Brian Dawkins

Brian Patrick Dawkins Sr (born October 13, 1973) is a former American football safety who played 16 seasons in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at Clemson and was drafted by the Eagles in the second round of the 1996 NFL Draft, whom he was a member of for 13 seasons. In his last three seasons, he played for the Denver Broncos.

Regarded as one of the greatest safeties of all time, Dawkins was viewed as the leader of the Eagles' defense, named to nine Pro Bowls, and a five-time first-team All-Pro during his career. He also made one Super Bowl appearance with the Eagles in XXXIX, which was played in his home city of Jacksonville, Florida. Dawkins was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2018.[1]

In addition to his playing career, Dawkins served the Eagles as an executive of football operations for player development from 2016 to 2018 and was with the organization when they won Super Bowl LII.

Brian Dawkins Sr
refer to caption
Dawkins in 2014
No. 20
Position:Safety
Personal information
Born:October 13, 1973 (age 45)
Jacksonville, Florida
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school:Willam M. Raines
(Jacksonville, Florida)
College:Clemson
NFL Draft:1996 / Round: 2 / Pick: 61
Career history
As player:
As administrator:
Career highlights and awards
As player

As administrator

Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:1,131
Sacks:26.0
Forced fumbles:36
Fumble recoveries:19
Interceptions:37
Total touchdowns:4
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

Dawkins attended Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. A three-year starter at free safety for the Clemson Tigers football team, he finished his career with 247 tackles and 11 interceptions. He received first-team All-ACC Honors in 1995 and was selected by the Associated Press and Sporting News as a second-team All-American as a senior when his team-high six interceptions tied him for the conference lead. He was named the first-team strong safety on Clemson's all-centennial team in 1996 and was selected to their Athletic Hall of Fame in 2009.[2][3] On January 11, 2013, Clemson University established the Brian Dawkins Lifetime Achievement Award to annually honor a former Clemson player for their performance on the field, contributions in leadership and community service.[4][5]

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
5 ft 11.3 in
(1.81 m)
189 lb
(86 kg)
4.61 s 1.61 s 4.39 s 35 in
(0.89 m)
10 19 reps
All values from NFL Combine[7]

Philadelphia Eagles

The Philadelphia Eagles selected Dawkins in the second round (61st overall) of the 1996 NFL Draft. Dawkins was the fifth safety drafted in 1996.[8] The Philadelphia Eagles used the compensatory pick they received from the departure of Seth Joyner in free agency in 1994.[9]

1996

Dawkins entered training camp slated as the backup free safety behind Eric Zomalt who earned the starting role after Greg Jackson departed in free agency. Head coach Ray Rhodes named Dawkins the backup free safety to start the regular season, behind Eric Zomalt.[10]

He made his professional regular season debut in the Philadelphia Eagles' season-opener at the Washington Redskins and made one tackle in their 17–14 victory. The following week, Dawkins earned his first career start and collected a season-high 11 combined tackles during a 39–13 loss at the Green Bay Packers in Week 2.[11] On September 18, 1996, head coach Ray Rhodes officially named Dawkins the starting free safety, alongside strong safety Mike Zordich, after he surpassed Eric Zomalt on the depth chart.[12] Zomalt was subsequently released the following day.[10] On September 22, 1996, Dawkins recorded four combined tackles and made his first career interception during a 33–18 win at the Atlanta Falcons in Week 4. Dawkins made his first career interception off a pass by Falcons' backup quarterback Bobby Hebert, that was originally intended for wide receiver Bert Emanuel, and returned it for a 30-yard gain to seal the Eagles' victory in the fourth quarter.[13] In Week 5, he recorded eight combined tackles, forced a fumble, and made his first career sack in the Eagles' 23–19 loss to the Dallas Cowboys. Dawkins made his first career sack on Cowboys' quarterback Troy Aikman during the third quarter and also stripped the ball during the play. The ball was recovered by Dawkins' teammate Rhett Hall and returned for a 32-yard touchdown.[14] He finished his rookie season in 1996 with 75 combined tackles, three interceptions, a sack, and a forced fumble in 14 games and 13 starts.[15] The Philadelphia Eagles' defense allowed ranked 21st in the league overall, but allowed the sixth fewest passing yards (2,979 yds) in 1996.[16]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished second in the NFC East with a 10–6 record and earned a wildcard berth. On December 29, 1996, Dawkins started in his first career playoff game and recorded six combined tackles as they lost 14-0 to the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Wildcard Game.[17][11]

1997

Defensive coordinator Emmitt Thomas retained Dawkins and Mike Zordich as the starting safeties in 1997, along with cornerbacks Troy Vincent and Bobby Taylor.[18]

External video
NFL Films Encore: Brian Dawkins

On September 28, 1997, he collected a season-high eight combined tackles during a 28–19 loss at the Minnesota Vikings in Week 5. Dawkins was inactive for a Week 8 victory against the Arizona Cardinals due to an injury.[19] On December 7, 1997, Dawkins recorded seven combined tackles and returned an interception for his first career touchdown during the Eagles' 32–21 loss to the New York Giants in Week 15. Dawkins intercepted a pass by quarterback Danny Kanell, that was initially thrown to wide receiver Chris Calloway, and returned it for a 64-yard touchdown in the third quarter.[20] He finished the 1997 season with 75 combined tackles, three interceptions, and a touchdown in 15 games and 15 starts.[21] The Eagles' defense finished ranked 24th overall, but allowed the seventh fewest passing yards (2,923 yds) in 1997.[22]

1998

Head coach Ray Rhodes elected to retain the starting secondary for the second consecutive season.[23] On December 7, 1998, Dawkins collected a season-high eight combined tackles and forced a fumble during a 31–21 loss to the New York Giants in Week 15.[24] Dawkins was sidelined for two games (Weeks 7–9) due to an injury.[25] Dawkins finished the 1998 season with 55 combined tackles, two interceptions, a sack, and a forced fumble in 14 games and 14 starts.[26] On December 28, 1998, the Philadelphia Eagles fired head coach Ray Rhodes after they finished with a 3–13 record in 1998.[27]

1999

On July 16, 1999, the Philadelphia Eagles signed Dawkins to a three-year, $1.27 million contract.[28]

Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starting free safety to begin the regular season, alongside strong safety Tim Hauck.[29] In Week 3, he made six combined tackles, forced a fumble, and made an interception during a 26–0 loss at the Buffalo Bills. Dawkins intercepted a pass by quarterback Doug Flutie, that was originally intended for wide receiver Peerless Price, in the second quarter.[30] His performance was his third consecutive game with an interception. In Week 9, he collected a season-high eight combined tackles in the Eagles' 33–7 loss at the Carolina Panthers.[31] He finished the 1999 season with 73 combined tackles, six forced fumbles, four interceptions, 1.5 sacks, and a touchdown in 14 games and 14 starts.[32] Dawkins flourished in his first season under defensive coordinator Jim Johnson and was subsequently named to the 2000 Pro Bowl, marking the first Pro Bowl selection of his career.[33][12]

2000

In Week 11, Dawkins collected a season-high eight combined tackles during a 26–23 victory at the Pittsburgh Steelers. The following week, he recorded seven combined tackles and made a season-high two sacks on Cardinals' quarterback Jake Plummer during the Eagles' 34–9 win at the Arizona Cardinals in Week 12.[34] Dawkins finished the 2000 season with a total of 75 combined tackles, four interceptions, two sacks, and a forced fumble in 13 games and 13 starts.[35]

2001

Head coach Andy Reid retained the core of the starting secondary as the starters, including Dawkins, Troy Vincent, and Bobby Taylor. Dawkins was paired with starting strong safety Damon Moore in 2001.[36]

Bdawk4
Dawkins before a 2007 Eagles game

He started in the Philadelphia Eagles' season-opener against the St. Louis Rams and collected a season-high eight combined tackles and deflected three passes in their 20–17 loss. On December 9, 2001, Dawkins tied his season-high of eight combined tackles, broke up two passes, forced a fumble, and returned a fumble recovery for a touchdown during the Eagles' 24–14 win against the San Diego Chargers in Week 13. Dawkins forced a fumble by Chargers' running back LaDanian Tomlinson in the first quarter and recovered the ball before returning it for a 49-yard touchdown.[37] On December 16, 2001, he made six solo tackles, two pass deflections, and intercepted two passes by quarterback Tony Banks in the Eagles' 20–6 victory against the Washington Redskins in Week 14.[38] He finished the season with 68 combined tackles (56 solo), 14 passes defensed, two interceptions, two forced fumbles, 1.5 sacks, and a touchdown in 15 games and 15 starts.[15] The Philadelphia Eagles defense ranked second in the league in 2001 and the secondary continued to have success under position coaches Leslie Frazier and Steve Spagnuolo. The secondary allowed the second fewest yards in the league (2,928 yds) and allowed the second fewest touchdown passes (13).[39] On January 3, 2002, Dawkins was one of five Philadelphia Eagles' players named to the 2002 Pro Bowl.[40]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished first in the NFC East with an 11–5 record. Head coach Andy Reid opted to rest Dawkins for the Eagles' Week 17 victory at the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as they had already clinched a playoff berth. On January 12, 2002, Dawkins recorded two combined tackles, broke up two passes, and made an interception during a 31–0 win against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the NFC Wildcard Game. The following week, they defeated the Chicago Bears 33–10 in the NFC Divisional Round. On January 27, 2002, Dawkins recorded six solo tackles and deflected a pass as the Eagles lost 29–24 at the St. Louis Rams in the NFC Championship Game.[41]

2002

Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starting free safety to begin the regular season, alongside strong safety Blaine Bishop.[42] The secondary also included returning cornerbacks Troy Vincent, Bobby Taylor, and Al Harris.

External video
Brian Dawkins' Quadrafecta Game (2002)
Brian Dawkins' sets unreal record

On September 29, 2002, Dawkins recorded six combined tackles, a sack, two pass deflections, an interception, forced a fumble, and caught his first career touchdown pass during a 35–17 victory against the Houston Texans in Week 4. Dawkins' 57-yard touchdown reception came on a shuffle pass by running back Brian Mitchell during a fake punt in the third quarter. Dawkins became the first player in NFL history to make a sack, an interception, recover a fumble, and have a touchdown reception in a single game.[43] In Week 17, he collected a season-high ten combined tackles (seven solo) during a 10–7 loss at the New York Giants. Dawkins started all 16 games in 2002 and recorded 91 combined tackles (62 solo), nine passes defensed, five forced fumbles, three sacks, two interceptions, and one touchdown reception.[15] Jimmy Johnson's defense continued to have moderate success and finished the season ranked second behind the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Eagles' defense also ranked seventh in passing yards allowed (3,094 yds) and tied for seventh in passing touchdowns allowed (18). On January 14, 2003, it was announced that Dawkins was selected to play in the 2003 Pro Bowl. The Eagles' secondary had three players selected in 2003, including Troy Vincent and Bobby Taylor.[44]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished first in the NFC East with a 12–4 record and earned a first round bye. On January 11, 2003, Dawkins made four combined tackles, a pass deflection, and an interception during a 20–6 victory against the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Divisional Round. They were eliminated from the playoffs the following week after losing 27–10 to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the NFC Championship Game.[45]

2003

On April 28, 2003, the Philadelphia Eagles signed Dawkins to a six-year, $43 million contract extension that includes a signing bonus of $8 million. The contract extension was added to the one year Dawkins had remaining on his pre-existing contract.[46]

Dawkins remained the starting free safety in 2003 and was coached by defensive backs coach Steve Spagnuolo and assistant defensive backs coach Sean McDermott. Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starter to begin the regular season, along with starting strong safety Michael Lewis and cornerbacks Troy Vincent, Bobby Taylor, and Lito Sheppard.[47] He started in the Philadelphia Eagles' season-opener against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and collected a season-high nine combined tackles before exiting in the fourth quarter of their 17–0 loss due to a sprained ankle. His injury sidelined him for the next eight games (Weeks 2–10).[48] Dawkins was also inactive for the Eagles' Week 12 win against the New Orleans Saints due to a foot injury.[49] He finished the 2003 season with 35 combined tackles (28 solo), five pass deflections, an interception, and was credited with half a sack in seven games and seven starts.[15]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished atop their division with a 12–4 record. On January 11, 2004, Dawkins recorded eight solo tackles, deflected a pass, and returned an interception by Brett Favre for a 35-yard gain to set up a 31-yard field goal to help the Eagles win the NFC Divisional Round against the Green Bay Packers 20–17.[50] The following week, they lost to the Carolina Panthers 14–3 in the NFC Championship Game after Eagles' quarterback Donovan McNabb was intercepted three times by Panthers' safety Ricky Manning.[51]

2004

Dawkins and Michael Lewis returned as the starting safety duo and also played alongside cornerbacks Lito Sheppard and Sheldon Brown after Troy Vincent departed in free agency.[52] On November 7, 2004, Dawkins collected a season-high nine solo tackles, broke up a pass, and made an interception during a 27–3 loss at the Pittsburgh Steelers. In Week 14, he made six combined tackles, a pass deflection, and an interception in the Eagles' 17–14 win at the Washington Redskins.[53] His interception continued his streak of three consecutive games with an interception. On December 23, 2004, it was announced that Dawkins was selected to play in the 2005 Pro Bowl, along with Michael Lewis and Lito Sheppard.[54] He finished the 2004 season with 69 combined tackles (64 solo), eight passes defensed, four interceptions, three sacks, and two forced fumbles in 15 games and 15 starts. Head coach Andy Reid elected to rest Dawkins for the Eagles' Week 17 matchup against the Cincinnati Bengals as they had already clinched a playoff berth.

External video
Dawkins gets clean hit on Alge Crumpler

The Philadelphia Eagles finished first in the NFC East with a 13–3 record and earned a first round bye. The Eagles reached the NFC Championship Game after losing and being eliminated from the playoffs in three consecutive seasons. On January 23, 2005, Dawkins made a tackle, two pass deflections, and intercepted a pass by Falcons' quarterback Michael Vick during a 27–10 win against the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Championship Game. Dawkins played a key role and delivered a devastating hit on Falcons' tight end Alge Crumpler during the game. On February 6, 2005, Dawkins recorded five combined tackles as the Eagles lost 24–21 to the New England Patriots in Super Bowl.[53] This became Dawkins' first and only Super Bowl appearance.

2005

Defensive coordinator Jim Johnson retained the starting secondary in 2005. On December 11, 2005, Dawkins made four combined tackles, a season-high four pass deflections, a sack, and an interception in the Eagles' 26-23 loss to the New York Giants in Week 14. In Week 16, Dawkins collected a season-high eight combined tackles during a 27-21 loss at the Arizona Cardinals.[55] He started in all 16 games in 2005 and recorded 77 combined tackles (66 solo), a career-high 19 pass deflections, four forced fumbles, 3.5 sacks, and three interceptions.[15]

On January 26, 2006, it was announced that Dawkins was named to the 2006 Pro Bowl as a late-replacement for Chicago Bears' safety Mike Brown who was inactive due to an injury.[56]

2006

Head coach Andy Reid elected to retain the Dawkins and Michael Lewis as the starting safety duo, along with cornerbacks Sheldon Brown and Lito Sheppard in 2006. In Week 6, Dawkins began playing alongside Sean Considine after he surpassed Michael Lewis on the depth chart and remained the starter for the rest of the season.[57] On December 17, 2006, Dawkins collected a season-high 12 combined tackles (11 solo), two pass deflections, and an interception during a 36–22 win at the New York Giants in Week 15.[58] On December 20, 2006, Dawkins was named to the 2007 Pro Bowl. Dawkins started in all 16 games in 2006 and recorded 93 combined tackles (71 solo), nine pass deflections, five forced fumbles, four pass interceptions, and a sack.[15]

2007

Dawkins returned as the starting free safety in 2007, alongside strong safety Sean Considine. On September 17, 2007, he recorded four solo tackles and deflected a pass before exiting the Eagles' 20–12 loss to the Washington Redskins on Monday Night Football due to an injury. Dawkins was sidelined for the next five games (Weeks 3–8) due to a neck injury he sustained against the Redskins.[59] In Week 10, he collected a season-high eight combined tackles and deflected a pass during a 33–25 victory at the Washington Redskins. He was also inactive for the Eagles' Week 17 win against the Buffalo Bills.[60] Dawkins finished the season with 37 combined tackles (28 solo), six pass deflections, and an interception in ten games and ten starts.[15]

2008

Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starting free safety, alongside strong safety Quintin Mikell and cornerbacks Sheldon Brown and Asante Samuel.[61] In Week 5, he collected a season-high eight solo tackles and a sack during a 23-17 loss to the Washington Redskins. His sack on Redskins' quarterback Jason Campbell was the 20th sack of his career. He joined the 20/20 club after becoming the tenth player in NFL history to have 20 sacks and 20 interceptions in a career. His total at the time stood at 20 career sacks and 33 interceptions. He also broke fellow Jacksonville native and former Eagles' wide receiver Harold Carmichael's franchise record of 180 career games. He started in all 16 games in 2008 and recorded 75 combined tackles (64 solo), six pass deflections, three sacks, and an interception.[15]

External video
2008: Best of Brian Dawkins

He is also a member of the 30/30 club of players who have at least 30 interceptions and 30 forced fumbles. He and Charles Tillman are the only players to record at least 35 of each. (Forced fumbles have only been a recorded stat since 1991) He finished his career with the Eagles starting 182 of 183 games, recording 898 tackles, 34 interceptions, 32 forced fumbles, and 26 sacks.

Denver Broncos

2009

On February 28, 2009, the Denver Broncos signed Dawkins to a five-year, $17 million contract that included $7.2 million guaranteed. He joined another teammate, Correll Buckhalter, who also signed with the Broncos. The contract also included a termination clause that permitted Dawkins to opt out of the contract after two years and receive an extra $1.8 million, virtually making the contract for two years and $9 million. Dawkins could have also earned an additional $10 million in performance incentives.[62][63][64] The Philadelphia Eagles and Dawkins were discussing a possible two-year contract before Dawkins received interest from the Denver Broncos.

Brian Dawkins
Dawkins in 2009 with the Broncos

Head coach Josh McDaniels named Dawkins the starting free safety to begin the regular season, alongside strong safety Renaldo Hill and cornerbacks Champ Bailey and Andre Goodman.[65] In Week 10, he collected a season-high 14 combined tackles (12 solo) during a 27–17 loss at the Washington Redskins. On December 13, 2009, Dawkins made ten combined tackles, two pass deflections, and intercepted two pass attempts by quarterback Peyton Manning during the Broncos' 28–16 loss at the Indianapolis Colts in Week 14. On December 27, 2009, Dawkins recorded eight combined tackles in his return to Lincoln Financial Field during a 30–27 loss at the Philadelphia Eagles in Week 16.[66] On December 29, 2009, it was announced that Dawkins was selected to the 2008 Pro Bowl. He started all 16 games in 2009 and recorded 116 combined tackles (95 solo), 11 pass deflections, two interceptions, and a forced fumble.[15]

2010

On January 18, 2010, the Denver Broncos mutually parted ways with defensive coordinator Mike Nolan.[67] They promoted linebackers coach Don Martindale to defensive coordinator. Head coach Josh McDaniels elected to retain the starting secondary in 2009. Dawkins was sidelined for two games (Weeks 6–7) due to a knee injury. He further aggravated his knee injury and was inactive for another three games (Weeks 13–15).[68] On December 7, 2009, the Denver Broncos fired head coach Josh McDaniels after they fell to a 3-9 record.[69] In Week 16, he collected a season-high nine combined tackles and deflected a pass during a 24–23 win against the Houston Texans. He finished the season with 66 combined tackles (55 solo), five pass deflections, two sacks, and an interception in 11 games and 11 starts.[15]

2011

Head coach John Fox named Dawkins the starting strong safety to begin the regular season, alongside free safety Rahim Moore.[70] He started in the Denver Broncos' season-opener against the Oakland Raiders and collected a season-high nine combined tackles in their 23-20 loss. On October 23, 2011, Dawkins made five combined tackles and two sacks during an 18-15 win at the Miami Dolphins in Week 7. He was sidelined for a game in Week 15 and in Week 17 due to a reoccurring neck injury.[71] He finished the season with 51 combined tackles (38 solo), six pass deflections, three sacks, and a forced fumble in 14 games and 12 starts.[15] On January 19, 2012, it was announced that Dawkins would play in the 2012 Pro Bowl as a late injury replacement for Pittsburgh Steelers' safety Troy Polamalu.[72]

Retirement

After calling Coach John Fox on April 23, 2012, Dawkins announced via Twitter that he was retiring from the NFL. His reasoning was he wanted to retire while he was still healthy. He planned to stay in Colorado, and wanted to begin coaching high school football that fall.[73][74]

On April 28, 2012, Dawkins alongside Jeffrey Lurie announced that he would sign a one-day contract, and retire as a Philadelphia Eagle.[75] The Eagles retired Dawkins' number 20 in a ceremony at halftime of their September 30 game against the New York Giants. The Eagles have retired only 9 players' jerseys in franchise history, which goes back more than 80 years.[76]

Hall of Fame

On February 4, 2018, it was announced that Dawkins was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and was one of five players selected. Dawkins joined Randy Moss, Brian Urlacher, Ray Lewis, and former Eagles' teammate Terrell Owens.[77]

External video
Brian Dawkins' Hall of Fame speech
Brian Dawkins' Hall of Fame celebration

On August 4, 2018, Dawkins was officially inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and attended the ceremony at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

Legacy

Over the span of his career, Dawkins developed a reputation as a ball-hawking safety and became the unquestioned leader of the Philadelphia Eagles' defense.[78] He earned the nickname "Weapon X," a codename of Marvel character Wolverine,[73] the comic book superhero known for relentless aggression. He emerged as one of the top safeties in the league and was a defensive captain for the majority for both the Philadelphia Eagles and Denver Broncos.[79] Dawkins is considered to be one of the top safeties in NFL history and was ranked as the fifth best safety in NFL history by NFL analyst Gil Brandt.[80]

External video
NFL Legends: Dawkins' career highlights

As a captain and unquestioned leader, Dawkins has acted as a mentor to multiple players early in their career, including Al Harris, Chris Harris Jr., Jason Avant, and Quintin Mikell.[81][82] Chris Harris Jr. credits Dawkins and Champ Bailey for urging the Denver Broncos' coaching staff to play him as an undrafted rookie after he showed promise and performed well in practice squad.[83]

Post-playing career

On September 5, 2012, it was announced that Dawkins was hired as a NFL studio analyst by ESPN.[84]

On July 30, 2016, Dawkins returned to the Eagles to take a role on the team's scouting staff. On August 17, 2016, Dawkins was given the new role of Football Operations Executive to assist with player development.[85]

On May 22, 2018 Dawkins resigned as Football Operations Executive to seek other opportunities.[86]

Career statistics

Year Team Games Tackles Interceptions Fumbles
G GS Comb Total Ast Sacks Int Yards Avg Long TD PD FF FR
1996 PHI 14 13 74 53 21 1.0 3 41 13.7 30 0 0 0 2
1997 PHI 15 15 74 61 13 0.0 3 76 25.3 64 1 0 0 0
1998 PHI 14 14 56 45 11 1.0 2 39 19.5 30 0 0 1 0
1999 PHI 16 16 78 58 20 1.5 4 127 31.8 67 1 0 6 2
2000 PHI 13 13 71 54 17 2.0 4 62 15.5 32 0 0 1 2
2001 PHI 15 15 68 56 12 1.5 2 15 7.5 15 0 14 2 2
2002 PHI 16 16 91 62 29 3.0 2 27 13.5 27 0 9 5 4
2003 PHI 7 7 35 28 7 0.5 1 0 0.0 0 0 5 0 0
2004 PHI 15 15 69 61 8 3.0 4 40 10.0 32 0 8 2 1
2005 PHI 16 16 77 66 11 3.5 3 24 8.0 24 0 19 4 1
2006 PHI 16 16 93 71 22 1.0 4 38 9.5 38 0 9 5 0
2007 PHI 10 10 37 28 9 0.0 1 1 1.0 1 0 6 0 0
2008 PHI 16 16 75 64 11 3.0 1 25 25.0 25 0 6 6 1
2009 DEN 16 16 116 95 21 0.0 2 0 0.0 0 0 11 1 3
2010 DEN 11 11 66 55 11 2.0 1 -2 -2.0 -2 0 5 2 0
2011 DEN 14 12 51 38 13 3.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 6 1 0
Career 224 221 1,131 895 236 26.0 37 513 13.9 67 2 98 36 19

[87]

Personal life

Dawkins was born and raised in Jacksonville, Florida. In an interview, Dawkins talked about getting married: "I went to college at Clemson, and she (Connie) transferred there my second year, after one year at Jacksonville University. The night before going back to school our junior year, I asked her to marry me. Her grandfather gave us $100. $59 for my ring and $41 for hers–and we eloped. We went to the Justice of the Peace."[88]

He first saw his future wife, Connie Kerrin, in junior high school and began dating her while attending William M. Raines High School; she was a majorette while he played football and basketball. They graduated in 1992.[73][88] In early 2007, Dawkins and his wife had twin daughters, Chonni and Cionni.[89] Both daughters were born two months premature but are now both perfectly healthy. Dawkins, with his wife, Connie, also have two other children, Brian Jr. and Brionni.[90] Brian Jr. is currently playing for the Clemson Tigers as a cornerback.

After eloping in 1994, the couple had a wedding ceremony with family and friends at the Palm Beach Breakers Hotel in July 2009.[88]

While with the Eagles, Dawkins had been a resident of Voorhees Township, New Jersey, but put his house there up for sale after joining the Broncos.[91]

After Dawkins signed with the Broncos in 2009, Dan Leone, an Eagles employee who was a gate chief at Lincoln Financial Field was fired by the Eagles after Leone posted messages on his Facebook page expressing his disappointment in the team. Dawkins announced that he would give his two allotted game tickets for the 2009 Eagles-Broncos game to Leone, saying, "I felt it would be a good thing, to reach out to that individual and just let him know how much I appreciate it."[92]

Dawkins' nephew, Dalyn Dawkins, played running back for Purdue University and for Colorado State University and is currently a member of the Tennessee Titans.[93][94]

In 2014, Dawkins joined ESPN as an NFL analyst.

Achievements

  • 9× Pro Bowl (1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2011)
  • 5× First-team All-Pro (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2009) [95]
  • Second-team All-Pro (1999)
  • 20/20 Club
  • The first player in NFL history to record a sack, an interception, forced fumble, and touchdown reception in a single game
  • The first player in NFL history to record at least 30 interceptions and 30 forced fumbles in a career.
  • "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year (2008)
  • Philadelphia Eagles 75th Anniversary Team
  • NFL 2000s All-Decade Team
  • Philadelphia Eagles No. 20 retired
  • Has forced 36 fumbles, the most ever by a safety in NFL history[96]
  • Only player in NFL history with 25+ interceptions (37), forced fumbles (36) and sacks (26)
  • Pro Football Hall of Fame 2018 inductee
  • Super Bowl LII Champion (as executive)

References

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  3. ^ Dawkins, Kriese head Clemson Hall of Fame picks
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External links

1995 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team

The 1995 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors for their All-Atlantic Coast Conference ("ACC") teams for the 1995 college football season. Selectors in 1995 included the Associated Press (AP).

Four teams dominated the AP's 1995 All-ACC selections:

Conference champion Florida State finished the season ranked No. 4 in the final AP Poll and placed seven players on the first team: quarterback Danny Kanell, running back Warrick Dunn, wide receiver Andre Cooper, offensive tackle Jesus Hernandez, offensive guard Lewis Tyre, center Clay Shiver, and defensive lineman Reinard Wilson.

Virginia finished the season ranked No. 16 in the final AP Poll and placed six players on the first team: running back Tiki Barber, offensive tackle Jason Augustino, defensive backs Percy Ellsworth and Ronde Barber, placekicker Rafael Garcia, and punter Will Brice.

Clemson finished in third place in the conference and placed four players on the first team: offensive guard Will Young, linebacker Anthony Simmons, defensive back Brian Dawkins, and defensive lineman Lamarick Simpson.

Fifth-place North Carolina also placed four players on the first team: tight end Freddie Jones, linebacker Kivuusama Mays, defensive linemen Marcus Jones and Greg Ellis.

1996 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1996 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 64th in the National Football League (NFL). The team matched their previous output of 10–6 and qualifying for the playoffs.

After a season ending injury to Rodney Peete, Ty Detmer took over the starting role. For the second time in three seasons, the Eagles were 7–2 at the nine-game mark, thanks to a thrilling win November 3 on the road against Dallas. The capper to that contest was a combined 104-yard interception return between James Willis and Troy Vincent in the final moments which turned a potential game-winning drive by the Cowboys into a Philadelphia victory.

As in 1994 under Rich Kotite, the Eagles wilted. This time four losses in five games, including an embarrassing 27-point setback on national TV at Indianapolis, had the club scrambling in the playoff picture. However, wins against the lowly Jets and Cardinals managed to right the ship, and a wild-card berth was the reward.

The 1996 season was also the first season the Eagles debuted the midnight green, white, and black look, with new helmet designs and the logo and endzone font as well.

1999 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1999 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 67th season in the National Football League, and the first under head coach Andy Reid. The team finished 5–11 and last place in the NFC East. The Eagles hired Andy Reid away from the Green Bay Packers to be their new head coach prior to the start of the season. In the 1999 NFL Draft, the team drafted quarterback Donovan McNabb with the second overall pick.

2003 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2003 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 71st in the league. They matched their previous season's record, going 12–4, however, they were again upset in the NFC Championship Game. The team made the playoffs for the fourth straight year, won its third straight NFC East division title, and had the NFC's top record for the second straight season.

After losing their final game in Veterans Stadium to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the 2002 NFC Championship Game, Philadelphia looked to turn the page with the opening of brand-new Lincoln Financial Field, but the stadium got an inauspicious start when the Eagles dropped their first two games there, including a season-opening loss to Tampa Bay. A crushing loss to the New England Patriots left the Eagles 0–2 and expected to compete for the Super Bowl, at a precarious 2–3, and it looked to be 2–4 before Brian Westbrook returned a punt for a touchdown to shock the New York Giants in the closing minutes of their Week 7 contest. The play turned the Eagles' season around and they won their next nine games, finishing with a 12–4 record. In the playoffs, the Eagles needed a miracle conversion on 4th and 26 to defeat the Green Bay Packers, but the magic had run out by the next week and the team dropped a 14–3 decision to the Carolina Panthers at Lincoln Financial Field in the NFC Championship Game.

A preseason holdout by running back Duce Staley resulted in a running back by committee situation by Staley, Westbrook, and Correll Buckhalter. The trio rushed for a combined 1,613 yards and 20 touchdowns and became known as "The Three-Headed Monster." The rushing attack, which also benefited from 355 rushing yard and three touchdowns by quarterback Donovan McNabb, carried the offense, which featured a weak receiving corps that did not record a touchdown until Week 9. There were calls early in the season to replace McNabb with backup A. J. Feeley, but McNabb would find his rhythm and enjoy a great season. The defense weathered early injuries to defensive backs Bobby Taylor and Brian Dawkins to eventually surrender the seventh-fewest points in the league. Cornerback Troy Vincent, in his final season as an Eagle, was elected to the Pro Bowl. The weakness in the defense would be in stopping the run, something the team struggled with even at the height of their nine-game winning streak.

2004 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2004 Philadelphia Eagles season was the 72nd season for the team in the National Football League (NFL). The Eagles had been one of the most successful teams in the league after the Andy Reid and Donovan McNabb era began in 1999, making it to the playoffs for four straight seasons and to the NFC Championship Game in 2001, 2002, and 2003. However, the team could not reach the Super Bowl, despite being favored in the final two NFC title games. In the offseason, this already championship-level team was reinforced on both sides of the ball by the free agent additions of wide receiver Terrell Owens, defensive end Jevon Kearse, and middle linebacker Jeremiah Trotter, their third

round draft pick in 1998.

The Eagles had far and away the best team in the NFC and proved that right from the start. Possessing a high-powered offense which featured McNabb, Owens, and Brian Westbrook, as well as a bruising defense led by Pro Bowlers Trotter, Brian Dawkins, Lito Sheppard, and Michael Lewis, they steamrolled opponents on the way to a 13–1 start to the season. After resting starters for the final two games, the 13–3 Eagles soared past the Minnesota Vikings and the Atlanta Falcons in the playoffs, earning a trip to Super Bowl XXXIX in Jacksonville against the defending champion New England Patriots. The game was hard fought, but the Eagles fell 24–21, ending their magical season one score short of the ultimate goal. This season was considered the franchise's most successful until their Super Bowl LII-winning 2017 season.

2005 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2005 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 73rd season in the National Football League, and the seventh under head coach Andy Reid. After making the playoffs every season since 2000 and winning the past four NFC East crowns, the Eagles failed to improve on their 13-3 record from 2004 and fell to six wins and ten losses, missing the playoffs for the first time since 1999. The main cause of this is due to Injuries and the contract disputes with Terrell Owens, as a result it cause chaos upon the Eagles' chances in their post-Super Bowl season. In the 2004 season, Philadelphia had swept its division rivals, but they became the first team to reverse that feat in its next season, going 0–6 against the NFC East in 2005.

After the Super Bowl, the future looked bright for the team, but the onset of the Owens controversy in the summer began to cloud that outlook. The Eagles got out to a 3–1 record, but there were signs of trouble from the start. Contract disputes with Owens and Brian Westbrook created ugly distractions, and the team was criticized for not replacing departed defensive linemen Derrick Burgess and Corey Simon. Around the middle of the season, the injuries began to take a devastating toll. Quarterback Donovan McNabb, running back Brian Westbrook, wide receiver Todd Pinkston, offensive tackle Tra Thomas, defensive lineman Jerome McDougle, center Hank Fraley, cornerback Lito Sheppard, and running back Correll Buckhalter were all at some point lost for the season. Moreover, kicker David Akers and punter Dirk Johnson also battled injuries and missed time during the year.

The Owens situation boiled to a head in early November, with the team essentially suspending the outspoken receiver for the rest of the season. The rash of injuries, meanwhile, revealed a disturbing lack of depth on the team, especially in the quarterback position and defensive line. The Eagles lost eight of their final ten games, led at quarterback by the athletic, but inept, Mike McMahon.

In the seven games he did play, Owens caught six touchdowns with 763 receiving yards. Rookie Reggie Brown showed promise after Owens' suspension, grabbing four touchdowns, as did rookie running back Ryan Moats, who had three late-season touchdowns. The team's two Pro Bowlers came from the defense – middle linebacker Jeremiah Trotter and safety Brian Dawkins. However, for the most part, the Eagles' pass defense suffered due to the poor pass rush.

2006 All-Pro Team

The 2006 All-Pro Team comprised the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers Association (PFWA), or The Sporting News All-Pro teams in 2006. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. The three teams are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2006, the PFWA and the publication Pro Football Weekly combined their All-Pro teams.

2006 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2006 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 74th season in the National Football League, and the eighth under head coach Andy Reid. the Eagles improved on their 6–10 record from 2005 and finishing 10–6, reclaiming the NFC East, and winning a playoff game at home. The season ended in a Divisional Round playoff loss to the New Orleans Saints, but was seen as a success in the face of the adversity of losing starting quarterback Donovan McNabb to injury in Week 11.

The Eagles won four of their first five games, but they underwent a mid-season downturn that left them 5–6 and without McNabb. Backup quarterback Jeff Garcia stepped in and running back Brian Westbrook stepped up as the season turned around for Philadelphia. The team came back from the dead in late-November to win their last five regular season games, surprisingly winning the NFC East division title after a three-game December road sweep of all of its division rivals. They beat the New York Giants 23–20 in a home playoff game before finally losing to the Saints.

McNabb started the season with MVP-caliber numbers before his November injury, while Garcia was efficient, running the "West Coast offense" perfectly and completing eleven touchdown passes with only two interceptions. Westbrook became the focal point of the team's offense after the loss of McNabb, and responded by rushing for 1,217 yards and racking up 699 receiving yards. Trade acquisition Donté Stallworth combined with second-year wideout Reggie Brown to catch 15 touchdown passes and amass 1,541 receiving yards. Meanwhile, the offensive line was a quiet strength of the team, featuring emerging star Shawn Andrews and a group that started all 16 games together. The offense managed to morph from a quick-strike team under McNabb to a methodical balanced attack under Garcia while finishing No. 2 in yards in the league.

The defense was much improved from the previous season. The early season pass rush was savage, and the team appeared to be on the way to a sacks record, but a season-ending injury to Jevon Kearse and attrition weakened the defensive line. During the team's mid-season slump, the run defense was porous, but an elevation in play, spearheaded by defensive leader and All-Pro Brian Dawkins, helped the team turnaround. Trent Cole had eight of the team's 40 sacks and Lito Sheppard and his six interceptions made the Pro Bowl. The defense snagged 19 picks, and returned four of them for touchdowns.

2009 All-Pro Team

The 2009 All-Pro Team consists of National Football League (NFL) players named to the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers Association (PFWA), and Sporting News All-Pro teams in the 2009 NFL season. The Associated Press and Sporting News named first and second-team selections. The AP team was selected by a national panel of 50 NFL writers. The Sporting News selection process consisted of a players poll, making it "The Players' All-Pro Team". The PFWA All-NFL team is based on a poll of its more than 300 members.

2009 Denver Broncos season

The 2009 Denver Broncos season was their 40th season in the NFL and 50th season overall. The Broncos started 6–0, but lost 8 of their next 10 games after coming off bye week. They matched their 8–8 regular season record from 2008 and missed the playoffs for the fourth straight season. The Broncos welcomed many new defensive players signed during free agency, including veteran Eagles safety Brian Dawkins. This was their first season without head coach Mike Shanahan since 1995, as he was fired on December 30, 2008. On January 12, 2009, Denver hired former New England Patriots' offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels as their new head coach. At the time of his hiring, McDaniels was the youngest head coach in any of the four major North American professional sports and the fifth-youngest NFL head coach ever, though less than a week later the Tampa Bay Buccaneers named the even-younger Raheem Morris as their head coach.

According to the 2012 Football Outsiders Almanac, the 2009 Broncos had the second-largest improvement in defensive efficiency from the previous season.

A Football Life

A Football Life is a documentary series of 111 episodes, developed by NFL Films and aired on NFL Network that documents the lives of select National Football League players, coaches, owners, and teams. Friends, teammates, family members and other players and coaches associated with the subjects are interviewed.

Dawkins

Dawkins is an English surname.

It may refer to:

Benjamin C. Dawkins, Jr. (1911–1984), US District Judge in Louisiana

Benjamin C. Dawkins, Sr. (1881–1966), US District Judge in Louisiana

Boyd Dawkins (full name Maynard Boyd Dawkins; 1917–1966) South Australian sheep breeder and politician

Brian Dawkins (born 1973), American football Safety for the Philadelphia Eagles and Denver Broncos

Cecil Dawkins (born 1927), North American author, also known for her personal correspondence with Flannery O'Connor

Sir Clinton Edward Dawkins (1859–1905), British businessman and civil servant

Dalyn Dawkins (born 1994), American football player

Darryl Dawkins (1957–2015), American basketball player and coach

Derek Dawkins (born 1959), English footballer

Dion Dawkins (born 1994), American football player

Egbert Nathaniel Dawkins III (b. 1979) a.k.a. Aloe Blacc, American soul singer and musician

Gookie Dawkins (born 1979), baseball player

James Dawkins (antiquarian) (1722, Jamaica – 6 September 1757, Sutton's Plantation, Jamaica) was a British antiquarian and Jacobite.

Jimmy Dawkins, (1936–2013) Chicago blues musician

John Sydney "Joe" Dawkins (born 1947), Australian politician, instigator of educational reforms known as the Dawkins Revolution

John Dawkins (b. 1954), Australian politician, member of South Australian Legislative Council

Johnny Dawkins (born 1963), American basketball player and coach

Marian Stamp Dawkins (born 1945), professor of animal behaviour at Oxford, ex-wife of Richard Dawkins

Marvin Dawkins a.k.a. MC Romeo (born 1980), British garage music MC and member of So Solid Crew

Paul Dawkins (born 1979), American basketball player

Peter Dawkins:

Peter Dawkins (FBRT) (b. 1945), writer and founder-director of the Francis Bacon Research Trust

Peter Dawkins (musician) (born 1946), New Zealand record producer and musician

Pete Dawkins (Peter Miller Dawkins, born 1938), former US Army Brigadier General and vice chairman of Citigroup Private Bank

Richard Dawkins (born 1941), ethologist, evolutionary biologist and noted atheist

Richard MacGillivray Dawkins (1871–1955), British archaeologist

Sean Dawkins (born 1971), American football player

William Boyd Dawkins (1837–1929), British geologist and archaeologist

Denver Broncos

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver, Colorado. The Broncos compete as a member club of the National Football League (NFL)'s American Football Conference (AFC) West division. They began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) and joined the NFL as part of the merger in 1970. The Broncos are owned by the Pat Bowlen trust and currently play home games at Broncos Stadium at Mile High (formerly known as Invesco Field at Mile High from 2001–2010 and Sports Authority Field at Mile High from 2011–2017). Prior to that, they played at Mile High Stadium from 1960 to 2000.

The Broncos were barely competitive during their 10-year run in the AFL and their first seven years in the NFL. They did not complete a winning season until 1973. In 1977, four years later, they qualified for the playoffs for the first time in franchise history and advanced to Super Bowl XII. Since 1975, the Broncos have become one of the NFL's most successful teams, having suffered only seven losing seasons. They have won eight AFC Championships (1977, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 1998, 2013, 2015), and three Super Bowl championships (1997 (XXXII), 1998 (XXXIII), 2015 (50)), and share the NFL record for most Super Bowl losses (5 — tied with the New England Patriots). They have nine players in the Pro Football Hall of Fame: John Elway, Floyd Little, Shannon Sharpe, Gary Zimmerman, Willie Brown, Tony Dorsett, Terrell Davis, Brian Dawkins, Champ Bailey.

Greg Jackson (American football)

Gregory Allen Jackson (born August 20, 1966) is an American football coach who is currently the Defensive backs coach for the Dallas Cowboys of the NFL (National Football League). Jackson is also a former player who played safety in the NFL for 12 seasons for the New York Giants, San Diego Chargers, Philadelphia Eagles, and New Orleans Saints. He was drafted by the New York Giants in the third round of the 1989 NFL Draft and played college football at LSU.

In 1994, he took over from Wes Hopkins as the starting free safety of the Philadelphia Eagles, and played there the following year,

till replaced by rookie Brian Dawkins.Jackson was hired as assistant secondary coach by the San Francisco 49ers on February 17, 2011. After Jim Harbaugh left the 49ers to coach at the University of Michigan, he brought Jackson with him to serve as the secondary coach.

In 2016, Jackson returned to the NFL when he was hired to be the safeties coach for the Dallas Cowboys.

Jeremiah Trotter

Jeremiah Trotter (born January 20, 1977) is a former American football linebacker who played in the National Football League (NFL) for twelve seasons. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the third round of the 1998 NFL Draft. He played college football at Stephen F. Austin State University.

Trotter is one of just four linebackers in Eagles history to earn four or more Pro Bowl invitations, joining Chuck Bednarik, Maxie Baughan and Bill Bergey in that select group. Trotter has also been a member of the Washington Redskins and Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Legacy (Eminem song)

"Legacy" is a song by American hip hop recording artist Eminem. It is the sixth track on his eighth studio album The Marshall Mathers LP 2 (2013). The song discusses Eminem's dysfunctional childhood. The song was produced by American record producer Emile Haynie and written by Eminem, Polina Goudieva, David Brook, and Emile Haynie. The song features additional vocals from Russian singer-songwriter Polina. "Legacy" was met with generally positive reviews from music critics upon the album's release. The song has since peaked at number 44 on the US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs. "Legacy" became one of the official theme songs of WrestleMania XXX.

Philadelphia Eagles

The Philadelphia Eagles are a professional American football team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Eagles compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In the 2017 season the team won Super Bowl LII, their first Super Bowl win in franchise history and their fourth NFL title overall, after winning the Championship Game in 1948, 1949, and 1960.

The franchise was established in 1933 as a replacement for the bankrupt Frankford Yellow Jackets, when a group led by Bert Bell secured the rights to an NFL franchise in Philadelphia. Bell, Chuck Bednarik, Bob Brown, Brian Dawkins, Reggie White, Steve Van Buren, Tommy McDonald, Greasy Neale, Pete Pihos, Sonny Jurgensen, Terrell Owens, and Norm Van Brocklin have been inducted to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The team has an intense rivalry with the New York Giants. This rivalry is the oldest in the NFC East and is among the oldest in the NFL. It was ranked by NFL Network as the number one rivalry of all-time and Sports Illustrated ranks it amongst the Top 10 NFL rivalries of all-time at number four, and according to ESPN, it is one of the fiercest and most well-known rivalries in the American football community. They also have a bitter rivalry with the Dallas Cowboys, which has become more high-profile since the 1960s, as well as a historic rivalry with the Washington Redskins. Their rivalry with the Pittsburgh Steelers is another bitter rivalry known as the battle of Pennsylvania, roughly dating back to 1933, that mostly arises from the two teams' statuses as being from opposite ends of the same state.The team consistently ranks among the best in the league in attendance and has sold out every game since the 1999 season. In a Sports Illustrated poll of 321 NFL players, Eagles fans were selected the most intimidating fans in the NFL.

Phillies Nation TV

Phillies Nation TV is an American television sports show focusing on the Philadelphia Phillies. The weekly broadcast features two hosts, Pat Gallen and Corey Seidman, discussing current Phillies topics. The two are joined by co-hosts Natalie Egenolf and Ryann Williams, who present reader questions. Correspondents Ian Riccaboni and Jay Floyd interview current and former Phillies players and prospects, highlight charity events run associated with the Phillies, and interview notable Phillies fans, such as former wrestler The Blue Meanie and cheese steak mogul Tony Luke.

The show began its original run on Service Electric in 2012. For the 2013 season, Phillies Nation TV began airing first run episodes on Comcast Network and re-runs on Comcast SportsNet in addition to airing on Service Electric. The 2013 season featured an emphasis on features and interviews as the show featured baseball-related interviews with Marc Summers, Artie Lange, and Brian Dawkins.For the show's third season, former Phillies' pitcher Tommy Greene provided pitching tips while former Phillies outfielder Matt Stairs provided hitting tips throughout each episode. The 2014 season also featured a four-part interview with former Phillies' pitcher Curt Simmons.Phillies Nation TV also produces exclusive web content for CSNPhilly.com.

Super Bowl XXXIX

Super Bowl XXXIX was an American football game played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Philadelphia Eagles to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2004 season. The Patriots defeated the Eagles by the score of 24–21. The game was played on February 6, 2005, at Alltel Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida, the first time the Super Bowl was played in that city.

The Patriots, who entered the Super Bowl after compiling a 14–2 regular season record, became the most recent team to win consecutive Super Bowls (As of 2019). New England also became the second team after the Dallas Cowboys to win three Super Bowls in four years. The Eagles were making their second Super Bowl appearance after posting a 13–3 regular season record.

The game was close throughout, with the teams battling to a 14–14 tie by the end of the third quarter. The Patriots then scored 10 points in the 4th quarter with Corey Dillon's 2-yard touchdown run and Adam Vinatieri's 22-yard field goal. The Eagles then cut their deficit to 24–21, with quarterback Donovan McNabb's 30-yard touchdown pass to receiver Greg Lewis, with 1:48 remaining in the game but could not sustain the comeback. Overall, New England forced four turnovers, while Patriots wide receiver Deion Branch was named Super Bowl MVP for recording 133 receiving yards and tied the Super Bowl record with 11 catches.To avoid the possibility of an incident similar to the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show during the previous year, the league selected Paul McCartney as a "safe" choice to perform during Super Bowl XXXIX's halftime. The broadcast of the game on Fox was watched by an estimated 86 million viewers.

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