER COUNCIL". ATP. Retrieved 25 June 2013.
  16. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-10-07. Retrieved 2015-09-28.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

Awards
Preceded by
Wojtek Fibak
ATP Most Improved Player
1977
Succeeded by
John McEnroe
1974 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1974 Commercial Union Assurance Grand Prix was a professional tennis circuit administered by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) which served as a forerunner to the current Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour and the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour. The circuit consisted of the four modern Grand Slam tournaments and open tournaments recognised by the ILTF. The season-ending Commercial Union Assurance Masters and Davis Cup Final are included in this calendar but did not count towards the Grand Prix ranking.

1974 Paris Open

The 1974 Paris Open, also known as the Jean Becker Open for sponsorship reasons, was a men's Grand Prix tennis tournament played on indoor carpet courts. It was the 6th edition of the Paris Open (later known as the Paris Masters). It took place at the Palais omnisports de Paris-Bercy in Paris, France from 28 October through 3 November 1974. Brian Gottfried won the singles title.

1975 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1975 Commercial Union Assurance Grand Prix was a professional tennis circuit administered by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) which served as a forerunner to the current Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour and the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour. The circuit consisted of the four modern Grand Slam tournaments and open tournaments recognised by the ILTF. The Commercial Union Assurance Masters, Davis Cup Final and Nations Cup are included in this calendar but did not count towards the Grand Prix.

The men's schedule started in December 1974 with the Australian Open and continued in May 1975 following the conclusion of the rival 1975 World Championship Tennis circuit which ran from January to early May.

1975 World Championship Tennis circuit

The 1975 World Championship Tennis circuit was one of the two rival professional male tennis circuits of 1975. It was organized by World Championship Tennis (WCT). The 1975 circuit divided the players in three groups, Red, Blue and Green who played 24 tournaments in 12 countries. The first tournament, U.S. Professional Indoor Championships, was a combined event as was the season's final which was played in Dallas by the eight best performers and was won by American Arthur Ashe who defeated Björn Borg from Sweden in four sets.Additionally there were three special non–ranking events; the CBS Classic (Puerto Rico, 13–19 January), the Aetna World Cup team contest between Australia and America (Hartford, 6–9 March) and the Rothmans International Trophy an eight-nation contest between 16 players (London, 4–8 March).

The total prize money for the 1975 WCT circuit was $2,068,500 which included $100,000 bonus money.

1976 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1976 Commercial Union Assurance Grand Prix was a professional tennis circuit administered by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) which served as a forerunner to the current Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour and the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour. The circuit consisted of the four modern Grand Slam tournaments and open tournaments recognised by the ILTF. The Commercial Union Assurance Masters is included in this calendar but did not count towards the Grand Prix ranking.The 1976 Grand Prix circuit consisted of 48 tournaments held in 21 different countries.

1976 World Championship Tennis circuit

The 1976 World Championship Tennis circuit was one of the two rival professional male tennis circuits of 1976. It was organized by World Championship Tennis (WCT) and consisted of a schedule of 25 tournaments leading up to a singles WCT Finals play-off in Dallas and a doubles play-off in Kansas City in May. A total of 54 players participated, 30 players less than in the previous three years, and the group system used in the previous editions was replaced by a single pool. The U.S. Pro Indoor was the only tournament in which all players participated, all other tournaments had a 16 men draw. The season final was played by the eight best performers and was won by the Swede Björn Borg who defeated Guillermo Vilas from Argentina in four sets. The total prize money for the 1976 WCT circuit was $2,400,000, including a $320,000 Avis Challenge Cup round–robin special event played in Hawaii in January and May.The Aetna World Cup between teams of the US and Australia was played in March in Hartford and was won by the US 6–1.

1977 French Open – Men's Singles

Adriano Panatta was the defending champion, but lost in the quarterfinals to Raúl Ramírez.

Third-seeded Guillermo Vilas defeated Brian Gottfried 6–0, 6–3, 6–0 in the final to win the Men's Singles tennis title at the 1977 French Open.

1977 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1977 Colgate-Palmolive Grand Prix was a professional tennis circuit administered by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF, later the ITF) which served as a forerunner to the current Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour and the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour. The circuit consisted of the four modern Grand Slam tournaments and open tournaments recognised by the ILTF. The Colgate-Palmolive Masters is included in this calendar but did not count towards the Grand Prix ranking. Colgate-Palmolive was the new tour sponsor, taking over from Commercial Union. Guillermo Vilas won the Grand Prix circuit, having accumulated the most points (2,047), and received the largest share from the bonus pool ($300,000). The top eight points ranked singles players as well as the top four doubles teams qualified for the season-ending Masters tournament

1978 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1978 Colgate-Palmolive Grand Prix was a professional tennis circuit held that year. It consisted of four Grand Slam tournaments, the Grand Prix tournaments and the Nations Cup, a team event. In addition eight World Championship Tennis (WCT) tournaments, a separate professional tennis circuit held from 1971 through 1977, were incorporated into the Grand Prix circuit. Jimmy Connors won 10 of the 84 tournaments which secured him the first place in the Grand Prix points ranking. However he did not play enough tournaments (13) to qualify for largest share ($300,000) of the bonus pool, which instead went to third–ranked Eddie Dibbs.

1979 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1979 Colgate-Palmolive Grand Prix was a professional tennis circuit held that year. It consisted of four Grand Slam tournaments, the Grand Prix tournaments and the Nations Cup, a team event.

1980 French Open – Men's Doubles

The Men's Doubles tournament at the 1980 French Open was held from 26 May to 8 June 1980 on the outdoor clay courts at the Stade Roland Garros in Paris, France. Victor Amaya and Hank Pfister won the title, defeating Brian Gottfried and Raúl Ramírez in the final.

1980 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1980 Volvo Grand Prix was a men's professional tennis circuit held that year. It incorporated the four grand slam tournaments, the Grand Prix tournaments. The Grand Prix circuit is a precursor to the ATP Tour.

Volvo became the new tour sponsor of the Grand Prix circuit after Colgate-Palmolive decided to end its sponsorship.

1980 Paris Open

The 1980 Paris Open, also known that year as the Crocodile Open, was a Grand Prix tennis tournament played on indoor carpet courts. It was the 12th edition of the Paris Open (later known as the Paris Masters). It took place at the Palais omnisports de Paris-Bercy in Paris, France from 27 October through 2 November 1980. Brian Gottfried won the singles title.

1981 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1981 Volvo Grand Prix was the only men's professional tennis circuit held that year. It consisted of the four Grand Slam tournaments and the Grand Prix tournaments. The World Championship Tennis (WCT) Tour was incorporated into the Grand Prix circuit. The WCT tour consisted of eight regular tournaments, a season's final, three tournaments categorized as special events and a doubles championship. In total 89 tournaments were held divided over 29 countries. The circuit was administered by the Men's International Professional Tennis Council (MIPTC).

Dick Stockton (tennis)

Richard LaClede Stockton (born February 18, 1951 in Charlottesville, Virginia), is a former professional tennis player from the United States. In addition to his playing career, he was the head coach of the men's tennis team at the University of Virginia. for three years, from 1998-2001.

Stockton's highest world ranking was World No. 8. He reached the semifinals of Wimbledon in 1974, the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open in 1976 and '77 and the semifinals in the 1978 French Open. Stockton played on the U.S. Davis Cup Team five times (1973, '75, '76, '77, '79), including the U.S. Davis Cup Championship Team in 1979.

Geoff Masters

Geoff Masters (born 19 September 1950) is an Australian former tennis player. He was part of doubles winning pairs in the US Open, Australian Open and Wimbledon tournaments during the 1970s.

Raúl Ramírez

Raúl Ramírez (born 20 June 1953) is a retired Mexican professional tennis player. He was active during the 1970s and 1980s. Ramírez was the first player to finish first in both singles and doubles Grand Prix point standings, accomplishing the feat in 1976. He attended and played tennis at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

Ross Case

Ross Case (born 1 November 1951) is an Australian former tennis player. His career-high singles ranking was world no. 14.

With Geoff Masters, he won two Grand Slam doubles titles: in 1974 at the Australian Open and in 1977 at Wimbledon. He was also runner-up in 1976 at Wimbledon. He played in the Australian Davis Cup team in 1971, 1972, 1976, 1978, and 1979.

Sherwood Stewart

Sherwood Stewart (born June 6, 1946) was an amateur and professional tennis player who was active in the 1970s and 1980s. Stewart was ranked as high as No. 60 in the world in singles on the ATP Rankings on December 31, 1978, and No. 4 in doubles on January 3, 1983.

He attended Lamar University, in Beaumont, Texas, and graduated in 1969. He was the NCAA College Division Singles Champion in 1967 and was inducted into the Lamar University Hall of Honor.

He won 52 doubles titles, the biggest of them coming at the 1984 Australian Open, the French Open in 1976 and 1982, in Cincinnati in 1974, in Monte Carlo in 1984, and in Hamburg in 1976. He was also in three additional Grand Slam doubles finals during his career.

After retiring from playing, he became a coach, most notably of Zina Garrison.

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