Braithwell

Braithwell is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England. It is about 1 mile (1.6 km) north from Maltby and 3 miles (5 km) south-east from Conisbrough. According to the 2001 Census the civil parish had a population of 1,056,[1] increasing slightly to 1,071 at the 2011 Census.[2]

In 1289, the village obtained a Royal Charter entitling it to hold a weekly Tuesday market and an annual eight-day fair - an unusually long duration. These were long discontinued by a survey of 1652, but a cross shaft survives with an inscription in Norman French which translates as "Jesus, son of Mary, think upon the brother of our king, I beseech you".[3]

Braithwell
St.James' church, Braithwell - geograph.org.uk - 84025

Church of St James, Braithwell
Braithwell is located in South Yorkshire
Braithwell
Braithwell
Location within South Yorkshire
Population1,070 (2011)
OS grid referenceSK531946
• London140 mi (230 km) S
Civil parish
  • Braithwell
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townROTHERHAM
Postcode districtS66
PoliceSouth Yorkshire
FireSouth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
EU ParliamentYorkshire and the Humber

References

  1. ^ "2001 UK Census".
  2. ^ "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 6 March 2016.
  3. ^ Hey, David; Medieval South Yorkshire, Landmark Publishing Ltd (2003) ISBN 1843060809

External links

A631 road

The A631 is a road running from Sheffield, South Yorkshire to Louth, Lincolnshire in England. It passes through the counties of South Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. The road has many towns on its route including Rotherham, Maltby, Gainsborough and Market Rasen. It is mostly single road throughout its length but has some stretches of dual carriageway as well. The road is approximately 65 miles (105 km) long.

Civil parishes in South Yorkshire

A civil parish is a country subdivision, forming the lowest unit of local government in England. There are 93 civil parishes in the ceremonial county of South Yorkshire, most of the county being unparished. At the 2001 census, there were 360,191 people living in the 93 parishes, increasing to 369,220 in 2011, accounting for 27.5 per cent of the county's population.

Diocese of Sheffield

The Diocese of Sheffield is an administrative division of the Church of England, part of the Province of York.

The Diocese of Sheffield was created under George V on 23 January 1914, by the division from the Diocese of York (along with that part of the Diocese of Southwell in the city of Sheffield). It covers most of the County of South Yorkshire (except Barnsley), with a small part of the East Riding of Yorkshire, one parish in North Yorkshire and one in North Lincolnshire – an area of almost 576 square miles (1,490 km2). It is headed by the Bishop of Sheffield and its Cathedral is Sheffield Cathedral.

The diocese is linked with the Diocese of Argentina. Since 1990 it has been linked with the Evangelical Church in Germany's Hattingen-Witten District in Westphalia.

Don Valley (UK Parliament constituency)

Don Valley is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 1997 by Caroline Flint of the Labour Party.

Doncaster Rural District

Doncaster was a rural district in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England from 1894 to 1974.

The rural district was created by the Local Government Act 1894 as successor to the Doncaster Rural Sanitary District. It consisted of an area surrounding, but not including, the town of Doncaster. Doncaster itself formed a separate municipal borough (from 1927 a county borough). The district underwent a number of boundary changes over its existence due to the expansion of Doncaster and the growth of a number of other towns.Doncaster Rural District Council were granted armorial bearings on 30 October 1947.

Great Central and Midland Joint Railway

The Great Central and Midland Joint Railway, formerly, before 1897, Sheffield and Midland Railway Companies' Committee, was a collection of joint railways, mainly in the Manchester and South Yorkshire areas.

Hellaby

Hellaby is a settlement and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. The population of the Civil Parish at the 2011 census was 825. It is situated 4.5 miles (7.2 km) east from the centre of Rotherham and forms a continuous urban area with Maltby, separated from the rest of Rotherham by Junction 1 (Bramley Interchange) of the M18. It is situated by Hellaby Brook and, whilst signposted as "Hellaby Village", the parish has no school, church or post office.

Hull and Barnsley Railway

The Hull Barnsley & West Riding Junction Railway and Dock Company (HB&WRJR&DCo.) was opened on 20 July 1885. It had a total projected length of 66 miles but never reached Barnsley, stopping a few miles short at Stairfoot. The name was changed to The Hull and Barnsley Railway (H&BR) in 1905. Its Alexandra Dock in Hull opened 16 July 1885.

The main line ran from Hull to Cudworth, with two other lines branching off at Wrangbrook Junction, the South Yorkshire Junction Railway to Denaby, and The Hull & South Yorkshire Extension Railway, an eight-mile branch to Wath-upon-Dearne, opened 31 March 1902. The company also had joint running powers on the Hull and Barnsley and Great Central Joint Railway (Gowdall and Braithwell Railway).

Before the Grouping of 1923, the line was taken over by the North Eastern Railway (NER). Following incorporation into the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER), duplicated infrastructure was closed or reduced in function – notably Cannon Street station and the Springhead Locomotive Works.

Closure of the greater part of the main line itself came during the time of British Railways. As of 2011 the elevated line in Hull with some of the extensions and alterations added by the NER and LNER are still in use and referred to as the Hull Docks Branch and has the Engineers' Line Reference of HJS.

Hull and Barnsley and Great Central Joint Railway

The Hull and Barnsley and Great Central Joint Railway (also known as the Gowdall and Braithwell Railway) was a joint line which ran from Aire Junction, on the main line of the Hull and Barnsley Railway, near Gowdall to the Great Central and Midland Joint Railway at Braithwell Junction.

List of places in Yorkshire

Map of places in Yorkshire compiled from this list

See the list of places in England for places in other counties.This is a list of cities, towns, villages and hamlets in the counties of the East Riding of Yorkshire, North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire.

See

List of civil parishes in the East Riding of Yorkshire,

List of civil parishes in North Yorkshire,

List of civil parishes in South Yorkshire,

List of civil parishes in West Yorkshire

for more detailed lists of civil parishes.

List of settlements in South Yorkshire by population

This is a list of settlements in South Yorkshire by population based on the results of the 2011 census. The next United Kingdom census will take place in 2021. In 2011, there were 34 built-up area subdivisions with 5,000 or more inhabitants in South Yorkshire, shown in the table below.

Maltby, South Yorkshire

Maltby is a former mining town and civil parish of 16,688 inhabitants (2011) in the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. It was historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It is located about 6 miles (10 km) east of Rotherham town centre and 10 miles (16 km) north-east of Sheffield city centre. It forms a continuous urban area with Hellaby, separated from the rest of Rotherham by the M18 motorway.

Maltby Academy

Maltby Academy is an academy school in the mining town of Maltby in South Yorkshire, England.

Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster

The Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster is a metropolitan borough of South Yorkshire in Yorkshire and the Humber Region of England.

In addition to the town of Doncaster, the borough covers the towns of Mexborough, Conisbrough, Thorne, Bawtry and Tickhill.

The borough was created on 1 April 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, as a merger of the former county borough of Doncaster along with the urban districts of Adwick le Street, Bentley with Arksey, Conisbrough, Mexborough, Tickhill along with Doncaster Rural District and Thorne Rural District, the parish of Finningley from East Retford Rural District and small parts of the parish of Harworth from Worksop Rural District from Nottinghamshire.

S postcode area

The S postcode area, also known as the Sheffield postcode area, is a group of postcode districts in and around eight settlements with post town status: Barnsley, Chesterfield, Dronfield, Hope Valley, Mexborough, Rotherham, Sheffield and Worksop in England. Of these Dronfield and Mexborough have one postal district.

Currently the area has 49 non-sequentially numbered postal districts, three of which are 'non-geographical' being for bulk users in Sheffield and Rotherham.

Silverwood Colliery

Silverwood Colliery was a colliery situated between Thrybergh and Ravenfield in Yorkshire, England. Originally called Dalton Main, it was renamed after a local woodland. It was owned by Dalton Main Collieries Ltd.

Sir Thomas Wharton Academy

Sir Thomas Wharton Academy is a coeducational academy school and sixth form located in Edlington, Doncaster, England. It accepts pupils from the surrounding areas including Balby, Braithwell, Conisbrough, Edlington, Loversall, Micklebring, Tickhill, Wadworth, Warmsworth and Woodfield Plantation.

Its feeder schools are Warmsworth Primary, Edlington Hilltop, Edlington Victoria, Wadworth Primary, Tickhill Estfeld and Tickhill St Mary's.

Sir Thomas Wharton Academy operates a tutor group system. In the past groups contained pupils of all ages, but in 2009 new tutor groups were formed which included two to four members of each year group, including members of the Sixth Form. Form groups were then changed again at the start of the 2014 school year to include only students up to Year 11. Sixth Form students now have their own specialised form groups. Then in 2017, Form Groups were changed again for Year 11 students to have their own Form Groups.

The school operates a house system, introduced at the same time as mixed age tutor groups. All pupils and members of staff are separated into one of four houses. Each house has its own pastoral care team which deals with student issues. The four houses are named after country halls: Cusworth (Purple), Brodsworth (Green), Chatsworth (Yellow) and Wentworth (Red). Different coloured ties are used to identify to which house students belong.

South Yorkshire

South Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in England. It is the southernmost county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region and had a population of 1.34 million in 2011. It has an area of 1,552 square kilometres (599 sq mi) and consists of four metropolitan boroughs, Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield. South Yorkshire was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972. Its largest settlement is Sheffield.

Lying on the east side of the Pennines, South Yorkshire is landlocked, and borders Derbyshire to the west and south-west, West Yorkshire to the north-west, North Yorkshire to the north, the East Riding of Yorkshire to the north-east, Lincolnshire to the east and Nottinghamshire to the south-east. The Sheffield Urban Area is the tenth most populous conurbation in the United Kingdom, and dominates the western half of South Yorkshire with over half of the county's population living within it. South Yorkshire lies within the Sheffield City Region with Barnsley also being within the Leeds City Region, reflecting its geographical position midway between Yorkshire's two largest cities.

South Yorkshire County Council was abolished in 1986 and its metropolitan boroughs are now effectively unitary authorities, although the metropolitan county continues to exist in law. As a ceremonial county, South Yorkshire has a Lord Lieutenant and a High Sheriff.

South Yorkshire was created from 32 local government districts of the West Riding of Yorkshire (the administrative county and four independent county boroughs), with small areas from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

In the 2016 referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union, South Yorkshire voted 62% leave and 38% remain, making it one of the most heavily Leave areas in the country.

Strafforth and Tickhill

Strafforth and Tickhill, originally known as Strafforth, was the southernmost wapentake in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England. The west of the district, plus a detached area in the east, constituted the Upper Division, while the central area and a detached part in the extreme east constituted the Lower Division.

Parishes in the Upper Division included Aston, Barnby Dun, Braithwell, Conisbrough, Dinnington, Ecclesfield, Firbeck, Handsworth, Harthill, Hatfield, Hooton Roberts, Laughton-en-le-Morthen, Maltby, Ravenfield, Rawmarsh, Rotherham, Sheffield, South Anston, Sprotborough, Thorpe Salvin, Thrybergh, Todwick, Treeton, Wales, Wath-upon-Dearne, Whiston, Wickersley and parts of Finningley.

The Lower Division included the parishes of Adwick-le-Street, Adwick-upon-Dearne, Arksey, Armthorpe, Bolton-upon-Dearne, Brodsworth, Darfield, Doncaster, Fishlake, High Melton, Hooton Pagnell, Kirk Sandal, Mexborough, Rossington, Thorne, Thurnscoe, Tickhill, Wadworth, Warmsworth, parts of Blyth, Nottinghamshire and the extra-parochial area of Hampole.

The original meeting place of the wapentake is unknown, but may have been the future site of Conisbrough Castle.The Earldom of Strafford takes its name from a variant of this district name, wherein the first incumbent Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford originated.

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