Brazil women's national football team

The Brazil women's national football team represents Brazil in women's association football and is run by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF). It has participated in eight editions of the FIFA Women's World Cup, finishing as runner-up in 2007, and seven editions of the Copa América Femenina.

Brazil played their first game on 22 July 1986 against the United States, losing 2–1.[2]

The team finished the 1999 World Cup in third place and the 2007 in second, losing to Germany in the final, 2–0. Brazil won the silver medal twice in the Olympic Games, in 2004 and 2008, after getting fourth place in the two previous editions.

Brazil is the most successful women's national team in South America, having won the first four editions of the Copa América championship. Since 1999 they have been contenders for the World title. In 1998 and 1999, the team was the runner-up of the Women's U.S. Cup.

In 2017, the Brazilian Football Confederation's decision to fire head coach Emily Lima sparked protest among the team's players. The dispute evolved into an argument for greater wages and more respect and recognition for the country's female football players. As a result, players such as Cristiane, Rosana, and Francielle announced their retirement from international football, hoping that this decision might make a difference in the years to come.[3][4]

Brazil
Nickname(s)Seleção (The National Squad)
As Canarinhas (The Female Canaries)
Verde-Amarela (Green-and-Yellow)
AssociationConfederação Brasileira de Futebol (CBF)
ConfederationCONMEBOL (South America)
Head coachVadão
CaptainMarta
Most capsFormiga (188)
Top scorerMarta (111)
FIFA codeBRA
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 10 Steady (12 July 2019)[1]
Highest2 (March 2009)
Lowest10 (August 2016, March 2019)
First international
 United States 2–1 Brazil 
(Jesolo, Italy; 22 July 1986)
Biggest win
 Brazil 15–0 Bolivia 
(Uberlândia, Brazil; 18 January 1995)
 Brazil 15–0 Peru 
(Mar del Plata, Argentina; 2 March 1998)
Biggest defeat
 United States 6–0 Brazil 
(Denver, United States; 26 September 1999)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1991)
Best resultRunner-up (2007)
Copa América
Appearances7 (first in 1991)
Best resultChampions (1991, 1995, 1998, 2003, 2010, 2014, 2018)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2000)
Best resultRunners-up (2000)

Statistics

World Cup

Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
China 1991 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 1 7
Sweden 1995 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 3 8
United States 1999 Third Place 3rd 6 3 2 1 16 9
United States 2003 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 9 4
China 2007 Runners-up 2nd 6 5 0 1 17 4
Germany 2011 Quarter-finals 5th 4 3 1 0 9 2
Canada 2015 Round of 16 9th 4 3 0 1 4 1
France 2019 Round of 16 4 2 0 2 7 5
Total 8/8 34 20 4 10 66 40
FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
China 1991 Group stage 17 November  Japan W 1–0 New Plaza Stadium, Foshan
19 November  United States L 0–5 Ying Dong Stadium, Panyu
21 November  Sweden L 0–2
Sweden 1995 Group stage 5 June  Sweden W 1–0 Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg
7 June  Japan L 1–2 Tingvallen, Karlstad
9 June  Germany L 1–6
United States 1999 Group stage 19 June  Mexico W 7–1 Giants Stadium, East Rutherford
24 June  Italy W 2–0 Soldier Field, Chicago
27 June  Germany D 3–3 Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover
Quarter-finals 1 July  Nigeria W 4–3 aet
Semi-finals 4 July  United States L 0–2 Stanford Stadium, Stanford
Third place play-off 10 July  Norway D 0–0 (5–4 p) Rose Bowl, Pasadena
United States 2003 Group stage 21 September  South Korea W 3–0 RFK Stadium, Washington, D.C.
24 September  Norway W 4–1
27 September  France D 1–1
Quarter-finals 1 October  Sweden L 1–2 Gillette Stadium, Foxborough
China 2007 Group stage 12 September  New Zealand W 5–0 Wuhan Stadium, Wuhan
15 September  China PR W 4–0
20 September  Denmark W 1–0 Yellow Dragon Sports Center, Hangzhou
Quarter-finals 23 September  Australia W 3–2 Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium, Tianjin
Semi-finals 27 September  United States W 4–0 Yellow Dragon Sports Center, Hangzhou
Final 30 September  Germany L 0–2 Hongkou Stadium, Shanghai
Germany 2011 Group stage 29 June  Australia W 1–0 Borussia-Park, Mönchengladbach
3 July  Norway W 3–0 Volkswagen-Arena, Wolfsburg
6 July  Equatorial Guinea W 3–0 Commerzbank-Arena, Frankfurt
Quarter-finals 10 July  United States D 2–2 (3-5 p) Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion, Dresden
Canada 2015 Group stage 9 June  South Korea W 2–0 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
13 June  Spain W 1–0
17 June  Costa Rica W 1–0 Moncton Stadium, Moncton
Round of 16 21 June  Australia L 0–1
France 2019 Group stage 9 June  Jamaica W 3–0 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
13 June  Australia L 2–3 Stade de la Mosson, Montpellier
18 June  Italy W 1–0 Stade du Hainaut, Valenciennes
Round of 16 23 June  France L 1–2 (aet) Stade Océane, Le Havre

Olympic Games

Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
United States 1996 Fourth Place 4th 5 1 2 2 7 8
Australia 2000 Fourth Place 4th 5 2 0 3 5 6
Greece 2004 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 0 2 15 4
China 2008 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 11 5
United Kingdom 2012 Quarter-Finals 6th 4 2 0 2 6 3
Brazil 2016 Fourth Place 4th 6 2 3 1 9 3
Japan 2020 Qualified
Total 6/6 32 15 6 11 53 29

Pan American Games

Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
Canada 1999 Did not compete
Dominican Republic 2003 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 14 2
Brazil 2007 Champions 1st 6 6 0 0 33 0
Mexico 2011 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 2 0 6 2
Canada 2015 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 20 3
Peru 2019 Did Not Qualify
Total 4/6 20 18 2 0 73 7

Copa América Feminina

Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
Brazil 1991 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 12 1
Brazil 1995 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 44 1
Argentina 1998 Champions 1st 6 6 0 0 66 3
Peru 2003 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 18 2
Argentina 2006 Runners-up 2nd 7 6 0 1 30 4
Ecuador 2010 Champions 1st 7 7 0 0 25 2
Ecuador 2014 Champions 1st 7 5 1 1 22 3
Chile 2018 Champions 1st 7 7 0 0 31 2
Total 8/8 44 41 1 2 248 18

Team

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the roster for the 2019 FIFA World Cup.[5]

Head coach: Vadão

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Bárbara 4 July 1988 (age 31) 70 0 Brazil Kindermann
12 GK Aline Villares 15 April 1989 (age 30) 8 0 Spain Granadilla
22 GK Letícia Izidoro 13 August 1994 (age 24) 1 0 Brazil Corinthians

2 DF Poliana 6 February 1991 (age 28) 61 5 Brazil São José
3 DF Daiane Limeira 7 September 1997 (age 21) 4 0 France Paris Saint-Germain
4 DF Tayla 9 May 1992 (age 27) 17 1 Portugal Benfica
6 DF Tamires 10 October 1987 (age 31) 90 4 Denmark Fortuna Hjørring
13 DF Letícia Santos 2 December 1994 (age 24) 20 0 Germany SC Sand
14 DF Kathellen 26 April 1996 (age 23) 4 0 France Bordeaux
15 DF Camila Martins 10 October 1994 (age 24) 17 2 United States Orlando Pride
21 DF Mônica 21 April 1987 (age 32) 58 9 Brazil Corinthians

5 MF Thaisa 17 December 1988 (age 30) 78 5 Italy Milan
8 MF Formiga 3 March 1978 (age 41) 186 26 France Paris Saint-Germain
17 MF Andressinha 1 May 1995 (age 24) 69 10 Brazil EC Iranduba da Amazonia
18 MF Luana 2 May 1993 (age 26) 7 0 South Korea Hwacheon KSPO

7 FW Andressa Alves 10 November 1992 (age 26) 82 18 Italy Roma
9 FW Debinha 20 October 1991 (age 27) 81 28 United States North Carolina Courage
10 FW Marta (captain) 19 February 1986 (age 33) 144 105 United States Orlando Pride
11 FW Cristiane 15 May 1985 (age 34) 138 89 Brazil São Paulo
16 FW Beatriz 17 December 1993 (age 25) 68 22 South Korea Hyundai Steel Red Angels
19 FW Ludmila 11 December 1994 (age 24) 12 1 Spain Atlético Madrid
20 FW Raquel 21 March 1991 (age 28) 46 8 Unattached
23 FW Geyse 27 March 1998 (age 21) 7 0 Portugal Benfica

Recent call-ups

The following players were named to a squad in the last 12 months.[6][7][8][9][10]

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Luciana 24 July 1987 (age 31) 37 0 Brazil Ferroviária 2019 SheBelieves Cup
GK Tainá 1 May 1995 (age 24) Brazil Corinthians 2018 Tournament of NationsPRE

DF Joyce 22 March 1988 (age 31) Spain Granadilla v.  Scotland, 8 April 2019
DF Jucinara 3 June 1993 (age 26) Unattached v.  Scotland, 8 April 2019
DF Érika 4 February 1988 (age 31) 65 13 Brazil Corinthians v.  Scotland, 8 April 2019
DF Daiane 7 September 1997 (age 21) France Paris Saint-Germain v.  France, 10 November 2018
DF Rilany 26 June 1986 (age 33) Spain Atlético Madrid v.  France, 10 November 2018
DF Bruna Benites 16 October 1985 (age 33) China Guangdong Meizhou Huijun v.  England, 6 October 2018
DF Rafaelle 18 June 1991 (age 28) China Changchun Zhuoyue v.  England, 6 October 2018
DF Ana Carolina 21 August 1990 (age 28) Brazil Flamengo 2018 Tournament of NationsPRE

MF Juliana 22 December 1991 (age 27) Brazil Flamengo 2019 SheBelieves Cup
MF Djenifer 25 June 1995 (age 24) Brazil Iranduba 2018 Tournament of NationsPRE
MF Rayanne 16 June 1994 (age 25) Brazil Flamengo 2018 Tournament of Nations

FW Darlene 11 January 1990 (age 29) 33 4 Portugal Benfica v.  Scotland, 8 April 2019
FW Kerolin 17 November 1999 (age 19) Brazil Ponte Preta v.  France, 10 November 2018
FW Nenê 20 July 1988 (age 30) Brazil Corinthians 2018 Tournament of Nations PRE
FW Thaís 20 January 1993 (age 26) 25 4 South Korea Incheon Red Angels 2018 Tournament of Nations

  • PRE Preliminary squad / standby
  • INJ Injury

Schedule and results

2020

Competitive record

Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
United States 2000 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 22 3
Total 1/9 5 3 1 1 22 3
Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
Brazil 2009 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 14 5
Brazil 2010 Runners-up 2nd 4 2 2 0 8 4
Brazil 2011 Champions 1st 4 3 0 1 11 3
Brazil 2012 Champions 1st 4 2 1 1 9 5
Brazil 2013 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 10 1
Brazil 2014 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 11 3
Brazil 2015 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 22 2
Brazil 2016 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 18 4
Total 7/7 32 25 5 2 103 27
Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
Portugal 2015 Seventh-place match 7th 4 2 1 1 7 4
Portugal 2016 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 8 3
Total 2/2 8 5 1 2 15 7

Head coaches

Name Period
Zé Duarte 1995-2004
René Simões 2004
Luiz Antônio 2004–2006
Jorge Barcellos 2006–2008
Kleiton Lima 2008–2011
Jorge Barcellos 2011–2012
Márcio Oliveira 2012–2014
Vadão 2014–2016
Emily Lima 2016–2017
Vadão 2017–

Player records

Top 10 scorers

Rank Player Goals Caps Goals per game Years
1 Marta 111 145 0,77 2003–
2 Cristiane 95 140 0,68 2003–
3 Pretinha 41 67 0,62 1991–2014
4 Roseli 35 45 0,78 1988–2004
5 Sissi 30 47 0,64 1988–2000
6 Kátia Cilene 25 47 0,54 1995–2007
Formiga 25 188 0,13 1995–
7 Debinha 21 58 0,36 2011–
8 Daniela Alves 18 57 0,32 1999–2008
9 Rosana 17 114 0,15 2000–2017
10 Andressa Alves 16 67 0,23 2012–

10 most capped players

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Formiga 188 25 1995–
2 Marta 145 111 2003–
3 Cristiane 140 95 2003–
4 Rosana 114 17 2000–2017
5 Andréia Suntaque 96 0 1999–2015
6 Fabiana 82 7 2006–
7 Tânia Maranhão 81 0 1995–2011
8 Renata Costa 78 8 2003–2012
9 Maycon 77 5 1998–2011
10 Tamires 72 4 2013–

All time results

As of 24 June 2016; Counted for the FIFA A-level matches only.
Nations First Played P W D L GF GA GD Confederation
 Argentina 1995 12 9 1 2 40 9 +31 CONMEBOL
 Australia 1988 13 8 0 5 20 13 +7 AFC
 Bolivia 1995 3 3 0 0 27 1 +26 CONMEBOL
 Cameroon 2012 1 1 0 0 5 0 +5 CAF
 Canada 1996 18 8 6 4 32 18 +14 CONCACAF
 Chile 1991 10 10 0 0 41 4 +37 CONMEBOL
 China PR 1986 10 5 4 1 20 7 +13 AFC
 Colombia 1998 8 7 1 0 39 4 +35 CONMEBOL
 Costa Rica 2000 4 4 0 0 14 1 +13 CONCACAF
 Denmark 2007 5 3 1 1 7 5 +2 UEFA
 Ecuador 1995 5 5 0 0 45 2 +43 CONMEBOL
 England 2012 2 0 0 2 1 3 −2 UEFA
 Equatorial Guinea 2011 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 CAF
 Finland 1999 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 UEFA
 France 2003 6 0 4 2 5 8 −3 UEFA
 Germany 1995 11 1 4 6 12 25 −13 UEFA
 Ghana 2008 1 1 0 0 5 1 +4 CAF
 Greece 2004 1 1 0 0 7 0 +7 UEFA
 Haiti 2003 1 1 0 0 5 0 +5 CONCACAF
 Italy 1999 3 3 0 0 9 2 +7 UEFA
 Jamaica 2007 1 1 0 0 5 0 +5 CONCACAF
 Japan 1991 8 3 1 4 8 11 −3 AFC
 Mexico 1998 11 10 0 1 48 7 +41 CONCACAF
 Netherlands 1988 4 3 1 0 7 4 +3 UEFA
 New Zealand 2007 8 4 3 2 14 4 +10 OFC
 Nigeria 1999 2 2 0 0 7 4 +3 AFC
 North Korea 2008 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 AFC
 Norway 1988 8 4 2 2 14 9 +5 UEFA
 Paraguay 2006 4 4 0 0 17 2 +15 CONMEBOL
 Peru 1998 3 3 0 0 20 0 +20 CONMEBOL
 Portugal 2012 2 2 0 0 7 1 +6 UEFA
 Russia 1996 3 2 1 0 9 2 +7 UEFA
 Scotland 1996 5 4 0 1 21 3 +18 UEFA
 South Korea 1999 4 3 0 1 10 3 +7 AFC
 Spain 2015 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 UEFA
 Sweden 1991 9 5 1 3 14 9 +5 UEFA
  Switzerland 2015 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 UEFA
 Thailand 1988 1 1 0 0 9 0 +9 AFC
 Trinidad and Tobago 2000 2 2 0 0 22 0 +22 CONCACAF
 Ukraine 1996 1 1 0 0 7 0 +7 UEFA
 Uruguay 2006 3 2 1 0 14 0 +14 CONMEBOL
 United States 1986 34 3 5 26 23 75 −52 CONCACAF
 Venezuela 1991 6 6 0 0 37 0 +37 CONMEBOL

See also

References

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  2. ^ "Seleção Brasileira Feminina (Brazilian National Womens´ Team) 1986–1995". RSSSF. 20 September 2014. Retrieved 23 December 2014.
  3. ^ "Soccer: Cristiane among players to quit Brazilian National Team". Excelle Sports. 28 September 2017. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  4. ^ Panja, Tariq (6 October 2017). "Brazil's Women Soccer Players in Revolt Against Federation". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  5. ^ "Marta, Formiga lead Brazil Women's World Cup squad". SI.com.
  6. ^ "Seleção Feminina convocada para Torneio She Believes" (in Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation. 21 February 2019. Retrieved 13 April 2019.
  7. ^ "Seleção Brasileira Feminina é convocada para o último amistoso de 2018" (in Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation. 2 November 2018. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  8. ^ "Seleção Feminina convocada para amistoso contra a Inglaterra" (in Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation. 20 September 2018. Retrieved 13 April 2019.
  9. ^ "Seleção Feminina convocada para Torneio das Nações" (in Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation. 21 July 2018. Retrieved 13 April 2019.
  10. ^ "Seleção Feminina convocada para período de treinamentos" (in Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation. 10 July 2018. Retrieved 13 April 2019.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
South American Champions
1991 (First title)
1995 (Second title)
1998 (Third title)
2003 (Fourth title)
Succeeded by
2006 Argentina 
Preceded by
2006 Argentina 
South American Champions
2010 (Fifth title)
2014 (Sixth title)
Succeeded by
Incumbents
1991 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 1991 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 90th season of competitive football in the country.

1995 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 1995 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 94th season of competitive football in the country.

1996 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 1996 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 95th season of competitive football in the country.

2000 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2000 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 99th season of competitive football in the country.

2001 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2001 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 100th season of competitive football in the country.

2002 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2002 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 101st season of competitive football in the country.

2003 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2003 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 102nd season of competitive football in the country.

2004 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2004 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 103rd season of competitive football in the country.

2005 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2005 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 104th season of competitive football in the country.

2006 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2006 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 105th season of competitive football in the country.

2007 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

The final of the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup was played between Germany and Brazil. The match took place at the Hongkou Football Stadium, in Shanghai, China, on 30 September 2007.

2007 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2007 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 106th season of competitive football in the country.

2008 in Brazilian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2008 football (soccer) season in Brazil, which was the 107th season of competitive football in the country.

Brazil women's national under-17 football team

The Brazil U-17 women's national football team is an international youth football team. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the Brazil women's national football team. The team won gold at the 2010 and 2012 South American Under-17 Women's Championship.

Brazil women's national under-20 football team

The Brazil U-20 women's national soccer team is a youth soccer team operated under the Brazilian Football Confederation. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the Brazil women's national football team. In the history of u-20 national team, the Brazilians won all editions of the South American Under-20 Women's Football Championship 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2015.

The best placement of the Brazil U-20 in the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was in 2006, at the time the Brazilians won the bronze medal.

Kleiton Lima

Kleiton Barbosa de Oliveira Lima (born 5 May 1974), known as Kleiton Lima, is a Brazilian football manager.

Nalvinha

Nalvinha (born 14 July 1965) is a Brazilian footballer who played as a forward for the Brazil women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup and 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup.

René Simões

René Rodrigues Simões (born December 17, 1952) is a Brazilian football head coach and former footballer, who is the current manager.

Vadão

Oswaldo Fumeiro Alvarez (born 21 August 1956), more commonly known as Vadão, is a Brazililan football manager. He currently is the head coach for the Brazil women's national football team.

5 April 2018 2019 WWCQ GSBrazil 3–1 ArgentinaCoquimbo, Chile
19:00
Report Banini Goal 54' Stadium: Estadio Municipal Francisco Sánchez Rumoroso
Referee: Claudia Umpiérrez (Uruguay)
7 April 2018 2019 WWCQ GSBrazil 8–0 EcuadorCoquimbo, Chile
19:00
Report Stadium: Estadio Municipal Francisco Sánchez Rumoroso
Referee: Dione Rissios (Chile)
11 April 2018 2019 WWCQ GSBrazil 4–0 VenezuelaCoquimbo, Chile
19:00
Report Stadium: Estadio Municipal Francisco Sánchez Rumoroso
Referee: Olga Miranda (Paraguay)
13 April 2018 2019 WWCQ GSBolivia 0–7 BrazilCoquimbo, Chile
19:00 Report
Stadium: Estadio Municipal Francisco Sánchez Rumoroso
Referee: Elizabeth Tintaya (Peru)
16 April 2018 2019 WWCQ FSBrazil 3–1 ChileLa Serena, Chile
19:00
Report López Goal 63' Stadium: Estadio La Portada
Referee: Olga Miranda (Paraguay)
19 April 2018 2019 WWCQ FSBrazil 3–0 ArgentinaLa Serena, Chile
16:45
Report Stadium: Estadio La Portada
Referee: Susana Corella (Ecuador)
22 April 2018 2019 WWCQ FSBrazil 3–0 ColombiaLa Serena, Chile
19:00
Report Stadium: Estadio La Portada
26 July 2018 2018 Tournament of NationsBrazil 1–3 AustraliaKansas City, United States
15:15 Debihna Goal 79' Poliana Goal 8'(o.g)
Butt Goal 39'
Kerr Goal 49'
Stadium: Children's Mercy Park
29 July 2018 2018 Tournament of NationsBrazil 2–1 JapanEast Hartford, United States
16:15 Marta Goal 76'
Beatriz Goal 90'
Masuya Goal 90+3' Stadium: Pratt & Whitney Stadium
Attendance: 13,027
2 August 2018 2018 Tournament of NationsBrazil 1–4 United StatesBridgeview, United States
20:30
Report
Stadium: Toyota Park
Attendance: 18,309
Referee: Quetzalli Alvarado (Mexico)
2 September 2018 FriendlyCanada 1–0 BrazilOttawa, Canada
14:00 EDT Prince Goal 48' Stadium: TD Place Stadium
Attendance: 16,128
6 October 2018 FriendlyEngland 1–0 BrazilNottingham, England
12:30
Stadium: Meadow Lane
Attendance: 7,864
10 November 2018 FriendlyFrance 3–1 BrazilNice, France
Stadium: Allianz Riviera
27 February 2019 SheBelieves CupEngland 2–1 BrazilChester, Pennsylvania
16:00 EST
Report Stadium: Talen Energy Stadium
Attendance: 5,954
Referee: Ekaterina Koroleva (United States)
3 March 2019 SheBelieves CupJapan 3–1 BrazilNashville, United States
4:00
Stadium: Nissan Stadium, Nashville, Tennessee
Attendance: 12,586
Referee: Karen Abt (United States)
5 March 2019 SheBelieves CupUnited States 1–0 BrazilTampa, Florida
20:00 ET
Report Stadium: Raymond James Stadium
Attendance: 14,009
Referee: Carol Anne Chénard (Canada)
5 April 2019 FriendlySpain 2–1 BrazilDon Benito
19:00
Stadium: Estadio Vicente Sanz
8 April 2019 FriendlyScotland 1–0 BrazilSan Pedro del Pinatar, Spain
19:00
Stadium: Pinatar Arena Football Centre
9 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWCBrazil 3–0 JamaicaGrenoble, France
15:30 Cristiane Goal 15'50'64' Report Stadium: Stade des Alpes
Referee: Riem Hussein (Germany)
13 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWCAustralia 3–2 BrazilMontpellier, France
18:00
Report
Stadium: Stade de la Mosson
Attendance: 17,032
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)
18 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWCItaly 0–1 BrazilValenciennes, France
21:00 Report
Stadium: Stade du Hainaut
Attendance: 21,669
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)
23 June 2019 2019 FIFA WWCFrance 2–1 (a.e.t.) BrazilLe Havre, France
21:00
Report
Stadium: Stade Océane
Attendance: 23,965
Referee: Marie-Soleil Beaudoin (Canada)
July/August 2019 2019 Pan American GamesBrazil vTBD
Report
July/August 2019 2019 Pan American GamesBrazil vTBD
Report
July/August 2019 2019 Pan American GamesBrazil vTBD
Report
July 2020 2020 OlympicsBrazil vTBD
Report
July 2020 2020 OlympicsBrazil vTBD
Report
July 2020 2020 OlympicsBrazil vTBD
Report
Brazil squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
Brazil women's football squads – Summer Olympics
Brazil at the FIFA Women's World Cup
Argentina Argentina (AFA)
Bolivia Bolivia (FBF)
Brazil Brazil (CBF)
Chile Chile (FFC)
Colombia Colombia (FCF)
Ecuador Ecuador (FEF)
Paraguay Paraguay (APF)
Peru Peru (FPF)
Uruguay Uruguay (AUF)
Venezuela Venezuela (FVF)
National team competitions
Club competitions
Male teams
Female teams
Mixed teams

Languages

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