Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry

Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry is a 63.3 hectares (156 acres) biological and geological Site of Special Scientific Interest north-east of Worthington in Leicestershire.[1][2] It is a Geological Conservation Review site.[3] An area of 33 hectares (82 acres) is managed as a nature reserve by the Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust.[4]

Cloud Wood is an ancient semi-natural wood on clay. It has a very diverse ground flora, including pendulous sedge, yellow archangel and giant bellflower. The quarry is a nationally important geological locality, exposing a Lower Carboniferous succession deposited in shallow seas.[5]

There is public access to most of the nature reserve, but not to the quarry.

Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry
Site of Special Scientific Interest
Cloud Wood 3
Cloud Wood
Area of SearchLeicestershire
Grid referenceSK 414 213 [1]
InterestBiological
Geological
Area63.3 hectares (156 acres)[1]
Notification1987[1]
Location mapMagic Map

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  2. ^ "Map of Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  3. ^ "Breedon Cloud Quarry (Dinantian of Northern England & North Wales)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  4. ^ "Cloud Wood". Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  5. ^ "Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 November 2017.

Coordinates: 52°47′10″N 1°23′13″W / 52.786°N 1.387°W

Charnwood Forest

Charnwood Forest is an upland tract in north-western Leicestershire, England, bounded by Leicester, Loughborough and Coalville. The area is undulating, rocky and picturesque, with barren areas. It also has some extensive tracts of woodland; its elevation is generally 600 feet (180 m) and upwards, the area exceeding this height being about 6,100 acres (25 km2). The highest point, Bardon Hill, is 912 feet (278 m). On its western flank lies an abandoned coalfield, with Coalville and other former mining villages, now being regenerated and replanted as part of the National Forest. The M1 motorway, between junctions 22 and 23, cuts through Charnwood Forest.

The hard stone of Charnwood Forest has been quarried for centuries, and was a source of whetstones and quern-stones. The granite quarries at Bardon Hill, Buddon Hill and Whitwick supply crushed aggregate to a wide area of southern Britain.

The forest is an important recreational area with woodland walks, noted for their displays of bluebells in the early spring, rock climbing and hillwalking. Popular places with public access include Bardon Hill, Beacon Hill, Bradgate Park, Swithland Wood and the Outwoods and Stoneywell Cottage (National Trust).

Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust

The Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust (LRWT) is one of 47 wildlife trusts across the United Kingdom. It manages nature reserves in Leicestershire and Rutland, and was founded in 1956 as the Leicestershire and Rutland Trust for Nature Conservation. As of January 2018, it has over 16,000 members, a staff of about 25 and more than 500 volunteers. It is based in Leicester, and is managed by a Council of Trustees which is elected by the members. It is a charity which covers all aspects of nature conservation, and works to protect wild places and wildlife.Leicestershire has an area of 833 square miles (2,160 km2), and a population according to the 2011 census of 980,000. Leicester City Council is a unitary authority, and the rest of the county is administered by Leicestershire County Council at the top level, with seven district councils in the second tier, Blaby, Charnwood, Harborough, Hinckley and Bosworth, Melton, North West Leicestershire and Oadby and Wigston. Rutland is mainly rural, but has two market towns, Oakham, the county town, and Uppingham. The county has an area of 151.5 square miles (392 square kilometres), and the 2011 census showed a population of 37,400.LRWT manages thirty-three reserves covering almost 1,200 hectares (3,000 acres). Nineteen are designated Sites of Special Scientific Interest, two are National Nature Reserves, one is a Ramsar internationally important wetland site, one is a Special Protection Area under the European Union Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds, two are Nature Conservation Review sites, three contain Geological Conservation Review sites, one contains a Scheduled Monument, one is a Local Nature Reserve and two are owned by the National Trust. The largest is Rutland Water at 393 hectares (970 acres), a major wetland area which is one of the richest reservoirs for wintering wildfowl in the country. The smallest is Bloody Oaks Quarry at 1.3 hectares (3.2 acres), which has species-rich grassland on Jurassic limestone.

List of Sites of Special Scientific Interest in Leicestershire

Leicestershire is a county in the East Midlands of England with an area of 833 square miles (2,160 km2), and a population according to the 2011 census of 980,000. Leicester City Council is a unitary authority, and the rest of the county is administered by Leicestershire County Council at the top level, with seven district councils in the second tier, Blaby, Charnwood, Harborough, Hinckley and Bosworth, Melton, North West Leicestershire and Oadby and Wigston.In England, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) are designated by Natural England, a non-departmental public body which is responsible for protecting England's natural environment. Designation as an SSSI gives legal protection to the most important wildlife and geological sites. As of January 2018, there are seventy-six SSSIs in the county, fifty-seven of which are designated for their biology, twelve for their geology and seven for both criteria.

There are nineteen Geological Conservation Review sites, six Nature Conservation Review sites, one Special Area of Conservation, three National Nature Reserves, two are Common Land, and three contain Scheduled Monuments. One site is a Local Nature Reserve, thirteen are managed by the Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust, and one by the National Trust. The largest site is Bradgate Park and Cropston Reservoir at 399.3 hectares (987 acres). It has rocks dating to the Ediacaran period around 600 million years ago, and is very important for the study of Precambrian palaeontology. The smallest is Gipsy Lane Pit at 0.5 hectares (1.2 acres), which is important to mineralogists as it is rich in sulphides, some of which are unidentified.

Biological
Geological
Blaby
Charnwood
Harborough
Hinckley and Bosworth
Melton
North West Leicestershire
Oadby and Wigston
Rutland

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.