Bret Saberhagen

Bret William Saberhagen (/ˈseɪbərheɪɡɪn/; born April 11, 1964) is an American former professional baseball right-handed starting pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Kansas City Royals, New York Mets, Colorado Rockies, and Boston Red Sox from 1984 through 1999, and a comeback in 2001.

Saberhagen is a three-time All-Star, a two-time Cy Young Award winner, and a Gold Glove Award winner. He led MLB in wins and earned run average in 1989, and threw a no-hitter in 1991.

Bret Saberhagen
Bret Saberhagen (4764163) (cropped)
Saberhagen at Camp Buehring in 2018
Pitcher
Born: April 11, 1964 (age 54)
Chicago Heights, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 4, 1984, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
August 7, 2001, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record167–117
Earned run average3.34
Strikeouts1,715
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early years

Saberhagen was born in Chicago Heights, Illinois. His parents, Linda and Bob, divorced when he was five years old.[1] He attended Grover Cleveland High School, located in Reseda, California. Saberhagen starred in both basketball and baseball. In 1982, during his senior year, he pitched a no-hitter and was the winning pitcher in the Los Angeles City Championship game, played at Dodger Stadium.[2] He also played football in high school.[3]

Career

Saberhagen was drafted out of high school by the Kansas City Royals in the 19th round of the 1982 Major League Baseball draft and made his major league debut at the age of 19 on April 4, 1984. He made an immediate impact, compiling a 10–11 record and a 3.48 ERA. The Royals made the postseason but lost to the Detroit Tigers. Saberhagen pitched well in his first postseason start, giving up two runs in eight innings.

In 1985, the 21-year-old Saberhagen established himself as the ace of the staff. He went 20–6 with a 2.87 ERA and won the American League Cy Young Award. He led the Royals to a World Series championship and was named MVP of the World Series, pitching two complete games, including a shutout in Game 7. He was also the subject of much media attention during the Series as his wife gave birth to his first son, Drew William, on the same night of the infamous Don Denkinger call.

Saberhagen developed an odd pattern of successful seasons in odd-numbered years (1985, 1987, 1989, 1991) and poor performances in even-numbered years. In 1986, he was 7–12 with a 4.12 ERA. In 1987, another odd-numbered year, Saberhagen had an excellent year, going 18–10 with a 3.36 ERA. That record, however, was disappointing because Saberhagen had entered the All-Star break with a 15–3 record and another Cy Young Award seemingly in the bag. He pitched in the 1987 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, but he suffered a shoulder injury that hampered his second-half performance.

In 1988, the pattern continued as Saberhagen went 14–16 for the Royals with a 3.80 ERA, the second most losses in the American League. The following year, 1989, he brought back his old brilliance by compiling a record of 23–6 with a 2.16 ERA, leading both leagues with 12 complete games, and finishing third in strikeouts. Before his July 26, 1989 start against the Boston Red Sox, Saberhagen had a record of 9–5. Over the next two months, he compiled a record of 14–1 with four shutouts. Only once in a game over that period did a team score more than two runs. He also led the league in innings pitched, complete games, and strikeout to walk ratio. For his efforts, Saberhagen won his second Cy Young Award as the American League's best pitcher.

Despite a 5–7 record, Saberhagen was selected to the 1990 American League All-Star team, primarily due to his 1989 performance. He rewarded the selection by being the winning pitcher in the 2–0 American League triumph. Saberhagen pitched only one game after the all-star break before being shelved for most of the rest of 1990 with an injury.

In 1991, Saberhagen went 13–8 with a 3.07 ERA. On August 26, he no-hit the Chicago White Sox 7-0 at Royals Stadium; to date, the no-hitter is the last thrown by a Royal.[4]

On December 11, 1991, Saberhagen was traded along with Bill Pecota to the New York Mets in exchange for Kevin McReynolds, Gregg Jefferies, and Keith Miller.

He won 14 games for the New York Mets in the strike-shortened 1994 season and won 15 games for the Boston Red Sox in 1998. Also in 1994, he had more wins than walks. No other pitcher (as of 2005) pitching more than 150 innings had accomplished this feat since 1919.[5] His stint with the Mets was not without controversy; on July 27, 1993, Saberhagen sprayed bleach into a group of reporters. After admitting his role in this incident, Saberhagen donated one day's pay to charity and apologized to fans and the media.[6]

Saberhagen appeared as himself in the 1994 Brendan Fraser movie The Scout. In the movie, he is hired by former New York Yankees scout AL Percolo (Albert Brooks) to pitch to Al's phenom prospect Steve Nebraska (Brendan Fraser).

In 1995, he joined the Colorado Rockies as a much-heralded ace. While the Rockies made the playoffs as the National League Wild Card team, Saberhagen lost his only start, Game 4 of the NLDS when the Rockies were eliminated by the Braves on their way to a World Series win.

Saberhagen didn't pitch at all in 1996 due to injury but attempted a comeback with the Boston Red Sox and went 15-8 and 10-6 in 1998 and 1999. He also won the Sporting News Comeback Player of the Year Award in 1998, and the Tony Conigliaro Award.

After missing the entire 2000 season, Saberhagen attempted a comeback in 2001 but pitched in only three games. He retired at the end of the season.

Post-playing career

In 2005, he was inducted into the Kansas City Royals Hall of Fame.

Saberhagen was eligible for the 2007 ballot for the Baseball Hall of Fame. He stated if he were voted in, he would not attend the ceremony because he believes Pete Rose should be inducted. Saberhagen finished with 7 votes and was not eligible for next year's ballot.

He was a guest on an episode of Married... with Children.

In 2006, he began coaching the Calabasas High School Coyotes Varsity baseball team, in Calabasas, California. He was a primary contributor to the building of a first-class baseball field for the Varsity team there. His younger son Dalton played on the Freshman team at that time and Saberhagen's goal was to coach his son when he moved up to Varsity. However, a constant set of battles with the Las Virgines Unified School District administration—among other reasons—caused him to resign his coaching duties in October 2007. Before the 2008 season, Saberhagen returned as the head coach of the Calabasas varsity team. He currently resides in Thousand Oaks, California.

In October 2017, Saberhagen was evacuated from a Napa hotel due to the Tubbs Fire after attending a charity golf event.[7]

Personal life

Saberhagen's married his high school sweetheart, Janeane Inglett, in 1984. That marriage and a second marriage ended in divorce.[8]

Saberhagen's son, Drew William, played college baseball for the Western Carolina Catamounts and the Pepperdine Waves.[9]

On February 9, 2019, Saberhagen married Kandace DeAngelo, the president and CEO of The Premier Stem Cell Institute and a Colorado State University graduate.[10]

Bret Saberhagen's Hit & Fun

Bret Saberhagen at one time opened and operated a sports entertainment facility featuring Major League-caliber indoor batting cages, pitching mounds, bowling, laser tag, and arcade games. The 30,000-square-foot (2,800 m2) sports center was located at 580 Montauk Highway in West Babylon, New York, near Saberhagen's Babylon, New York, estate. The facility's façade was shaped like Ebbets Field, the home of the Brooklyn Dodgers, and designed by Steven Ray Fellman of Amityville, New York.

See also

References

  1. ^ Frey, Jennifer (27 February 1994). "BASEBALL; The Joke's Up for Bret Saberhagen". The New York Times. Retrieved 3 January 2018.
  2. ^ "Still Bringing Heat". CNN. April 2, 2007. Archived from the original on June 4, 2009. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  3. ^ Martinez, Michael (17 February 1986). "Saberhagen in His Glory". The New York Times. Retrieved 3 January 2018.
  4. ^ "Sports American League (Baseball) Baseball AL West Division Major League Baseball – SI Vault". Vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved March 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "'Professor Radke' leads by example – MLB – ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. June 17, 2005. Retrieved March 13, 2009.
  6. ^ Frey, Jennifer (August 11, 1993). "BASEBALL; Saberhagen Belatedly Admits to Bleach Squirt – The". New York Times. Retrieved March 13, 2009.
  7. ^ "Barry Bonds among athletes who flee "crazy" Wine Country fire scene". SFGate. Retrieved 2017-10-10.
  8. ^ Cohen, Alan. "Bret Saberhagen". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  9. ^ Brewster, Ben (February 16, 2012). "Stinger opener to feature pitching great Saberhagen". West Central Tribune. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  10. ^ "Bret Saberhagen on Instagram: "The Perfect Blend began 2/16/2019 when I married the love of my life. We chose to spend the rest of our lives together and there is not a…"". Instagram. Retrieved February 20, 2019.

External links

Preceded by
Wilson Álvarez
No-hitter pitcher
August 26, 1991
Succeeded by
Kent Mercker, Mark Wohlers & Alejandro Peña
1985 Kansas City Royals season

The 1985 Kansas City Royals season ended with the Royals' first world championship win over their intrastate rivals, the St. Louis Cardinals. The Royals won the Western Division of the American League for the second consecutive season and the sixth time in ten years. The team improved its record to 91–71 on the strength of its pitching, led by Bret Saberhagen's Cy Young Award-winning performance.

In the playoffs, the Royals went on to win the American League Championship Series for just the second time and the World Series for the first time (they previously lost the 1980 World Series). Both the ALCS and the World Series were won in seven games after the Royals lost the first two games at home and three of the first four games overall. The championship series against the Cardinals was forever remembered in St. Louis by umpires' supposedly blown calls in Game Six: one that cost the Royals a run in the 4th, and a blown call by umpire Don Denkinger that allowed Jorge Orta to reach first. The World Series is remembered in Kansas City as the culmination of ten years of dominance by the Royals, during which they reached the playoffs seven times, with stars such as George Brett, Hal McRae and Willie Wilson.

The team was managed by Dick Howser in his fourth and final full season with the Royals.

The Royals did not return to the postseason until 2014 and won the World Series again in 2015.

1985 Major League Baseball season

The 1985 Major League Baseball season ended with the Kansas City Royals defeating the St. Louis Cardinals in the seventh game of the I-70 World Series. Bret Saberhagen, the regular season Cy Young Award winner, was named MVP of the Series. The National League won the All-Star Game for the second straight year.

The League Championship Series playoffs were expanded to a best-of-seven format beginning this year, and both leagues ended up settling their pennant winners in more than five games, with the Royals beating the Toronto Blue Jays in seven games, and the Cardinals beating the Los Angeles Dodgers in six games.

1987 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1987 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 58th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1987, at the Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, California, the home of the Oakland Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 2-0 in 13 innings. Montreal Expos outfielder Tim Raines was named the Most Valuable Player.

1989 Kansas City Royals season

The 1989 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing second in the American League West with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses. The Royals' record was tied for the third best in baseball, but in the pre-wild card era, the team did not qualify for the post-season.

1989 Major League Baseball season

The 1989 Major League Baseball season saw the Oakland Athletics win their first World Series title since 1974.

1990 Kansas City Royals season

The 1990 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 6th in the American League West with a record of 75 wins and 86 losses.

1995 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 1995 season was the 34th regular season for the Mets. They went 69-75 and finished 2nd in the NL East. They were managed by Dallas Green. They played home games at Shea Stadium.

1997 Boston Red Sox season

The 1997 Boston Red Sox season was the 97th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League East with a record of 78 wins and 84 losses, 20 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. It was the last time the Red Sox had a losing record until 2012. The Red Sox had 5,781 at bats, a single season major league record.

1998 Boston Red Sox season

The 1998 Boston Red Sox season was the 98th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses, 22 games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, but lost to the American League Central champion Cleveland Indians in the ALDS.

Bill Pecota

William Joseph "Bill" Pecota (born February 16, 1960) is a former professional baseball player who played infield in the Major Leagues from 1986-94. Pecota attended Peterson High School in Sunnyvale, California. He was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in the 10th round of 1981 MLB amateur draft after playing at De Anza College in Cupertino, California, and debuted in Kansas City in 1986. Pecota's best season came in 1991, his final year in Kansas City, as he hit .286 and played a career-high 125 games. After the 1991 season, Pecota, along with Bret Saberhagen, was traded to the New York Mets for Kevin McReynolds, Gregg Jefferies and Keith Miller. After one season in New York, Pecota signed as a free agent with the Atlanta Braves, with whom he played the final two seasons of his career. Pecota earned approximately $2.6 million as a player. He was nicknamed I-29 Pecota by his teammates for being frequently sent to the Royals AAA Minor League team in Omaha, Nebraska, a short drive up Interstate 29 from Kansas City.

Fort Myers Royals

The Fort Myers Royals were a minor league affiliate of the Kansas City Royals from 1978-1987. In 1978 the Royals were brought to Fort Myers, Florida by the Kansas City franchise. This was because Fort Myers served as the spring training home of the Kansas City Royals. The Royals were a Single A Florida State League franchise. The team played at Terry Park Ballfield from 1978 until 1987. In 1985 the Royals won the Florida State League Championship. Kevin Seitzer and Bret Saberhagen were members of that Fort Myers Royals team. The Minor League franchise left Fort Myers in 1988 when the Major League Baseball franchise moved Spring Training to Haines City, Florida and Baseball City Stadium.

Kansas City Royals award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Kansas City Royals professional baseball team.

List of Kansas City Royals Opening Day starting pitchers

The Kansas City Royals are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Kansas City, Missouri. They play in the American League Central division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Kansas City Royals have used 23 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 48 seasons. The 23 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 13 wins, 20 losses and 15 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.

The Kansas City Royals began to play in 1969. Wally Bunker was the Royals’ first Opening Day starting pitcher on April 8, 1969 against the Minnesota Twins. The Royals have played in two home ball parks. They played in Municipal Stadium from 1969 through 1972. They played three Opening Day games at Municipal Stadium, winning twice and losing once. The Royals’ starting pitchers received no decisions in both of the wins, leaving their record in Opening Day starts at Municipal Stadium no wins, one loss and two no decisions. They moved to Royals Stadium, which was subsequently renamed Kauffman Stadium, 1973. They have played 20 Opening Day games there, and their starting pitchers have eight wins and eight losses with four no decisions. This makes their record at home in Opening Day games eight wins and nine losses with six no decisions. In Opening Day games on the road, their starting pitchers have a record of four wins and eleven losses with eight no decisions.Kevin Appier has most Opening Day starts for the Royals, with seven, including six in a row from 1992 to 1997. He has a record of 1–4 with two no decisions in those starts. The other Royal pitchers who have made at least three Opening Day starts are Dennis Leonard with four, and Paul Splittorff, Bud Black, Bret Saberhagen, Jeff Suppan and Gil Meche with three apiece. Bunker, Dick Drago, Steve Busby, Larry Gura and James Shields have each made two Opening Day starts for the Royals.Black, who has two wins as an Opening Day starting pitcher, is the only Royals pitcher who has won more than one Opening Day start. Black had a record in Opening Day starts of 2–1. Only two Royals pitchers had more than one loss in Opening Day starts, Kevin Appier with four losses and Dennis Leonard with three.The Royals played in the World Series in 1980, 1985, 2014 and 2015, winning in 1985 and 2015. Leonard, Black, Shields and Ventura were the Opening Day starting pitchers in 1980, 1985, 2014 and 2015 respectively, when the Royals played in the World Series, and they had a combined Opening Day record of 2–1 with one no decision.

List of New York Mets team records

This is a list of team records for the New York Mets baseball team.

Major League Baseball Pitcher of the Month Award

The Pitcher of the Month award is a Major League Baseball award named by each league for each month of the regular season. The National League started recognizing the award in 1975. The American League followed in 1979. Upon the introduction of each league's award, pitchers became ineligible for the (position players') player of the month award.

Slim Sallee

Harry Franklin Sallee (February 3, 1885 – March 23, 1950) was a professional baseball player. He was a left-handed pitcher over parts of fourteen seasons (1908–1921) with the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and Cincinnati Reds. For his career, he compiled a 174–143 record in 476 appearances, with a 2.56 earned run average and 836 strikeouts. In Cardinals' franchise history, Sallee ranks 3rd all-time in earned run average (2.67), 7th in innings pitched (1905.3), 8th in games started (215) and wins (106, tied with Adam Wainwright), and 7th in losses (107).

Sallee pitched in two World Series, both against the Chicago White Sox, and was a member of the victorious Reds in the infamous "Black Sox" 1919 World Series. He produced the best season of his career for the 1919 Reds, going 21–7 with a 2.06 earned run average. He lost a World Series to the White Sox as a member of the 1917 Giants, starting Game 1 and losing 2-1 to Sox ace Eddie Cicotte in Chicago, driving in his team's only run. In World Series play, Sallee compiled a 1–3 record in four appearances, with a 3.45 earned run average and six strikeouts. Also in 1919, Sallee became just the second pitcher (at that time) to have more wins than walks in a season. Christy Mathewson did it twice (1913, 1914) and Bret Saberhagen accomplished this feat in 1994 with the New York Mets.

Sallee was born and later died in Higginsport, Ohio at the age of 65. He was buried at Confidence Cemetery in Georgetown, Ohio.

Sporting News Comeback Player of the Year Award

The Sporting News Comeback Player of the Year Award is the oldest of three annual awards in Major League Baseball given to one player in each league who has reemerged as a star in that season. It was established in 1965. The winner in each league is selected by the TSN editorial staff.

In 2005, Major League Baseball officially sponsored its own Comeback Player of the Year Award for the first time. TSN and MLB honored the same players in 2005—Ken Griffey, Jr. in the National League and Jason Giambi in the American League. The Players Choice Awards, awarded by the Major League Baseball Players Association, also began a Comeback Player honor in 1992.

Listed below are the players honored with the TSN award by year, name, team and league.

World Series Most Valuable Player Award

The Willie Mays World Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is given to the player deemed to have the most impact on his team's performance in the World Series, which is the final round of the Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason. The award was first presented in 1955 as the SPORT Magazine Award, but is now decided during the final game of the Series by a committee of reporters and officials present at the game. On September 29, 2017, it was renamed in honor of Willie Mays in remembrance of the 63rd anniversary of The Catch. Mays never won the award himself.

Pitchers have been named Series MVP twenty-seven times; four of them were relief pitchers. Twelve of the first fourteen World Series MVPs were won by pitchers; from 1969 until 1986, the proportion of pitcher MVPs declined—Rollie Fingers (1974) and Bret Saberhagen (1985) were the only two pitchers to win the award in this period. From 1987 until 1991, all of the World Series MVPs were pitchers, and, since 1995, pitchers have won the award nine times. Bobby Richardson of the 1960 New York Yankees is the only player in World Series history to be named MVP despite being on the losing team.

The most recent winner was Steve Pearce of the Boston Red Sox, who won the award in 2018.

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