Brad Muster

Bradley William Muster (born April 11, 1965) is a former American football fullback. He played college football at Stanford. He was selected in the 1st round (23rd overall) of the 1988 NFL Draft by the Chicago Bears.

Brad Muster
No. 25, 22
Position:Fullback
Personal information
Born:April 11, 1965 (age 54)
Novato, California
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school:Novato (CA) San Marin
College:Stanford
NFL Draft:1988 / Round: 1 / Pick: 23
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing attempts:520
Rushing yards:2,231
Rushing touchdowns:24
Receptions:202
Receiving yards:1,906
Touchdown catches:7
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

Muster attended San Marin High School in Novato, California, graduating in 1983.[1] He later attended Stanford University. In the 1984 Big Game, Muster ran the ball for 204 yards on 34 carries. He had 78 receptions in the 1985 season, which is tied for third place in the Pacific-10 Conference. Muster graduated from Stanford in 1988 and was drafted by the Chicago Bears in first round of the 1988 NFL Draft.

Professional career

He was used as a fullback, and his goal when he didn't have the ball was to help block for Neal Anderson. After the 1992 season, coach Dave Wannstedt would not let Muster be a featured back, so he signed a free agent contract with the Saints. The man he replaced, Craig Heyward, ended up playing with the Bears. Muster retired after the 1994 season due to nagging injuries.

Personal

Brad Muster lives in Sonoma County with his wife, son, and daughter. He is an assistant coach for the men's golf team at Santa Rosa Junior College in Santa Rosa, California.[2]

References

  1. ^ Marin High School Athletic Hall of Fame Archived 2010-03-28 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Santa Rosa College - Physical Education, Dance & Athletics Archived December 12, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific 10 Conference teams for the 1985 college football season.

1986 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1986 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1986 college football season.

1986 College Football All-America Team

The 1986 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1986. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1986 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1986 Gator Bowl

The 1986 Gator Bowl game was a post-season college football bowl game between the Stanford Cardinal and the Clemson Tigers, played on December 27, 1986, at Gator Bowl Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida. It was the 42nd edition of the bowl game. Through a sponsorship agreement announced in November, the bowl was officially known as the Mazda Gator Bowl.

1987 Stanford Cardinal football team

The 1987 Stanford Cardinal football team represented Stanford University in the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1988 Chicago Bears season

The 1988 Chicago Bears season was their 69th regular season and 19th postseason completed in the National Football League. The Bears looked to improve on an 11–4 finish that won them the NFC Central Division but where they were eliminated for the second consecutive year by the Washington Redskins. The Bears won 12 games and lost 4, tying for the best record in the league with the Buffalo Bills and the AFC Champion Cincinnati Bengals, and earned home field advantage in the NFC. However, the Bears failed to advance to the Super Bowl as one of the top two seeds for a third straight season, falling to the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Championship Game at Soldier Field. This was the second time that the 49ers and Bears had met for a trip to the Super Bowl during the decade, with the 49ers defeating the Bears on their way to Super Bowl XIX.

Coach Mike Ditka suffered a heart attack during the season, but was back on the sidelines 11 days later. Ditka was named coach of the year for the second time in his career. This was Jim McMahon's last season as starter for the Bears as he was traded during the following offseason to the San Diego Chargers.

1989 Chicago Bears season

The 1989 Chicago Bears season was their 70th regular season completed in the National Football League. The Bears were looking to win the NFC Central for a sixth consecutive season, but instead finished with a 6–10 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1983. The Bears’ offseason moves prior to this season had consequences for years afterward as the pieces from Super Bowl XX’s team slowly began to leave or retire.

1990 Chicago Bears season

The 1990 Chicago Bears season was their 71st regular season and 20th postseason completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears were looking to return to the playoffs after missing them in 1989 and did so, winning their sixth NFC Central Division championship in seven seasons. With the change in playoff structuring that began in 1990, the Bears were not guaranteed a bye week for winning the division and had to play on Wild Card weekend. They defeated the New Orleans Saints in the Wild Card round but were defeated by the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants at Giants Stadium in the Divisional Playoffs. This was also the last division title the Bears would win until 2001.

For the only time in Mike Ditka's tenure as the Bears' head coach, the team played a regular season game in the state of Arizona when they visited the Phoenix Cardinals on October 28. Chicago left Tempe victorious; it was the Bears' first matchup against the Cardinals since Chicago visited the Cardinals in St. Louis six years earlier.

Late in the season, tragedy struck when defensive tackle Fred Washington, the Bears' second-round pick in the 1990 NFL Draft, was killed in a car accident on December 21, 1990.

1991 Chicago Bears season

The 1991 Chicago Bears season was their 72nd regular season and 21st postseason completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears returned to the playoffs for a second consecutive season as one of three NFC Wild Cards, finishing with an 11–5 record and in second place in the NFC Central. They were beaten, however, by the Dallas Cowboys in their first playoff game. This was Mike Ditka's last playoff game as a head coach.

1992 Chicago Bears season

The 1992 Chicago Bears season was their 73rd regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears were looking to get back into the playoffs for a third straight year and improve on their 11–5 record, which was good enough for second place in the NFC Central, and to win their eighth division title in ten years. Although the Bears had a 4–3 record through seven games, they lost eight of their remaining nine (including six consecutively) and finished at 5–11. The Bears' poor record resulted in the termination of Mike Ditka as head coach on January 5, 1993 after eleven seasons. Dave Wannstedt, who was serving as the Dallas Cowboys' defensive coordinator, was hired to take his place. Ditka was fired from coaching the Bears with a 106-62 record, playoff appearances in 7 out of 11 seasons since 1982 and a Super Bowl victory in 1985, with the defense considered the best of all time. He would return as a head coach in the NFL with the New Orleans Saints in 1997.

1993 New Orleans Saints season

The 1993 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 27th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to match their previous season's output of 12–4, winning only eight games, despite starting the season 5–0. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time in four years.

Quarterback Bobby Hebert, who was the Saints' starter from late 1985 through 1992, save for a season-long holdout in 1990, signed as a free agent with the division rival Atlanta Falcons. Wade Wilson, who had fallen out of favor with the Minnesota Vikings after the hiring of coach Dennis Green in 1992, was signed as Hebert's replacement.During a loss to the New York Giants on Monday Night Football, fans in the Louisiana Superdome let out a sarcastic cheer when Wilson was injured. The incident enraged coach Jim Mora, who let loose with a tirade during his post-game press conference.

1994 New Orleans Saints season

The 1994 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 28th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to match their previous season's output of 8–8, winning only seven games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the second straight year.

James Rouse (American football)

James David Rouse (born December 18, 1966) is a former American football running back. He played collegiately for the Arkansas Razorbacks, and in the National Football League for the Chicago Bears.

John Washington (American football)

John Earl Washington (born February 20, 1963, in Houston, Texas) is a former American football defensive end in the National Football League between 1986 and 1993 for the New York Giants and the New England Patriots. He played college football at Oklahoma State University and was drafted in the third round of the 1986 NFL Draft.

One of his biggest contributions to the game while playing for the Giants was making a goal line stand in a 1990 divisional playoff game versus the Chicago Bears. On 4th and goal at the Giants' 1 yard line, Washington eluded a blocker and stuffed fullback Brad Muster. His stop prevented the Bears from cutting into the Giants' 10-0 second quarter lead and the Giants cruised the rest of the way to a 31-3 victory en route to their second Super Bowl championship.

List of Stanford Cardinal bowl games

The Stanford Cardinal football team competes as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), representing Stanford University in the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference. Prior to 1930, the team had no official nickname. From 1930 to 1972, the team was known as the Indians; from 1972 to 1981, the team was known as the Cardinals; since 1982, the team has competed as the Cardinal.

Since the establishment of the team in 1892, Stanford has appeared in 30 bowl games. Included in these games are 15 appearances in the Rose Bowl Game and six Bowl Championship Series (BCS)/New Year's Six game appearances with an overall record of 15 wins, 14 losses, and one tie.

San Marin High School

San Marin High School is a high school located in Novato, California, in the United States.

Stanford Cardinal football statistical leaders

The Stanford Cardinal football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Stanford Cardinal football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Cardinal represent Stanford University in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although Stanford began competing in intercollegiate football in 1891, the school's official record book generally does not lists players from before the 1940s, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1940s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. Stanford has played in a bowl game nine times since this decision, allowing players in these years (2009 through 2017) an extra game to accumulate statistics. Similarly, the Cardinal have appeared in the Pac-12 Championship Game four times since it began in 2011.

The top nine seasons in Stanford history in both total offensive yards and points scored have all come since 1999.These lists are updated through Stanford's game against Oregon on September 22, 2018.

Wrestling Observer Newsletter

The Wrestling Observer Newsletter (WON) is a newsletter that covers professional wrestling and mixed martial arts.

Founded in print in 1982 by Dave Meltzer, the Wrestling Observer website merged with Bryan Alvarez's Figure Four Weekly website in 2008. Issues are offered in print and digital. The newsletter is often considered the first "dirt sheet", which is a wrestling publication which covers the art from a real life perspective.

Overall (1975–1982)
Offensive (1983–present)
Defensive (1983–present)
Freshman (1999–2008)
Freshman Offensive (2009–present)
Freshman Defensive (2009–present)
Offense
Defense
Special teams

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