Branchinecta sandiegonensis

Branchinecta sandiegonensis is a rare species of crustacean in the family Branchinectidae and the order Anostraca, the fairy shrimp. Its common name is San Diego fairy shrimp. It is native to southern California in the United States and Baja California in Mexico. It is a federally listed endangered species of the United States.[1]

This fairy shrimp is 8 to 16 millimeters in length.[2]

This organism occurs between Santa Barbara, California, and northwestern Baja California, with its distribution centered in San Diego County, California. It lives in vernal pool habitat. It has been identified at 137 vernal pool complexes, many of which have since been extirpated. Others, however, have been restored and preserved, and the shrimp has been reintroduced into appropriate pool habitat.[1]

Branchinecta sandiegonensis
Branchinecta sandiegonensis
Tentatively identified as B. sandiegonensis
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Subphylum:
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B. sandiegonensis
Binomial name
Branchinecta sandiegonensis
Fugate, 1993

References

  1. ^ a b USFWS. San Diego Fairy Shrimp Five-year Review. September 30, 2008.
  2. ^ Fugate, M. (1993). Branchinecta sandiegonensis, a new species of fairy shrimp (Crustacea: Anostroca) from Western North America. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 106 296-304.

External links

Branchinecta

Branchinecta is a genus of crustacean in family Branchinectidae. It includes around 50 species, found on all continents except Africa and Australia. Branchinecta gigas, the giant fairy shrimp, is the largest species in the order, with a length of up to 10 centimetres (4 in), and Branchinecta brushi lives at the highest altitude of any crustacean, at 5,930 metres (19,460 ft), a record it shares with the copepod Boeckella palustris. A new genus, Archaebranchinecta was established in 2011 for two species previously placed in Branchinecta.

Branchinecta achalensis Cesar, 1985

Branchinecta belki Maeda-Martínez, Obregón-Barboza & Dumont, 1992

Branchinecta brushi Hegna & Lazo-Wasem, 2010

Branchinecta campestris Lynch, 1960 – pocket-pouch fairy shrimp

Branchinecta coloradensis Packard, 1874 – Colorado fairy shrimp

Branchinecta constricta Rogers, 2006

Branchinecta conservatio Eng, Belk & Eriksen, 1990 – conservancy fairy shrimp

Branchinecta cornigera Lynch, 1958 – horned fairy shrimp

Branchinecta dissimilis Lynch, 1972 – Great Basin fairy shrimp

Branchinecta ferox (M. Milne-Edwards, 1840)

Branchinecta gaini Daday, 1910

Branchinecta gigas Lynch, 1937 – giant fairy shrimp

Branchinecta granulosa Daday, 1902

Branchinecta hiberna Rogers & Fugate, 2001 – winter fairy shrimp

Branchinecta iheringi Lilljeborg, 1889

Branchinecta kaibabensis Belk & Fugate, 2000 – Kaibab fairy shrimp

Branchinecta lateralis Rogers, 2006

Branchinecta leonensis Cesar, 1985

Branchinecta lindahli Packard, 1883 – versatile fairy shrimp

Branchinecta longiantenna Eng, Belk & Eriksen, 1990 – longhorn fairy shrimp

Branchinecta lynchi Eng, Belk & Eriksen, 1990 – vernal pool fairy shrimp

Branchinecta mackini Dexter, 1956 – alkali fairy shrimp

Branchinecta mediospina Rogers, Dasis & Murrow, 2011

Branchinecta mesovallensis Belk & Fugate, 2000 – mid-valley fairy shrimp

Branchinecta mexicana Maeda-Martínez, Obregón-Barboza & Dumont, 1992

Branchinecta minuta Smirnov, 1948

Branchinecta oriena Belk & Rogers, 2002

Branchinecta orientalis G. O. Sars, 1901

Branchinecta oterosanvicentei Obregón-Barboza, et al., 2002

Branchinecta packardi Pearse, 1912 – Packard fairy shrimp

Branchinecta paludosa (O. F. Müller, 1788) – circumpolar fairy shrimp

Branchinecta palustris Birabén, 1946

Branchinecta papillosa Birabén, 1946

Branchinecta potassa Belk, 1979 – Nebraska fairy shrimp

Branchinecta prima Cohen, 1983

Branchinecta raptor Rogers, Quinney, Weaver, and Olesen 2006

Branchinecta readingi Belk, 2000 – Reading fairy shrimp

Branchinecta rocaensis Cohen, 1982

Branchinecta sandiegonensis Fugate, 1993 – San Diego fairy shrimp

Branchinecta serrata Rogers, 2006

Branchinecta somuncurensis Cohen, 1983

Branchinecta tarensis Birabén, 1946

Branchinecta tolli (G. O. Sars, 1897)

Branchinecta valchetana Cohen, 1981

Branchinecta vuriloche Cohen, 1985

IUCN Red List endangered species (Animalia)

On 19 August 2018, the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species identified 4584 endangered species, subspecies, stocks and subpopulations.

List of endangered arthropods

As of July 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 616 endangered arthropod species. 6.5% of all evaluated arthropod species are listed as endangered.

The IUCN also lists 27 arthropod subspecies as endangered.

No subpopulations of arthropods have been evaluated by the IUCN.

For a species to be considered endangered by the IUCN it must meet certain quantitative criteria which are designed to classify taxa facing "a very high risk of extinction". An even higher risk is faced by critically endangered species, which meet the quantitative criteria for endangered species. Critically endangered arthropods are listed separately. There are 1010 arthropod species which are endangered or critically endangered.

Additionally 2875 arthropod species (30% of those evaluated) are listed as data deficient, meaning there is insufficient information for a full assessment of conservation status. As these species typically have small distributions and/or populations, they are intrinsically likely to be threatened, according to the IUCN. While the category of data deficient indicates that no assessment of extinction risk has been made for the taxa, the IUCN notes that it may be appropriate to give them "the same degree of attention as threatened taxa, at least until their status can be assessed."This is a complete list of endangered arthropod species and subspecies as evaluated by the IUCN.

List of endangered invertebrates

As of July 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 1163 endangered invertebrate species. 6.4% of all evaluated invertebrate species are listed as endangered.

The IUCN also lists 36 invertebrate subspecies as endangered.

No subpopulations of invertebrates have been evaluated by the IUCN.

For a species to be considered endangered by the IUCN it must meet certain quantitative criteria which are designed to classify taxa facing "a very high risk of exintction". An even higher risk is faced by critically endangered species, which meet the quantitative criteria for endangered species. Critically endangered invertebrates are listed separately. There are 2150 invertebrate species which are endangered or critically endangered.

Additionally 5278 invertebrate species (29% of those evaluated) are listed as data deficient, meaning there is insufficient information for a full assessment of conservation status. As these species typically have small distributions and/or populations, they are intrinsically likely to be threatened, according to the IUCN. While the category of data deficient indicates that no assessment of extinction risk has been made for the taxa, the IUCN notes that it may be appropriate to give them "the same degree of attention as threatened taxa, at least until their status can be assessed."This is a complete list of endangered invertebrate species and subspecies as evaluated by the IUCN.

United States Fish and Wildlife Service list of threatened and endangered arthropods

List of threatened and endangered arthropods, including insects, arachnids, and crustaceans under the United States Endangered Species Act as of October 2013.Key to Listing Status codes: E - Endangered. An animal or plant species in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.T - Threatened. An animal or plant species likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. SAE or SAT - Listed as Endangered or Threatened due to similarity of appearance. A species may be treated as endangered or threatened if it resembles in appearance a species which has been listed and enforcement personnel would have difficulty distinguishing between the listed and the unlisted species; if the effect of this difficulty is an additional threat to the listed species; and if such treatment of the unlisted species would improve protection for the listed species.

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