Brian Cabral

Kealilhaaheo Brian David Cabral (born June 23, 1956) is an American football coach and former player. He stood in as the interim head football coach for three games at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2010. Cabral played professionally as a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) with the Atlanta Falcons, the Green Bay Packers, and the Chicago Bears. He won a Super Bowl as a member of the 1985 Chicago Bears.

Brian Cabral
Current position
TitleAssistant head coach, defensive coordinator, linebackers coach
TeamIndiana State
ConferenceMVFC
Biographical details
BornJune 23, 1956 (age 62)
Fort Benning, Georgia
Playing career
1974–1977Colorado
1978*Atlanta Falcons
1979Atlanta Falcons
1980Green Bay Packers
1981–1986Chicago Bears
  • Inactive and/or offseason member only
Position(s)Linebacker
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1987–1988Purdue (ILB)
1989Colorado (GA)
1990–2010Colorado (ILB)
2010Colorado (interim HC)
2010–2012Colorado (ILB)
2013–presentIndiana State (AHC/DC/LB)
Head coaching record
Overall2–1
Bowls0–0

College playing career

Cabral lettered three seasons for Colorado at linebacker from 1975 to 1977 under Coach Bill Mallory, as he was a captain and played a big role on The Buffaloes' Big Eight champion team in 1976. He led Colorado with 13 tackles (12 solo) in the 1977 Orange Bowl against Ohio State. As a senior, he was honored as the Big Eight Conference's player of the week for a monster 25 tackles in a CU 27-21 win over Stanford and shared the team's Sure Tackler Award with Mark Haynes. That 25-tackle game included 13 solo stops and is still tied for the fourth most in a single game in Colorado team history.[1]

NFL career

Cabral was a nine-year National Football League veteran, being drafted by the Atlanta Falcons in the fourth round of the 1978 NFL Draft. He played two seasons with Atlanta, one with Green Bay and six with Chicago. As the captain of the Bears' special teams, he was a member of Chicago's Super Bowl XX championship team in 1985.[1]

Coaching career

Following his NFL career, Cabral became the inside linebackers coach at Purdue for two seasons. In 1989, Cabral came back to Colorado and tutored the inside linebackers his first year as a graduate assistant. Cabral assumed full-time duties in the same capacity in 1990, and would remain in that capacity for two decades under Bill McCartney, Rick Neuheisel, Gary Barnett, Dan Hawkins and Jon Embree. From 1999 through 2005, he also coached the punt return unit on special teams, and served as the director of Colorado's summer football camps from 1995 through 2005 and for a brief time as recruiting coordinator.

Known as one of the top linebacker coaches in the nation, his students have included Matt Russell, the 1996 Butkus Award winner, all-Big Eight performers Greg Biekert, Chad Brown and Ted Johnson, all of whom went on to stardom in the National Football League, and all-Big 12 linebacker Jordon Dizon, a consensus All-American who was also the league defensive player of the year for 2007. He also recruited tailback Rashaan Salaam, the 1994 Heisman trophy winner, and Chris Naeole, a 1996 All-American guard.

Hawkins promoted him to assistant head coach on February 7, 2008. Hawkins cited his leadership, noting that "no one person has had more influence in the success of Colorado football than Brian Cabral."

Cabral's 21 years as a full-time assistant rank as the most in Colorado athletic history, not only for football but for all sports sponsored by the University.

Cabral has served twice as interim head coach for the Buffaloes. His first stint was a three-month period in 2004 before the start of the season when Head Coach Gary Barnett was placed on paid administrative leave. In that role, he continued to coach his position players but also took care of day-to-day operational details of the program.[1] On November 9, 2010, Cabral was again named interim head coach when Dan Hawkins was fired.[2] He won his initial game as interim head coach against Iowa State after Hawkins firing, with Hawkins' son having his best game of the season.

In 2013, Cabral became associate head coach and defensive coordinator at Indiana State.[3]

Personal life

Cabral grew up in Kailua, Hawaii and remains involved in recruiting efforts in Hawaii for the Buffaloes. Cabral has worked youth camps in the state as well as all-Polynesian camps in the continental U.S. He is a founding board member of the Polynesian Coaches Association.

Cabral earned a B.S. degree in therapeutic recreation from Colorado in 1978.[1]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Colorado Buffaloes (Big 12 Conference) (2010)
2010 Colorado 2–1 2–1 5th (North)
Colorado: 2–1 2–1 Named interim head coach on November 9
Total: 2–1

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Brian Cabral, Associate Head Coach/Linebackers". CUBuffs.com. Archived from the original on April 5, 2013.
  2. ^ "Colorado fires Dan Hawkins". ESPN.com. November 9, 2010. Retrieved November 9, 2010.
  3. ^ "Brian Cabral". Indiana State. Retrieved July 19, 2016.

External links

1977 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 1977 Colorado Buffaloes football team represented the University of Colorado Boulder in the Big Eight Conference during the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. Led by fourth-year head coach Bill Mallory, the Buffaloes were 7–3–1 overall and 3–3–1 in the Big 8.

Colorado was a defending conference co-champion and won its first five games to reach third in the polls in October, its highest rank in five years. A disappointing 2–3–1 finish knocked them out of a bowl berth.

1979 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1979 Atlanta Falcons season was the Falcons' 14th season. The Falcons were trying to improve upon their 9–7 record in 1978 and make it to the playoffs for the second time in team history, their first appearance being the year before. Rookie fullback William Andrews rushed for 167 yards in a 40–34 overtime win over the Saints in the season opener in New Orleans. Andrews set a club record with 1,023 yards, while quarterback Steve Bartkowski became the first Falcon to surpass the 2,000-yard mark with 2,505. However, the Falcons' defense allowed 388 points in a 6–10 start.

1980 Green Bay Packers season

The 1980 Green Bay Packers season was their 62nd season overall and their 60th in the National Football League. The club posted a 5–10–1 record under coach Bart Starr, earning them a fifth-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1982 Chicago Bears season

The 1982 Chicago Bears season was their 63rd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–6 record under first year head coach Mike Ditka in a strike shortened season.

The strike also prevented the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league.

1985 Chicago Bears season

The 1985 Chicago Bears season was their 66th regular season and 16th post-season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears entered 1985 looking to improve on their 10–6 record from 1984 and advance further than the NFC Championship Game, where they lost to the 15–1 San Francisco 49ers. Not only did the Bears improve on that record, they put together one of the greatest seasons in NFL history.

The Bears won fifteen games, as the 49ers had the year before, and won their first twelve before losing. The Bears' defense was ranked first in the league and only allowed 198 total points (an average of 12.4 points per game). The Bears won the NFC Central Division by seven games over the second place Green Bay Packers and earned the NFC's top seed and home field advantage throughout the playoffs at Soldier Field. In their two playoff games against the New York Giants and Los Angeles Rams, the Bears outscored their opponents 45–0 and became the first team to record back-to-back playoff shutouts. Then, in Super Bowl XX in New Orleans against the New England Patriots, the Bears set several more records. First, their 46 points broke the record that had been set by the Los Angeles Raiders in 1984 with 38 and tied by the 49ers the following year. Their 36-point margin of victory topped the 29-point margin of victory that the Raiders had put up in Super Bowl XVIII and stood as a record until the 49ers won Super Bowl XXIV, also in New Orleans, by 45 points over the Denver Broncos. It was the Bears' first NFL World Championship title since 1963.

The 1985 Chicago Bears are one of the few teams to consistently challenge the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins for the unofficial title of the greatest NFL team of all time. In 2007, the 1985 Bears were ranked as the second greatest Super Bowl championship team on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions, ranking behind the 1972 Dolphins. Other sources rate the 1985 Chicago Bears as the greatest NFL team ever.

2004 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 2004 Colorado Buffaloes football team represented the University of Colorado at Boulder in the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team played their home games in Folsom Field in Boulder, Colorado. They participated in the Big 12 Conference in the North Division. They were coached by head coach Gary Barnett.

2010 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 2010 Colorado Buffaloes football team represented the University of Colorado in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by fifth-year head coach Dan Hawkins for the first nine games and interim head coach Brian Cabral for the final three games. Colorado played their homes game at Folsom Field. It was also the final season as members the Big 12 Conference in the North Division for Colorado, before joining the Pac-12 Conference for the 2011 season. The Buffaloes failed to qualify for a bowl game, as they finished the season 5–7, 2–6 in Big 12 play.

2013 Indiana State Sycamores football team

The 2013 Indiana State Sycamores football team represented Indiana State University in the 2013 NCAA Division I FCS football season. They were led by first year head coach Mike Sanford and played their home games at Memorial Stadium. They were a member of the Missouri Valley Football Conference. They finished the season 1–11, 0–8 in MVFC play to finish in last place.

Bill Mallory

William Guy Mallory (May 30, 1935 – May 25, 2018) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Miami University (1969–1973), the University of Colorado at Boulder (1974–1978), Northern Illinois University (1980–1983), and Indiana University (1984–1996), compiling a career college football record of 168–129–4.

Bill Saunders

William Hardin "Navy Bill" Saunders (June 20, 1898 – March 13, 1950) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Colorado State Teachers College—now the University of Northern Colorado—from 1928 to 1931, at the University of Colorado at Boulder from 1932 to 1934, and at the University of Denver from 1936 to 1938, compiling a career college football record of 44–28–8. Saunders played football as a lineman at the United States Naval Academy and was later a line coach at the Agricultural College of Colorado, now Colorado State University. He died on March 13, 1950, at his plantation home in Grenada, Mississippi.

Dan Hawkins

Danny Clarence Hawkins (born November 10, 1960) is an American former football player, coach, and sportscaster. He served as the head football coach at Willamette University (1993–1997), Boise State University (2001–2005), and the University of Colorado (2006–2010), compiling a career college football record of 112–61–1. Hawkins was the head coach of the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League (CFL) for five games in 2013 before he was fired mid-season. Between 2011 and 2016, he served as a college football analyst for ESPN. He has served as head coach for UC Davis since the beginning of the 2017 season.

Dave Cropp

David Bertram Cropp (July 8, 1876 – ?) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1903 and 1904, compiling a record of 14–4–1. Cropp was also the head baseball coach at Colorado in 1904 and 1905, tallying a mark of 9–9. He attended Lenox College and the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Frank Potts

Frank C. Potts (January 15, 1903 – May 28, 1990) was an American pole vaulter and coach of American football, cross country, and track. He served as the head cross country and track coach at of the University of Colorado at Boulder from 1927 to 1968. Potts also coached the Colorado Buffaloes football team in 1940, 1944, and 1945, compiling a record of 16–8–1.

Harry Heller

Harry C. Heller was an American football coach. He served as the first head football coach at the University of Colorado at Boulder, coaching one season in 1894 and compiling a record of 8–1. Heller attended Baker University and graduated from the University of Colorado in 1885.

James J. Yeager

James J. "Gentleman Jim" Yeager (c. 1908 – May 17, 1971) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Fort Hays State University (1935), Iowa State University (1937–1940), and the University of Colorado at Boulder (1941–1943, 1946–1947), compiling a career college football record of 48–38–3. Yeager won conference championships in 1935 with Fort Hays State and in 1942 and 1943 with Colorado.

Kurt Roper

Kurt Roper (born July 25, 1972) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the quarterbacks coach at North Carolina State University. Roper was the interim head football coach at University of Colorado Boulder for the final game of the 2018 season. He previously served as the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at the University of South Carolina for two seasons. He also served as the offensive coordinator at the University of Florida in 2014 and Duke University for six seasons prior to that. A native of Ames, Iowa, Roper earned three varsity letters as a quarterback and defensive back at Rice before graduating in 1995. He earned a master's degree from the University of Tennessee in 1998. His coaching career has been much associated with that of David Cutcliffe.

Line integral convolution

In scientific visualization, line integral convolution (LIC) is a technique to visualize a vector field, like a fluid motion, such as the wind movement in a tornado. LIC has been proposed by Brian Cabral and Leith Leedom. Compared to other integration-based techniques that compute field lines of the input vector field, LIC has the advantage that all structural features of the vector field are displayed, without the need to adapt the start and end points of field lines to the specific vector field. LIC is a method from the texture advection family.

Mel Tucker

Melvin Tucker (born January 4, 1972) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the head football coach at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Tucker was the interim head coach for the Jacksonville Jaguars of the National Football League (NFL) for five games in 2011. He has worked as the defensive backs coach at the University of Alabama and as the defensive coordinator for both the Chicago Bears of the NFL as well as the University of Georgia.

Theron W. Mortimer

Theron Winifred "T. C." Mortimer (May 27, 1872 – October 1, 1952) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He served as the head football coach at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1900 and at Alma College in 1901, compiling a career college football record of 9–6. Mortimer was also the head baseball coach at Colorado in 1900, tallying a mark of 4–2. Mortimer graduated from Simpson College in 1896 and played football as a tackle at the University of Chicago from 1896 to 1899.

Brian Cabral—championships, awards, and honors

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