Brad Budde

Brad Edward Budde (born May 9, 1958) is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive guard in the National Football League (NFL) for seven seasons during the 1980s. Budde played college football for the University of Southern California (USC), and was an All-American and the winner of the Lombardi Award. He was a first-round pick in the 1980 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the NFL's Kansas City Chiefs.

Brad Budde
Brad Budde playing for USC
No. 66, 71
Position:Offensive guard
Personal information
Born:May 9, 1958 (age 60)
Detroit, Michigan
Career information
High school:Kansas City (MO) Rockhurst
College:USC
NFL Draft:1980 / Round: 1 / Pick: 11
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:92
Games started:79
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Budde was born in Detroit, Michigan. He attended Rockhurst High School in Kansas City, Missouri.

College career

Budde attended the University of Southern California (USC) and played for the USC Trojans football team from 1976 to 1979. He was the first player since World War II to start as a freshman. Budde is one of USC's most highly decorated offensive lineman. As a senior in 1979, he was a unanimous first-team All-American, runner-up in the Outland Trophy voting, USC Offensive Player of the Year, USC Most Inspirational Player, and an Academic All-American. He was also selected as the first and only Lombardi Award winner in USC's history. In 1980, Budde also earned the NCAA Post Graduate Scholarship. During his career at USC, Budde started in three Rose Bowls, all won by USC. In 1978, led by head coach John Robinson, USC won a share of the national championship.

Budde was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1990, the USC Hall of Fame in 1999, and the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 2010.

Professional career

Budde was the eleventh pick in the first round of the 1980 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. Budde and his father, All-Pro Ed Budde, became the first and only father and son in NFL history to be drafted in the first round to the same team and play the same position. He played for the Chiefs through 1987.

Personal life

Off the field, Budde and his wife, Nicolette, worked with abused and neglected children through Camp Opportunity and Division of Family Services in Kansas City, Missouri.

Following retirement from the NFL in 1988, Budde returned to college and earned his master's degree in physical therapy from Loma Linda University. For the last 17 years, Brad has rehabilitated senior citizens as President of Budde Physical Therapy, Inc. From 1995 to 2005, Brad also worked as the offensive line coach at San Clemente High School and Orange Coast College.

In 2005 Budde founded GameDay Performance Systems, bringing the fundamentals of high performing sports teams into the workplace.

Budde lives with his wife Nicolette in Capistrano Beach, California. They are the parents of two children, Sasha and Beau. Sasha is a high school English teacher in Irvine, California and won the Teacher of Excellence award for the 2011–12 school year; she resides with her husband Sean in San Clemente, California. Beau is a high school social science teacher and is the quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator at University High School in Irvine; he and his wife, Annette, live in Orange, California.

External links

1978 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1978 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1978 College Football All-America Team

The 1978 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1978. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1978 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

1978 USC Trojans football team

The 1978 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season. Following the season, the Trojans were crowned national champions according to the Coaches Poll. While Alabama claimed the AP Poll title because it had defeated top-ranked Penn State on the field, the Trojans pointed out that they had also only lost once and had beaten Alabama in the regular season.

1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1979 College Football All-America Team

The 1979 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1979. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1979 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

1979 USC Trojans football team

The 1979 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled an 11–0–1 record (6–0–1 against conference opponents), won the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 389 to 171. The team was ranked #2 in both the final AP Poll and the final UPI Coaches Poll.

Quarterback Paul McDonald led the team in passing, completing 164 of 264 passes for 2,223 yards with 18 touchdowns and six interceptions. Charles White led the team in rushing with 332 carries for 2,050 yards and 19 touchdowns. Dan Garcia led the team in receiving with 29 catches for 492 yards and three touchdowns.The team was named national champion by the College Football Researchers Association, an NCAA-designated major selector.

1980 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1980 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League and 21st overall. They improved from 1979 from a 7–9 to an 8–8 record, the most wins for the franchise since an 8–6 season in 1972, but with missing the playoffs for the ninth consecutive season.

The Chiefs selected guard Brad Budde, the son of Chiefs Hall of Fame guard Ed Budde, as the team's first-round draft choice, making the Buddes the first father-son combination to become first-round draftees of the same team in NFL history. In a then-controversial move on August 26, the Chiefs released placekicker Jan Stenerud, who at the time was club's all-time leading scorer. He was replaced by journeyman Nick Lowery, who had been cut 11 times by eight different teams himself.After suffering an 0–4 start, the team rebounded to post a four-game winning streak. After Steve Fuller was sidelined with a knee injury late in the season, former Miami 12th-round draft choice Bill Kenney became the team's starting quarterback. He was so anonymous that when he appeared in that contest, the name on the back of his jersey was inadvertently misspelled "Kenny." Kenney went on to lead the club to a 31–14 victory against Denver on December 7 in his initial NFL start. The defense continued to evolve as defensive end Art Still and safety Gary Barbaro became the first Chiefs defensive players to be elected to the Pro Bowl in five seasons.

1983 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1983 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 14th season in the National Football League and the 24th overall. They matched on their 6–10 record and last place finish in the AFC West.

The Chiefs fired head coach Marv Levy on January 4 after compiling a 31–42 record. Dallas Cowboys quarterbacks coach John Mackovic was named the fifth head coach in team history on February 2. The 39-year-old Mackovic became the youngest individual ever to hold that post for the club. The Chiefs held the seventh overall pick in the 1983 NFL Draft and selected quarterback Todd Blackledge. The Chiefs would not draft another quarterback in the first round until the 2017 NFL Draft when they drafted Patrick Mahomes.

Tragedy struck the Chiefs on June 29 when Joe Delaney drowned while attempting to save the lives of three children in Monroe, Louisiana. Delaney was posthumously awarded the Presidential Citizen's Medal by Ronald Reagan on July 13. Linebacker Bobby Bell became the first Chiefs player to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on July 30, providing some solace for the mourning Chiefs fan base following Joe Delaney's death.

With Bill Kenney and Todd Blackledge both on the roster, starting Steve Fuller was traded to the Los Angeles Rams on August 19. Kenney earned a Pro Bowl berth after racking up a franchise-record 4,348 passing yards, while wide receiver Carlos Carson hauled in 80 passes for 1,351 yards. Despite the team's high-flying passing game, head coach John Mackovic had trouble finding a suitable replacement for Joe Delaney and the running back position. The highest scoring contest in franchise history took place as the Chiefs and Seattle Seahawks combined for 99 points in a wild, 51–48 overtime loss at the Kingdome. A meager crowd of 11,377 braved near-zero degree temperatures to attend the club's season-ending 48–17 win against Denver on December 18, the smallest attendance figure ever for a Chiefs game at Arrowhead as the club finished the year at 6–10.

Aaron Taylor (American football, born 1975)

Aaron Taylor (born January 21, 1975) is a former American college football player for the University of Nebraska. Taylor was recognized as an All-American and won the Outland Trophy in 1998.

Budde

Budde is a surname of Scandinavian origin. Notable people with the surname include:

Brad Budde (b. 1958), American professional football player

Christoph Budde (1963–2009), German professional football player

Ed Budde (b. 1940), American professional football player

Gustav Henrik Andreas Budde-Lund (1846–1911), Danish zoologist

Jonas Budde (1644–1710), Danish-Norwegian army officer

Jöns Budde (c. 1435–1495), Finnish Franciscan friar

Kai Budde (b. 1979), German professional Magic: The Gathering player

Karl Budde (1850–1935), German theologian

Mariann Budde (b. 1959), diocesan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, D.C.

Robert Budde (b. 1966), Canadian poet, novelist, and professor

Ryan Budde (b. 1979), American professional baseball player

Theo Budde (1889–1959), Dutch jeweller, preservationist, and poet

Vincens Budde (1660–1729), Norwegian army officer

Dean Steinkuhler

Dean Elmer Steinkuhler (born January 27, 1961) is a former professional American football guard in the National Football League (NFL) for eight seasons in the 1980s and 1990s. Steinkuhler played college football for the University of Nebraska, and was recognized as an All-American. He was selected in the first round of the 1984 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Houston Oilers of the NFL.

Ed Budde

Edward Leon Budde (born November 2, 1940) is a former American football player. He played professionally as an offensive guard for the Kansas City Chiefs in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL).

Kris O'Dowd

Kristofer O'Dowd (born May 14, 1988) is a former American football center. He was signed by the Arizona Cardinals as an undrafted free agent in 2011. He played college football for the University of Southern California.

Lombardi Award

The Lombardi Award is awarded by the Lombardi Foundation annually to the best college football player, regardless of position, based on performance, as well as leadership, character, and resiliency. From 1970 until 2016 the award was presented by Rotary International specifically to a lineman or linebacker. The Lombardi Award program was approved by the Rotary International club in Houston in 1970 shortly after the death of famed National Football League coach Vince Lombardi. The committee outlined the criteria for eligibility for the award, which remained in place until 2016: A player should be a down lineman on either offense or defense or a linebacker who lines up no further than five yards deep from the ball.The voting electorate is made up of the head coaches from all NCAA Division I schools, sports media personnel from across the country, and former winners and finalists of the Lombardi Award. The total number of voters is approximately 500. Ohio State University holds the record for most Lombardi awards with six. Orlando Pace, the only two-time winner (1995 and 1996), is the most recent offensive lineman to be honored.

The main part of the trophy used to be a block of granite, paying homage to Lombardi's college days at Fordham University as an offensive lineman when his offensive line was referred to as the "Seven Blocks of Granite". A new trophy designed by Texas sculptor Edd Hayes replaced the original block of granite.

Lott Trophy

The Lott IMPACT Trophy is presented annually to the college football defensive IMPACT player of the year. IMPACT is an acronym for: Integrity, Maturity, Performance, Academics, Community, and Tenacity. The award purports to equally recognize the personal character of the winning player as well as his athletic excellence. The award selection is voted on by members of the national media, previous finalists, the board of directors of the Pacific Club IMPACT Foundation. The award is named in honor of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame defensive back, Ronnie Lott.

Rockhurst High School

Rockhurst High School is a private, Roman Catholic, Jesuit, all-boys, preparatory school founded in 1910 along with Rockhurst College, in Kansas City, Missouri, United States. It moved away from the College in 1962 to the border between the Kansas City suburbs in Missouri and in Kansas.

Rockhurst is accredited by the North Central Education Association and is a member of the North Central Education Association of Independent College Preparatory Schools, the Jesuit Secondary Education Association, and the National Association for College Admission Counseling (and its regional affiliates).

UPI Lineman of the Year

The United Press International Lineman of the Year award was given annually by United Press International (UPI) to the lineman of the year in college football. With the demise of UPI in 1997, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive linemen were eligible, including offensive ends, with one, Howard Twilley, winning in 1965. Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Ross Browner of Notre Dame was the only two-time winner.

USC Trojans football

The USC Trojans football program represent University of Southern California in the sport of American football. The Trojans compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the South Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12).

Formed in 1888, the program has over 830 wins and claims 11 consensus Division I Football National Championships. USC has had 13 undefeated seasons including 8 perfect seasons, and 39 conference championships. USC has produced 7 Heisman Trophy winners, 81 first-team Consensus All-Americans, including 27 Unanimous selections, and 500 NFL draft picks, most all-time by any university, the Trojans also have had more players drafted in the first round than any other university, with 80 as of the 2017 draft. USC has had 34 members inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, including former players Matt Leinart, O.J. Simpson, and Ronnie Lott and former coaches John McKay and Howard Jones. The Trojans boast 12 inductees in the Pro Football Hall Of Fame, the 2nd-most of any school, including Junior Seau, Bruce Matthews, Marcus Allen, and Ron Yary.

The Trojans have 52 bowl appearances, 39 of which are among the New Year's Six Bowls. With a record of 34–18, USC has the highest all-time post-season winning percentage of schools with 25 or more bowl appearances.

The Trojans play their home games in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, located across the exposition Park Rose Garden from USC's University Park, Los Angeles campus. The stadium is also known as "The Grand Old Lady", having been built almost 100 years ago.

Will Shields

Will Herthie Shields (born September 15, 1971) is a former college and professional American football player who was an offensive guard in the National Football League (NFL) for fourteen seasons. He played college football for the University of Nebraska, earning consensus All-American honors and winning the Outland Trophy. He played his entire professional career for the NFL's Kansas City Chiefs, and never missed a game in fourteen seasons. Shields was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2015.

Offense
Defense
Special teams

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